Undergraduate Course Descriptions | Spring 2020

Courses

* indicates courses that count towards the Pre-1700 requirement for the English major.
** indicates courses that count towards the 1700-1900 requirement for the English major.

Creative Writing

ENCW 2200 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 233)
Jeb Livingood

This class introduces you to the techniques and craft involved in creative nonfiction writing. We’ll explore a number of creative nonfiction forms in short assignments during the first half of the semester, acquainting you with some of the major writing strategies that apply to each one. You will learn to conduct extensive research and incorporate it into a longer revision of one of those assignments. We’ll explore the ethical and professional constraints of using the terms “creative” and “nonfiction” in such rapid succession. When does creativity become fabrication and misrepresentation? And when does creativity help us get closer to the truth? This course also satisfies UVA’s Second Writing Requirement. Accordingly, you will need to generate more than twenty pages (4,000 words) of written material over the course of the semester. Most of you will exceed that page/word minimum significantly. So, expect lots of writing, and lots of revision.

ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing (8 sections)

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements. 

001
MW 200-315 (Bryan 334)

002
MWF 1100-1150 (New Cabell 115)

003
MW 930-1045 (Bryan 233)

004
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 330)

005
MW 600-715 (Bryan 203)

006
MW 600-715 (Bryan 330)

007
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 594)

008
MW 330-445 (Bryan 330)

ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing (6 sections)

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.

003
TR 500-615 (Bryan 235)

004
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 330)

005
TR 500-615 (Bryan 328)

006
MWF 100-150 (Bryan 312)

007
MW 200-315 (Bryan 332)

008
MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan 328)

ENCW 3310-001 - Intermediate Poetry Writing

T 100-330 (Bryan 233)
Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy), to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 3310-002 // Intermediate Poetry Writing // After Confession: Experiments in Self-Representation

R 1000-1230 (Dawson's Row 1)
Brian Teare

Instructor Permission Required.

This is primarily a writing workshop, though it also includes a focused reading and critical thinking component. Our semester together will be roughly divided into quarters: reading followed by workshop followed by reading followed by workshop. Our assigned readings will explore experiments in self-representation, while prompts and assignments derived from our reading will serve as springboards into new writing. Together as colleagues and critics, alone as writers and readers, we’ll be thinking about how poets use both page and process as sites for experiments in self-representation: typography, orthography, and visual images serve as elements of self-invention and self-portraiture on the page for some, whereas somatic rituals, walks, and technology-based constraints serve as interventions into the writing process for others. Though suggested writing assignments will arise out of the readings and our critical discussions, the workshop portion of the class is meant for each of us to present works-in-progress, excerpts from our experiments in self-representation. During the workshop quarters of the semester, we’ll hand in two packets of five-six pages each, thus leaving room for us to workshop both excerpts of longer serial projects and/or sheaves comprised of individual poems. During the workshop’s reading quarters, we’ll move through six very different experiments in self-representation. The first three focus on textual experiments: Jos Charles’s feeld, which intervenes into orthographic conventions as a means to articulate trans identity; Douglas Kearney’s Patter, which uses experiments in typography to dramatize black masculinity and explore fatherhood; Diana Khoi Nguyen employs images, collages, and typographical experiments to visualize the parameters of the grieving self. The second three focus on process-based experiments: the lines of Tommy Pico’s IRL imitate the constraint of composing on a text messaging app, whose formal and metrical limitations shape his long, intimate negotiation of real life as an indigenous poet; Kaia Sand’s remember to wave is a “poetry walk” that spatializes the history of Portland, OR and places her white self in relation to both past and present; and CAConrad’s A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon uses somatic rituals to both connect more deeply to self and to others but also to generate poetic language that can be shaped into radical poems of queer resistance. Though both our critical discussions and workshops will focus primarily on the poetics of autobiographical writing, we’ll discuss the conceptual and political aspirations of each book we read and talk throughout the semester about subjectivity, positionality, representation, and aesthetics.

ENCW 3610-001 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

W 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Christopher Tilghman

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ct2a@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS before classes begin.

ENCW 3610-002 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

T 200-430 (Bryan 334)
Thomas Pierce

Instructor Permission Required.

ENCW 4350 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing: The Truthful Imaginarium

W 1000-1230 (Dawson's Row 1)
Jane Alison

Instructor Permission Required.

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to explore how the personal essay dwells at the rich interface between their own minds and the world: that is, how their personal sensibility or “imaginarium” casts light, darkness, and color upon what they see and write. You’ll cycle through a series of micro-essays in which you’ll write about single subjects—an object, perhaps, or a room, color, plant, moment, person, animal—drawing both on your most inventively associative mind and on researchable or verifiable information. Then, working from these short pieces, you’ll develop a single long personal essay that will be a literary site of imaginative but truthful exploration, inward and out. Most of this writing will be considered and discussed by the group, of course. Along the way you’ll also read many short examples of inventive, revelatory writing by writers such as Eula Biss, Brian Blanchfield, Jenny Boully, Garnette Cadogan, Anne Carson, John D’Agata, Annie Dillard, Maria Gainza, Han Kang, Dinty Moore, Jericho Parms, Lia Purpura, and Richard Selzer. To be considered for this class, be a serious and imaginative writer and send me a short sample of your work (jas2ad@virginia.edu).

ENCW 4550 - Topics in Literary Prose: Theory in Practice

M 2:00-430 (New Cabell 315)
Christopher Tilghman

Instructor Permission Required.

In this course we will investigate how fiction works with a series of creative weekly exercises designed around the insights of structuralist narrative theory.  The course is intended for students who have already written fiction through workshops or their own efforts and now wish to gain a more professional understanding of the mechanics and techniques of literary prose.   Each week we will discuss one topic, such as the five levels of dialogue or the modalitites of narrative distance, and then attempt to put these insights to work in five-page weekly submissions. The focus of the course is on the practice, but by the end of the semester sstudents will have gained a very useful familiarity with a body of theory that can only help them understand the alchemies of the written page.

ENCW 4720 - Area Program in Literary Prose Thesis Course

R 200-430 (Dawson's Row 1)
Micheline Marcom

Instructor Permission Required.

Directed writing project for students in the English Department's Undergraduate Area Program in Literary Prose, leading to completion of an extended piece of creative prose writing.

ENCW 4810 - Advanced Fiction Writing I

W 400-630 (Dawson's Row 1)
Elizabeth Denton

Instructor Permission Required.

ENCW 4820 - Poetry Program Poetics: Animal Print (or, Poems That Bark, Chirp, Buzz & Squeak)

W 100-330 (Dawson's Row 1)
Kiki Petrosinio

In this APPW craft seminar, we’ll read several works of poetry for which the representation of animals (broadly defined to include mammals, birds, insects, mythical creatures, and/or other non-human species) is a key element of the project. In these texts, the presence of such creatures, be they real or imaginary, offers powerful opportunities for innovative language and other experiments in verse. How might developing a system of animal-related imagery—or even writing from the imagined perspective of an animal—allow the poet to ask urgent questions about life, love, grief, or joy? Coursework—two mini essays on relevant craft topics, a small group of original poems, and a final portfolio—will invite students to track, through close reading, animal motifs across different poets’ works. Students also will have the opportunity to develop their own poems featuring real or fantastical creatures. Though this is not a traditional workshop, students should be prepared to offer constructive critiques of their classmates’ works-in-progress. The final grade will be calculated based on the above items, plus attendance and participation. Instructor permission required.

ENCW 4830 - Advanced Poetry Writing I

R 200-430 (Bryan 330)
Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour writing workshop for advanced poetry writers, focused on student poems and assigned reading for craft discussion.  Along with a semester portfolio of poems, students will write short prose pieces on poetry and will offer one in-class presentation. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy), to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 4920 - Poetry Program Capstone

Lisa Spaar

This is the required capstone course designed for fourth-year students in the Department’s Area Program in Poetry Writing. The Capstone project allows advanced poetry writing students to read widely and across disciplines in areas of individual aesthetic interest, to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work. The course involves a combination of student presentations of aesthetic influences, discussions of “constellations” of student work, whole manuscript evaluations, and one-on-one conferring with the instructor. After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading. The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.  This course is open only to students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, and admission is by permission of instructor.  

Enrollment Cap:  10

English Literature

ENGL 2500-001 - Introduction to Literary Studies: Queerpocalypse! Or, the Gay Nineties

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 332)
Sarah Berkowitz

Can queerness cause the apocalypse? If we bring about the end of binary gender, do we bring about the end of the world? Will a new era offer new expressions and configurations of love, or will it be the end of love altogether? When centuries draw to their close, both readers and writers tend to get anxious. That anxiety is often the symptom and the cause of what novelist George Gissing called “sexual anarchy;” the breakdown of traditional gender roles and a certain kind of decadent liberation that some found…intimidating. In this class we will engage with novels, art, music, and films from the end of the twentieth century and the nineteenth century, and consider how monsters in culture reflect monsters of the epoch. By comparing the works from the end of the last two centuries, we will ask how art (broadly defined) reflects our anxieties, and how it helps us transcend them.

ENGL 2500-002 - Introduction to Literary Studies: Queerpocalypse! Or, the Gay Nineties

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 332)
Sarah Berkowitz

Can queerness cause the apocalypse? If we bring about the end of binary gender, do we bring about the end of the world? Will a new era offer new expressions and configurations of love, or will it be the end of love altogether? When centuries draw to their close, both readers and writers tend to get anxious. That anxiety is often the symptom and the cause of what novelist George Gissing called “sexual anarchy;” the breakdown of traditional gender roles and a certain kind of decadent liberation that some found…intimidating. In this class we will engage with novels, art, music, and films from the end of the twentieth century and the nineteenth century, and consider how monsters in culture reflect monsters of the epoch. By comparing the works from the end of the last two centuries, we will ask how art (broadly defined) reflects our anxieties, and how it helps us transcend them.

ENGL 2502 - Masterpieces of English Literature: Literature and the Nonhuman

MW 330-445 (Shannon House 111)
Casey Ireland

This course will examine the ways in which English prose and poetry from the 14th through the 18th centuries respond to nature as both a concept and a physical reality. From the wastelands of Arthurian romance to Jefferson's "Notes on the State of Virginia," we will track the literary function of the "natural" as a constructed category and a place.

ENGL 2504-001 - Major Authors of American Literature: Animals, Monsters, Ghosts

MW 500-615 (New Cabell 309)
Julia Dauer

This class examines the powerful animals, strange monsters, and terrifying ghosts that populate American literature.  We’ll ask: Why are powerful nonhuman beings so common in American literature?  How are animals, monsters, and ghosts related to each other?  How do authors use nonhuman elements to shape their narratives?  How might these representations be significant?  Texts include works by major American authors including Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Carmen Maria Machado, and Tommy Pico.  Coursework includes reading responses, formal essays with required revision, and a final exam.  Attendance and active participation required.

ENGL 2506-001 - Lyric and the Environment

MWF 1100-1150 (Shannon House 108)
Micah Holmes

This course will examine the ways in which poets have described, imagined, and positioned themselves with respect to the world around them in both natural and manmade settings. Beginning with the Romantics in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and ending with our contemporary moment, we will track how changes in the natural world from industrialization to climate change have been reflected in the poetry and poetics of the major (and sometimes 'minor') writers of the last few hundred years.

ENGL 2506-002 - Introduction to Poetry

TR 200-315 (Bryan 330)
Walter Jost

Mindful of your own words? Intrigued by what seems designed to confuse you? Summoned by some spirit? Skeptical about the cash value of reading poetry in a world of internet memes and Breaking News? This introductory course invites you to talk through shared intuitions, hesitations, doubts, and hopes with like-minded others. The semester is centered on close reading and class discussion of selected American poets. One-paragraph responses for class preparation, and three five-page papers. Meets Second Writing Requirement.  

ENGL 2506-003 - Poets' Prose

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 309)
Tom Berenato

This course considers the prose of major British and American poets since the French Revolution. Alongside poets’ novels, memoirs, essays and letters, we will also read their poems. By tracking theories of the distinction, and indistinction, between prose and poetry in practice, we will arrive at a detailed understanding of the changing stance of the poet to his or her reading public over two centuries on two continents.   

ENGL 2506-004 - 19th-Century British Women Poets

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 594)
Sarah Storti

This course considers the poetry of several women writers across the length of the long nineteenth century. Some of these poets are considered “canonical” today, while others remain more obscure. Questions the course will address include: How do women poets embrace, reject, or modify one another’s legacies? What effect does contemporary popularity have on our modern critical assessment of these poets? How did new technological and formal innovations in print media affect what these women wrote, and how they wrote it? What role does illustration play in these poets’ works? And finally, should we be reading *women’s* poetry, as a thing apart, in the first place? We will attempt to answer these questions in part by paying special attention to the magazines, gift books, literary annuals, newspapers, and collected volumes in which these women published.

ENGL 2506-005 - Introduction to Poetry

TR 330-445 (Bryan 330)
Walter Jost

Mindful of your own words? Intrigued by what seems designed to confuse you? Summoned by some spirit? Skeptical about the cash value of reading poetry in a world of internet memes and Breaking News? This introductory course invites you to talk through shared intuitions, hesitations, doubts, and hopes with like-minded others. The semester is centered on close reading and class discussion of selected American poets. One-paragraph responses for class preparation, and three five-page papers. Meets Second Writing Requirement.  

ENGL 2507-001 - Identity, Selfhood, and Otherness in Renaissance Drama

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 334)
Adriana Streifer

How can Hamlet help us understand our current beliefs about identity and individuality? What does Othello tell us about how a culture designates its “insiders” and “outsiders”? In this course, we will study the theater of the English Renaissance in order to help us understand where our own ideas about identity, selfhood, and otherness come from. We live in an era marked by fierce debates about race, religion, nationalism, gender, and sexuality, but these topics were equally pressing (in different ways) to authors such as Shakespeare and Marlowe, and to their audiences. Our goal is to step outside of ourselves and engage in imaginative time travel, so that we may understand how the concept of identity was and is culturally constructed, both in their time, and in our own. As we read, we will ask ourselves: What makes stage characters seem like “real” people to us? Which characters are marginalized as “others,” and why? How do marginalized figures claim voices of their own? Above all, we will consider how early modern dramatic texts articulate many divergent understandings of the contested territory we call the “self.”

This course will include opportunities to watch several plays, both on stage and on screen. You will not be required to attend screenings or performances at particular times, but you should consider your ability to make time in your schedule to watch several (long-ish) productions before enrolling in the course.

ENGL 2507-002 - Theaters without Borders

TR 330-445 (Maury 110)
Rebecca Kastleman

A theater is defined by the border that separates it from the outside world. Whether that border is a physical barrier or an imagined boundary, it marks out a site in which the rules of ordinary life are suspended: actors can become other persons, time can be accelerated, and everyday objects can transform into extraordinary things. At the same time that works of theater are bound to a particular place, however, they also migrate across geographical and cultural contexts to appear before new audiences. How does theater establish borders, and how does it find ways to slip across them? What is the relationship between performance, location, and migration? This course engages with these questions across an array of contemporary global Anglophone dramas, investigating borders as both a thematic and structural concern of the contemporary stage.

This course takes a broad view of contemporary dramas of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas as well as diverse diaspora cultures. Reading internationally renowned playwrights such as Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka, Caryl Churchill, and Cherríe Moraga as well as emerging dramatists, we explore how these playwrights have engaged with problems of inequality, injustice, and imperial violence by restaging these struggles on the stage. In the process, we discover how performance invents new vocabularies for describing diaspora, migration, and transcultural exchange. Throughout the course, we examine the fundamental workings of dramatic form and track how theater artists have responded to their social, political, and material conditions. Harnessing approaches from the study of theater and performance as well as global Anglophone literature, we ask how theatrical representation shifts in response to artists’ embodied and imaginative migrations.

ENGL 2508-001 - Novels to Live By

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 334)
Karen Chase

The premise of this course is that part of the pleasure we look for when reading lies in thinking about some of the more profound questions about life: where do I find purpose; what are worthy ambitions; how does one find or follow a vocation; what is the relation between truth and belief; what is a meaningful life; what is an ethical life? We will read three great (and lengthy) novels, each of which poses and struggles with these (and similar) questions. There is no didactic intent here: the spirit is philosophical investigation and the method is literary analysis. The novels are:  Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Eliot’s Middlemarch.

You will write weekly responses in addition to one short and one long essay. There will also be  weekly reading quizzes and a final exam.

ENGL 2508-002 - Studies in Fiction: Introduction to Feminist Narratologies

MWF 1200-1250 (Shannon House 108)
Natalie Thompson

A beginner’s guide to interpreting literary texts with the help of narrative theory. 

Narratology is an incredibly versatile way to read the world around you—from Twitter to action movies to academic articles, humans tend to communicate through storytelling. We’ll build on the basic definition of narrative (James Phelan and Peter J. Rabinowitz define narrative as “somebody telling somebody else, on some occasion, and for some purposes, that something happened to someone or something”) and explore how to use narrative theory to effectively analyze texts of all kinds. 

Taking our cue from critics like Susan Lanser and Robyn Warhol, we will build on the formalist (often masculinist) tendencies of classical narratology and embrace a theory of intersectional feminist narratologies, attending, as feminists do, to the material and historical contexts that influence the production and reception of the texts we read. We’ll use the tools of narratology (examining authors, narrators, and narration; plot, time, and progression; space, setting, and perspective; character; and reception and readership) to discuss and write about a sampling of texts from the eighteenth through the twentieth century. 

This course fulfills the second writing requirement, and will offer many opportunities for writing and revision. In addition to three major writing projects, students will complete many shorter writing assignments. Our texts will range from eighteenth-century “it” narratives (tales narrated by, for example, a coin, a pair of ladies’ slippers, or a lap-dog) to nineteenth-century murder mysteries to twentieth- and twenty-first-century experiments with narrative form in fiction and film.

ENGL 2508-003 - Crime and Punishment in Victorian Fiction

MW 200-315 (Bryan 203)
Grace Vasington

Our ongoing moment of obsession with true crime, murder mysteries, thrillers, and serial killers has deep roots in Victorian Britain. Popular newspapers fostered a fascination with gruesome crimes and courtroom drama. Newgate literature presented working-class London as a hotbed of criminality, while sensation fiction grappled with problems of guilt, immorality, and madness in middle-class settings. Characters like Sherlock Holmes popularized the detective as an investigator of contemporary urban life.

Over the course of this class we will confront two, related questions: why did the topic of criminality become such a feature of popular entertainment, and what deeper systems of inequity are reflected in attitudes toward crime and in the criminal justice system itself? Navigating between Victorian fiction and contemporary film and television, we will consider the issue of criminality alongside questions of class, gender, and race. Authors may include Braddon, Doyle,  Stevenson, and Collins, along with selections from the work of David Simon and Paul Feig.

ENGL 2527-001 - Introduction to Shakespeare

TR 930-1045 (Shannon House 109)
Matthew Davis

This course will provide an introduction to Shakespeare’s plays for students with little or no previous exposure to Shakespeare. It is intended especially for students who suffer from that debilitating disease, Shakes-fear.  We will begin by reading Gary Blackwood’s Shakespeare Stealer, a short work (210 pp.) of historical fiction, written for young readers, which provides a very accessible and surprisingly accurate introduction to Elizabethan London and the world of Shakespeare’s acting company. After this introduction, we will read six Shakespeare plays – probably Henry IV, Part One; Hamlet; Macbeth; King Lear; Coriolanus; and The Tempest. For each play, we will examine one of the sources Shakespeare used in writing the play. In a few cases we may also look at a brief, accessible piece of criticism. During the semester, we will go to see at least one play -- probably Henry IV, Part One -- performed by the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton, Virginia. I will seek financial support to offset the cost of this, but there is no guarantee that I will secure any. This means that, in addition to (moderate) textbook expenses, students should be prepared pay for theater tickets and (if necessary) chartered bus transportation to and from Staunton. Additional costs for the trip to Staunton could range from $40 to $200 per student.

ENGL 2527-002 - Text and Performance

MW 200-315 (Bryan 235)
Katharine Maus

In this course we will read three Shakespeare plays and then see two or three film or live-theater versions of each one, considering various ways the directors and actors interpret the plays for a modern audience. Writing assignments are designed to help seminar participants consolidate the analytical and writing skills they need to succeed in college-level classes in English or other humanities fields. In addition to many short, informal writing assignments there will be two formal papers—one short, one longer.

ENGL 2560-001 - Contemporary Literature

TR 500-615 (Wilson 244)
Grace Alvino

ENGL 2570 - American Places

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 389)
Sophie Abramowitz

Who decides how to represent a community, and who are these representations for? How do community members negotiate their places within and against the dominant nationalist mythologies of America?

Using texts, film, maps, and music, this course will explore the ways that American identities are imagined, produced, and contested through a diverse array of American landscapes. Moving through Harlem, Native North America, the “borderlands,” the American South, and even into the sea, the course looks to space, place, and landscape to understand intersecting representations of race, gender, class, citizenship, “civilization,” industry, and nationhood.

In this course you will develop the skills of close literary, visual, and sonic analyses; build convincing critical arguments in your writing and in class discussion; and interpret landscapes across media using the critical methods that you’ve developed over the course of the semester.

ENGL 2572 - Readings in African American Literature: Black Queer Studies

MW 500-615 (New Cabell 395)
Dionte Harris

This course is an introductory theory seminar dedicated specifically to African American and queer literary and cultural theories. In this discussion-based course, we will focus in on emergent debates in both black studies and women, gender, and sexuality studies, outlining and probing the most generative currents of these schools of thought bearing on literature, culture, and performance. Focusing on 20th and 21st African American artistic expression—literature, film, music, visual art—we will consider the complex ways race, gender and sexuality operate in the constitution of “the category of Man, while also providing the conditions of possibility for alternate ways of being in the world.”

ENGL 2592 - Contemporary Women's Texts

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 068)
Susan Fraiman

An introduction to close reading and critical writing focused on recent works by women in a variety of genres and from a range of national contexts. Possible works (final list still to be determined) include stories by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative of growing up by U.S. cartoonist Lynda Barry; a film directed by Lebanese-American Rola Nashef; images by queer, South African photographer Zanele Muholi; a poetic work combining autobiography and anti-racist critique by Claudia Rankine. Our discussion of these texts will address basic formal issues: modes of narration; the difference between “story” and “plot”; the use of framing and other structural devices; the constraints of genre; the handling of images, tone, and diction. Likely thematic concerns include the effects of colonialism and migration on women; explorations by women of growing up, growing old, marriage, maternity, queer sexuality, work, and creativity; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, race, and class; the divergent meanings of feminism for women around the world.  We will work not only on becoming attentive readers but also on learning to conceive and organize effective critical essays. This writing intensive course (three papers totaling 20 pages) satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement. This course is restricted to 1st- and 2nd-year students. 3rd- and 4th-years who have never taken a college-level literature course may contact the instructor to seek special permission.

ENGL 2599-001 - The World Wars in European Literature

MW 330-445 (Monroe Hall 114)
Sarah Cole

The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a film, poem, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, an in-class presentation, and weekly discussion questions. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, Heinrich Böll, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.

ENGL 2599-002 - The Decline of Western Civilization: Punk (sub)Culture and Identity Formation 

MW 500-615 (Bryan 334)
Kathryn Webb-Destefano

This class takes as its central focus the ways in which American punk rock music and punk culture navigate social issues such as class, race, and sexuality. 

Drawing largely on the work of filmmaker Penelope Spheeris, and using the music of Black Flag, Minor Threat, Bad Brains, Bikini Kill and more, this class will examine how punk subculture simultaneously protected and marginalized its members, how subculture undermines pop culture (and pop culture comments on subculture) and how music shapes identity and forges social bonds.

ENGL 2599-003 - Literature and Medicine

MW 200-315 (Shannon House 109)
Lara Musser

This course interrogates how literature helps us inhabit the sociological and psychological experience of illness. We question assumptions about sickness, wellness, healing and harm in literature from the 19th century to now, and how medicine intersects with power, class, and gender. By way of novels, drama, biography, and the past of the UVA Hospital, we ask how illness shapes our relationships, our society, and our experience of the world.

ENGL 2599-004 - Special Topics

TR 200-315 (Shannon House 111)
Lindgren Johnson

ENGL 2599-005 - Nature and Romanticism

MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 310)
Jon D'Errico

In our reading, discussions, and writing this semester, we will explore the development of a modern view of "nature" and "natural" in the transatlantic English-language tradition, especially as connected to how these artists think of human nature. Our readings will include some of the expected ports-of-call for this sort of excursion (Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Emerson, Thoreau, and their cultural heirs), but the texts will range widely, including not only short fiction, poetry, novels, essays, and drama, but also some song lyrics, diary entries, film excerpts, and side trips into the visual arts.

The class satisfies the second writing requirement, and it is appropriate for students considering declaring a major (or minor) in English, as well as for smart and motivated non-majors looking to sharpen already solid writing skills.

ENGL 2599-006 - Painting and Prose

MW 200-315 (Bryan 328)
Cynthia Wall

Somebody once said, “Ut pictura poesis,” or, “Poetry is a speaking picture, painting a silent poetry.” But what does that mean, exactly, and how does it work? Humans have told stories about famous paintings, and painted famous stories, all in attempt to figure out ourselves and our world. This course explores the many ways that art has imagined literature, and literature art, from Ovid and the Bible, through Shakespeare and Milton, Pope and Blake, Rossetti and Tennyson, the Arts and Crafts movement and the Bloomsbury Group. Requirements: active participation, weekly short commentaries, writing workshops, three short papers (5-7pp), and a final exercise

ENGL 3002 - History of Literatures in English II

MW 1100-1150 (Maury 209)
John O'Brien and Victoria Olwell

William Wordsworth, Toni Morrison, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, Emily Dickinson, James Joyce, Zora Neale Hurston, T. S. Eliot: these are some—but not all— of the authors we will be reading and studying together. This class will survey literature in English from around 1800 to the present moment. We will start with the emergence of Romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century and trace the emergence of English as a global language and literature in our post-colonial world. Our itinerary will include stops in Britain, the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, and India. This course is part of the two-semester sequence of the history of literature in English (along with ENGL 3001) that is required of English majors, but is open to anyone interested in exploring some of the most significant works of literature of the last two-plus centuries. You do not need to have taken ENGL 3001 first; the courses can be completed in any order that works best for you.

Discussion Sections:

101
R 830-945 (Dawson's Row 1)

102
R 330-445 (Bryan 235)

103
F 1000-1115 (Dawson's Row 1)

104
F 1130-1245 (Dawson's Row 1)

105
R 1230-145 (Dawson's Row 1)

106
W 500-615 (Bryan 233)

107
R 1100-1215 (Brooks Hall 103)

108
R 200-315 (Dell 2 102)

109
W 330-445 (New Cabell 032)

110
R 500-615 (Bryan 233)

111
R 1230-145 (Bryan 233)

112
R 500-615 (New Cabell 038)

113
W 630-745 (New Cabell 064)

114
R 500-615 (New Cabell 042)

115
W 500-615 (Bryan 312)

116
W 630-745 (New Cabell 066)

ENGL 3025 - African American English

TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 485)
Connie Chic Smith

Black English, Negro dialect, Ebonics, Black slang, and African American English Vernacular (AAEV) are just a few of the names that have been used historically to describe the form of communication that occurs among and between many African Americans.  Rickford & Rickford (2000) define AAEV as the informal speech of many African Americans.

Yet, for as long as there have been Africans in America, this form of communication has been assigned the same designation given to individuals who create and have spoken it for generations; inferior and inappropriate.  The belief that AAEV is a derogatory or demeaning manner in which to speak has been ingrained in the psyche of America and Americans.  This ideology has remained intact until recently.

This course examines the communicative practices of AAEV to explore how a marginalized language dynamic has made major transitions into American mainstream discourse.  AAEV is no longer solely the informal speech of many African Americans; it is the way Americans speak.

*ENGL 3100 - Old Icelandic Literature in Translation

TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 328)
John Casteen

*ENGL 3161 - Chaucer I: Chaucer and His Fellows

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 328)
Gretchen York

*ENGL 3260 - Milton

TR 200-315 (Maury 113)
Clare Kinney

A large part of this course will be dedicated to a careful exploration of John Milton’s enormous and embattled epic of origins, Paradise Lost, but we’ll also be examining several of his earlier poetic experiments and glancing at his political writings on censorship and divorce. Among the issues the course will address: Milton the revolutionary (the politics and poetics of rebellion); Milton the rewriter of Scripture (inspired re-creation or Satanic supplementation?); Milton and gender (is Edenic bliss really conditional upon female secondariness?); Milton and literary history (how can we digest the poetry that tries to swallow all its predecessors?).

Requirements: enthusiasm, stamina, regular attendance and lively participation in class discussions; a short paper on the earlier poetry; midterm examination; series of e-mail response postings on Paradise Lost; either (each student may choose) a  longer paper on Paradise Lost or a very comprehensive final examination on Paradise Lost.

*ENGL 3273 - Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances

MW 1200-1250 (Gilmer 190)
Katharine Maus

This course deals with the second half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, in which he was mainly writing tragedies and romances.  ENRN 3210, the fall semester course, deals with the first half of Shakespeare's career, in which he was mainly writing histories and comedies.  You may take either or both courses; neither is a prerequisite for the other.
2 50-minute lectures and 1 50-minute discussion section per week.

Requirements: 3 five-page papers, a final exam emphasizing material covered in lectures and section meetings, and regular short assignments made by section leaders.

This course does not automatically fulfill the Second Writing Requirement, but it may be tweaked to do so.  See me in the first few weeks of the semester if you are interested in this option.

Discussion Sections:

101
W 100-150 (Bryan 334)

102
F 1200-1250 (New Cabell 042)

103
W 500-550 (Bryan 203)

104
R 330-420 (New Cabell 287)

105
R 430-520 (New Cabell 207)

106
F 1100-1150 (Bryan 312)

**ENGL 3310 - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

TR 1100-1215 (Wilson 214)
Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed.  The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time.  Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print.  This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre during the eighteenth century. Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – letters, drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways. Our authors will include, but not be limited to: Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Class requirements will include weekly reading-response papers, frequent reading quizzes, two essays, and a final exam.  Our class meetings will be discussion based.

**ENGL 3380 - The English Novel I: Run Runaway

MW 330-445 (Bryan 328)
Cynthia Wall

In 1775, the German physicist and satirist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg declared that England had the best novels because England had the best roads. Daughters could escape from their fathers; sons could strike out on adventures; young ladies could make Entrances into the World; criminals could flee their crimes; highwaymen could make their fortunes. This course will explore the ways that eighteenth-century British novels themselves explored time and space, country and city, roads and inns, carriages and ships, in the fiction of John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Tobias Smollett, Jane Austen, and Anonymous. Requirements: Attendance, participation, weekly analytical commentaries, one short (5-7pp.) paper, a midterm, a small group project, and a final exam.

**ENGL 3430 - American Literature to 1865: Literatures of Slavery and Freedom

MW 200-315 (Wilson 238)
Julia Dauer

This survey course examines major works of American literature to 1865, including texts by Mary Rowlandson, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and others.  We’ll focus especially on the ways this literature negotiates the parameters of slavery and freedom in the early U.S.  Class will include an introduction to major movements and authors in the early national and antebellum periods, as well as key thematic threads that structure the emerging (and always contested) American tradition.  Class work includes active class participation, reading response writing, a short paper, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final exam.

**ENGL 3482 - The Fiction of Empire

MW 330-445 (Wilson 238)
Paul Cantor

This course deals with the interplay between literature and British imperialism in the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include orientalism and the representation of the foreign, the ideology of imperialism, literary critiques of imperialism, the impact of imperialism on domestic life in Britain, the problem of heroism on the imperial frontier, the intersection between fiction of empire and other genres (such as science fiction, horror stories, and detective fiction), as well as the relationship between late Victorian popular culture and serious fiction, especially the emergence of literary modernism out of fiction of empire. Authors studied include Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Jules Verne, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, H. G. Wells, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Joseph Conrad. Course requirements include one paper, a midterm, and a final examination

ENGL 3500 - Hacking for Humanists

TR 200-315 (Bryan 328)
Brad Pasanek

This is a course for English majors (and other students) that introduces the basics of computer programming, text analysis, text encoding, and statistics as experimental methodologies that promote new kinds of reading and interpretation. The aim is to move from "computation into criticism." We’ll work, primarily, with a Shakespeare play, poetry by William Blake, and a Jane Austen novel. Students will find these works at the bookstore alongside manuals on Learning Unix and Text Analysis with R. No prior familiarity with coding or the language R required: we’ll be moving slowly, covering the basics. Advanced Computer Science majors will not be turned away, but they will be required to recite poetry aloud in front of their peers and show an interest in Emma Woodhouse’s misprisions.

**ENGL 3540 - Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature: Dangerous Women

TR 1230-145 (Dell 2 100)
Cristina Griffin

When the phrase “nasty woman” rose to the forefront of our cultural discourse, the label rested on a long-standing conception that women can be dangerous just by being women. In this class, we will look at the particular formations of dangerous women that materialized in the nineteenth century, an era in which women simultaneously remained held down by the law and yet unbound by newly possible social roles. Across texts by Jane Austen, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, George Eliot, George Bernard Shaw, and Thomas Hardy, among others, we will consider what precisely made women dangerous as well as the other side of the coin: what put women in danger? What forms of female agency, sexuality, or sociability generate power and which engender fear? And what do we make of men’s roles: what does it look like to be a dangerous man or a man in danger? How do nineteenth-century notions of danger reify a gender binary and what are the ways in which this binary breaks down or becomes fluid? By reading texts across genres—some novels, short stories, poems, essays, and a play—we will immerse ourselves in the particular history of gender, fear, and power articulated by nineteenth-century writers while also avidly seeking out points of connection between these Victorian conceptions of dangerous women and those of our own twenty-first century. Students in this course are forewarned that they will be in danger of reading dangerously fascinating texts, and will be expected to generate dangerously fascinating ideas in response.

ENGL 3559-001 - Memory Speaks

TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 395)
Lorna Martens

Memory is a crucial human faculty.  Our ability to remember our own past is one of the things that make us human.  Memory has long been thought to ground identity: without memory, one has no sense of self.  Memory has been seen as fundamental to psychic health, and even as a remedy in times of trouble, as well as essential to our ability to imagine the future.  Remembering has its delights.  Certainly the idea of losing one’s memory, through shock or illness for example, is terrifying to contemplate.  Yet having too many memories of the wrong kind is believed to endanger our equilibrium.   Maddeningly, given its power to make us healthy or sick, memory often lies beyond our conscious control.  It operates according to its own laws, giving us what we want only sometimes.  Undeniably useful, it has also been seen as deceptive.  It is demonstrably suggestible.  It is not surprising, therefore, that memory is a subject of vital importance in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences alike.

This course will focus on individual memory and in particular on autobiographical memory (our memories of our own lives).  We will read autobiographies and works of fiction, written from the early twentieth century to the present, by Patrick Modiano, Marcel Proust, Rainer Maria Rilke, Mary McCarthy, Vladimir Nabokov, and Marguerite Duras.  Concurrently, we will read psychological, psychoanalytic, and neuroscientific work on memory.   Some attention will be paid to the issues of false memory, external memory, and mediated memory, as well.

ENGL 3559-002 - Women, Childhood, Autobiography

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 209)
Lorna Martens

Women everywhere have been raised differently from men.  They have had different childhoods, their lives have fallen into different patterns, and from the perspective of their lives they have looked back on their childhoods differently.  This course aims to introduce students to what women have written about their childhoods cross-culturally.  The purpose is to acquaint them with the variety of women's childhood experience and also with the different ways in which women have looked back on their experience as adults. This is a literature course.  It will not focus on contrasting the upbringing of women in different societies (that would be the task of anthropology or sociology), but, rather, will consider how adult women reflect back on their childhood experience and write about it.  In every instance we are given not a childhood but a reading of a childhood:  an analysis, or the story of a childhood, a childhood that has been transformed into a story.  Especially the professional writers among the authors present their stories not in a straightforward, chronological manner, but go out of their way to choose an artistic form of presentation (including fictionalization) that adds to what they say about their childhood in so many words.  Thus we will not just read "for the plot," but employ skills in literary analysis in order to discern the "how" as well as the "what" of the narratives.  We will read works by Doris Lessing, Lucy Larcom, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Marie Audoux, Christa Wolf, Nathalie Sarraute, Maxine Hong Kingston, Arundhati Roy, Jamaica Kincaid, and Fatima Mernissi.  Students should be actively interested in the subjects of women's childhood experience and autobiographical writing and be willing to contribute to discussion.  They should expect to do a lot of reading - a book a week.

ENGL 3560 - Being Human: Race, Technology, and the Arts

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 338)
Njelle Hamilton

What makes us human? How did science and technology play a part in racism and the dehumanization of blackness? And how have artists of color re-appropriated science, technology, and science fiction to subvert and resist dehumanization? This course is an introduction to Afrofuturism, exploring the intersections of race and alienness, race and technology, and race and modernity through global futuristic representations of blackness in TV (Extant, Luke Cage), film (Star Trek, Hidden Figures), music (Scratch Perry, Janelle Monaé), art (Wangechi Mutu), and literature (Octavia Butler, Nnedi Okorafor). In this discussion-based seminar, we will trace “like race” tropes in sci-fi, including aliens, monsters, enslavement, and invisibility. We will think about the various ways that black artists/writers/creators displace or “dimension-shift” the African Diaspora experience to grapple with contemporary and historical issues, and employ science/technology/sci-fi to invent places and conditions where blackness can thrive. Assignments will include literary essays and creative work (short films, artwork, mashups, web-content etc) that reimagine and interrogate representations of race and science/technology in contemporary media. (No artistic talent of experience required)

ENGL 3570 - Walt Whitman

TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 485)
Mark Edmundson

Intensive study of Walt Whitman's poetry and life, with focus on the first edition of "Leaves of Grass," and on his work in the hospitals during the Civil War.

ENGL 3610 - Global Cultural Studies

MW 100-150 (Nau 101)
Michael Levenson

Cross-listed with GSGS 3030.

Global Cultural Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to world cultures during the decades just before and after this new millennium.  Engaging with a wide variety of media (including film, popular song, avant-garde art, memoir, political philosophy), the course emphasizes the recent conditions of North and South Africa, China, South Asia, and the Middle East.  Important events – such as the place of Gandhi in present-day Indian politics, the Chinese treatment of the artist Ai Wei Wei, the use of documentary film in the Arab spring, the plight of refugees – will be major focal points.  At every stage, we consider the making of our present-day world and the urgent issues that inform it: the campaign for international human rights, the independence movements in Africa and Asia, the resurgence of religious faith around the world, the crisis of the environment, the rise of nationalism.

Discussion Sections:

101
W 400-450 (New Cabell 056)

102
W 500-550 (Nau 241)

103
W 600-650 (New Cabell 415)

104
W 500-550 (Bryan 330)

105
R 500-550 (New Cabell 111)

106
R 600-650 (New Cabell 066)

107
W 400-450 (New Cabell 283)
Michael Levenson

108
W 600-650 (New Cabell 068)

109
W 500-550 (Nau 142)

110
R 300-350 (New Cabell 056)

111
R 500-550 (New Cabell 332)

ENGL 3740 - Introduction to Asian American Studies

MW 1000-1050 (Maury 104)
Sylvia Chong

Discussion Sections:

101
W 100-150 (Shannon House 108)

102
W 200-250 (Shannon House 108)

103
F 100-150 (Bryan 334)

104
F 200-250 (Bryan 310)

ENGL 3940 - Tutoring Peer Writers

TR 1230-145 (Mechanical Engineering 305)
Marcus Meade

ENGL 3960 - The Lyric

MW 200-315 (Dell 2 100)
John Parker

Working more or less chronologically we'll cover some of the major lyric poems in English from the sixteenth to the twentieth century.  Our central goals: to learn to read poetry as carefully as possible; to gain a sense of "period" or "movement" where something of that sort may be discerned; to develop an analytic prose style adequate to the challenges of complicated literature.

ENGL 3972 - History of Drama II: Neo-Classicism to Now

TR 1230-145 (Bryan Hall 328)
Rebecca Kastleman

This course explores the history of drama, theater, and performance from the 18th century to the present, with a particular emphasis on the electrifying transformations that have rocked European and American stages over the past 100 years. With the birth of what we call “modern” drama in the late nineteenth century, playwrights took up urgent questions about the practice and purpose of writing for the stage. What is drama good for? What kinds of politics emerge in the theater? What aesthetic and sensory possibilities are activated through dramatic form? What is the relationship between actors and their audience? How does performance grapple with questions of identity, representation, and belonging? Such questions continue to animate the work appearing on theater stages today.

We approach these topics by examining a wide range of innovative and influential dramatic works. While our focus is on British and American writers, we adopt a global view of the English-speaking theater, encountering dramas by Norwegian, German, Nigerian, and South African playwrights. We consider major modern writers such as Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett, and James Baldwin alongside contemporary playwrights such as Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Young Jean Lee. Our conversations will continually attend to aspects of live performance, including dramaturgy, design, embodiment, movement, and direction, and students will be asked to view at least one live theater event over the course of the semester. Throughout the course, students will hone their ability to analyze dramatic form and to evaluate the cultural, historical, and political contexts of performance.

*ENGL 4270 - Shakespeare Seminar

MW 1230-145 (Bryan 233)
John Parker

A broad survey of Shakespeare's greatest plays, likely to include The Comedy of Errors, The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard II, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale and The Tempest.

*ENGL 4520 - John Donne and Edmund Spenser

TR 1230-145 (Bryan 330)
Rebecca Rush

In this seminar, you will have the opportunity to dig into the works of two poets you have likely met in other courses. If you have met these two poetic characters, you are likely more struck by their differences than their similarities. Spenser’s intricately fashioned tales of love-lorn shepherds, wandering knights, and subtle sorcerers seem far removed from Donne’s love lyrics with their witty rants and far-flung conceits. It is undeniable that these two poets had different visions of human and divine love and of the best way to body them forth in poetic language. But, in our close study of well-known and less-known works, we will consider the correspondences as well as the incongruities between these two poets. We will read selections from Spenser’s Shepheardes Calender, Faerie Queene, Four Hymns, Mother Hubbard’s Tale, and Amoretti and Epithalamion alongside selections from Donne’s Songs and Sonnets, satires, elegies, holy sonnets, sermons, and devotions. No prior knowledge of Donne or Spenser is required or expected, but a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary—is.

**ENGL 4530 - Fictions and Figures of Empire

TR 1230-145 (Cocke Hall 101)
Kelly Fleming

Before poets claimed that the sun would never set on the British empire, they described British rivers and seas flowing outward from the small island and tides returning with the prizes of the new world and old: commodities (including human beings) and colonies. This course situates eighteenth-century British literature in the context of its global political and economic networks. Beginning with three texts that encapsulate the British imperial dream and include these water metaphors—The Spectator No. 69 by Joseph Addison, “Windsor Forest” by Alexander Pope,  and “Rule Britannia” by James Thomson—we will explore how British literature defined Britishness (an idea that only came into being in 1707 when England annexed Scotland) by representing British culture in opposition to other cultures they encountered across the River Tweed, the Irish Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

We will consider how fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry in this period constructed narratives about the weakness and effeminacy of foreigners and the superiority of the British—narratives that resulted first in commercial interventions but swelled into the large-scale colonization of the nineteenth century. What are the tropes and characters of these narratives? How do these narratives enforce or break down boundaries? Alternatively, how do they forge connections? We will consider how these narratives have real political consequences such as slavery in the Caribbean, the penal laws in Ireland, and the colonization of India. We will also read texts that contradict and counteract this narrative of British moral and political superiority—texts that, occasionally, produced real political change. The course will address these shifting representations of race, class, religion, and gender in an effort to understand how literature played a role in building and sustaining the British empire. 

**ENGL 4540-001 - Literature and Science

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 209)
Paul Cantor

This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.

**ENGL 4540-002 - Nineteenth-Century Social Reform and the Modern Conscience 

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 594)
Indu Ohri

Have you ever wished that you could make a difference in the world? How would you even know where to begin looking? In this course, you will explore the answers to these questions in a profound and surprisingly local way by exploring works of nineteenth-century British literature and the Charlottesville community. These works are the perfect place to go searching for answers because British writers personally knew about injustice, oppression, and poverty. They wrote to jolt their readers into improving the conditions surrounding women’s rights, child labor, urban squalor, and the slave trade. You will be inspired by their passion for social change and learn how to apply past reformers’ values to a range of social concerns today. You will also think about how their reform movements can influence our modern practices of community engagement, local activism, and volunteer work. In the process, you will become a social activist in the Charlottesville community and learn about privilege, inclusivity, and diversity.

How will you achieve all of this? In this class, you will consider how Regency and Victorian writers addressed a range of social problems in various literary forms. You will discuss how the intersection between literature and social reform can limit, advance, or shape activism. You may also be asked to perform volunteer work in the Charlottesville community and tie your experiences to our readings through reflective practices. Finally, you will look at writers seen as turning away from social reform to focus on high society (Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, and Henry James) and ponder whether they are really anti-reform. At a time when you may feel helpless about making a difference in the world, you can make an impact on one small part at a time. You will test George Eliot’s remark about local activism that “the effect of [Dorothea’s] being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts.” Tentative authors include Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Henry Mayhew, John Stuart Mill, and Oscar Wilde. 

ENGL 4559 - Sally Hemings's University

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 312)
Lisa Woolfork

In August 2018, Dean of the University of Virginia’s College of Arts and Sciences Ian Baucom welcomed new and returning faculty advisors with remarks about the state of the college. He emphasized the need for the college to persist in its pursuit of inclusion and diversity by saying, “this is as much Sally Hemings’s university as it is Thomas Jefferson’s.” This course “Sally Hemings’s University.” My objective is to prepare students to reconfigure the status quo which is currently shaped by the normalization of extremism, to help students appreciate the shift from euphemisms (“racially-charged” or “racially-tinged”) to vocabularies of consequence (“racist” or “white supremacist”), to foster a facility for talking capably and comfortably about uncomfortable topics such as systems of domination and their influence upon university and daily life. “Sally Hemings’s University” is a site where the adverse effects of overt and subtle forms of white supremacy, patriarchy, capitalism and other systems of dominance are scrutinized at a location closely aligned with the founding of this nation. As a course, “Sally Hemings’s University” will explore questions generated by re-framing “Mr. Jefferson’s University” as a site that destabilizes the dominant narrative of the university as Jefferson’s primary property and by extension that of similarly entitled white men.

The course will engage creative pedagogies to explore the curricular and cultural consequences of imagining the University of Virginia through the lens of a marginalized enslaved black woman.  Building upon the two Engagement courses I recently developed, my scholarly research in African American literary and cultural production, and in collaboration with a variety of resources on grounds and in the city, the course will take students though a robust series of academic readings, tours, vernacular intellectual formations such as podcasts and blogs to better understand white supremacy and consider what it means to dismantle it. White supremacy, as I remind my students, is not only neo-Nazis and confederate sympathizers marching and physically assaulting students on campus. This system of domination is also subtly routinized in a number of ways including the continual decline of black student enrollment even as the university declares each incoming class more “diverse” than the last, the overrepresentation of black people in university service roles seeming to correspond with their underrepresentation among the faculty, “The Black Tax” (a colloquialism to describe the invisible yet emotionally weighty burden shouldered by black folks at predominantly white institutions), or even hearing from white peers “you’re pretty for a black girl.”  The course will consider the influence of systems of white supremacist and other forms of domination in relation to power and privilege in the context of UVA, Charlottesville, and the nation.

ENGL 4560-002 - Contemporary Women's Texts

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 330)
Susan Fraiman

This course takes up recent Anglophone works by women across multiple genres and referencing a range of national contexts. Primary texts include visual as well as literary forms. A selection of secondary materials will help to gloss their formal, thematic, and ideological characteristics while giving students a taste of contemporary theory in such areas as gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.  Possible works (still to be determined) include fiction by Cristina García, Gish Jen, Jhumpa Lahiri, Deborah Eisenberg, and Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative by Lynda Barry; a play by Annie Baker; experimental, autobiographical works by Claudia Rankine and Maggie Nelson; a film by Lebanese-American director Rola Nashef; images by South African photographer Zanele Muholi. Among our likely concerns will be the juxtaposition of verbal and visual elements in a single text; depictions of queer, raced, immigrant, and transnational subjectivities; narratives that make “truth claims” and how such claims affect the reader; representations of growing up, aging, migration, maternity, violence, marriage, creativity, diverse sexualities, and work; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, class, and race.  One project of the course will be to explore its own premise that “women’s texts” is a useful and meaningful category. Two papers and a final exam. This course is intended for 3rd- and 4th-year English majors or other advanced students with a background in literary/cultural/gender studies.

ENGL 4560-003 - Caribbean Sci-Fi and Fantasy

MW 200-315 (Bryan 310)
Njelle Hamilton

Superheroes, space operas, time travel, futuristic tech — the stuff of dreams and the subject of countless popular literary and cultural works over the past century. Far too long featuring mainly white male heroes and US or European settings, sci-fi and fantasy (SF/F) have become increasingly diverse in recent years, even as reframed definitions open up archives of previously overlooked black and brown genre writing from across the globe. Still, the Caribbean is often ignored, imagined either as a rustic beach or a technological backwater. In this undergraduate seminar, however, you will encounter Caribbean writers working at the cutting edge of SF/F, and discover novels, stories, artwork and film that center Caribbean settings, peoples, and culture, even as they expand the definition of genre. Authors and auteurs from the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean might include: Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, Junot Díaz, Rita Indiana, Marcia Douglas, Ernest Pepin, René Depestre, and Agustín de Rojas. We will also discuss supporting turns by Caribbean actors in mainstream works such as Stargate SG-1 and Black Panther. Assignments will include short critical essays and a long research paper where you think through how Caribbean texts redefine, expand, or critique mainstream SF/F.  Meets the Second writing requirement.

ENGL 4561-001 - Dramas of the Future

MW 500-615 (Maury 113)
Kelly Shermeyer

This course covers plays and performances that envision the future of human society and the planet, looking at works by a range of contemporary writers and performers, such as Caryl Churchill, Karel Čapek, Manjula Padmanabhan, Jennifer Haley, and Janelle Monáe. How do playwrights represent massive issues such as climate change or globalization on the (relatively) small space of a stage? How does the development of new narrative technologies affect the kinds of stories theater makers can tell about our world, or questions they can ask about our future? The class focuses on five plays as case studies, augmented with short units on other performance traditions (including robot theater and Afrofuturism), relevant critical essays, and workshops with local theater makers. Course requirements include several short papers and performance reviews, presentations, lively participation in class, and a larger final research project (with creative options).

ENGL 4561-002 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry

TR 330-445 (Maury 113)
Mark Edmundson

Reading, interpretation and appreciation of a span of Anglo-American poets who wrote between the 1950s and the present. Possible authors: Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Adrienne Rich,Gwendolyn Brooks, Amy Clampitt, Philip Larkin, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Wanda Coleman, and John Ashbery. We'll also pick two or three full volumes by contemporaries--possibilities include Terrence Hayes, Mary Szybist, Frederick Seidel, and Ross Gay. Students will be involved in the choice of these books. This is a course for students with a solid background in the reading and interpretation of poems.

ENGL 4561-003 - Poetry in a Global Age

MW 200-315 (Lower West Oval Room 102)
Jahan Ramazani

How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. The writers we will read range from modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Kolatkar, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, and Daljit Nagra. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; co-leading of discussion; and two substantial papers involving research and close reading. Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical texts.

ENGL 4561-004 - The Global City: New York, Los Angeles, London and more

TR 1230-145 (Bryan 235)
Sandhya Shukla

This course explores the representation and social life of the global city.  We look at cities that have been made by flows -- of people, capital and ideas -- and that function more as global, rather than national, or regional spaces.  And we explore how key historical experiences, of war, colonialism, capitalism, and migration have shaped what we think of as modern (and postmodern) metropoles.  We consider cultural exchange as a major theme of novels and films, and also interrogate class, racial and ethnic stratification that challenges any simple notion of community.  With a rigorous interdisciplinary approach, we ask questions about form, of both the texts and the cities themselves. Though we will center our semester’s discussions on three major global cities, New York, Los Angeles and London, we will also broaden our inquiry at times to consider other actual and imagined urban formations.  And to deepen our understanding of the global city, we will interrogate the constitutive terms through an engagement with critical theory on space, difference and encounter.  With so many different themes and sub-themes, ranging widely across regions and nations, our work in seminar scratches the surface of the topic of the global city; but students’ individual research and writing projects will expand on approaches and materials related to the course.

ENGL 4561-005 - Literature and Human Rights

MW 200-315 (New Cabell 594)
Christopher Krentz

What does literature have to do with human rights, with the aspirational effort to ensure the protection of persons everywhere from persecution and deprivation?  In this course we will begin by considering the history of human rights, including debates over their legitimacy.  Then we will study recent theory on the relationship of rights to literature and read a variety of relevant contemporary fiction.  The syllabus is still under construction, but possibilities here include Danticat’s The Farming of Bones, Coetzee’s Disgrace, Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost, Sinha’s Animal’s People, Abani’s Song for Night, and Sacco’s graphic novel Palestine.  These works often deal with difficult, troubling topics, but they do so with grace and occasionally unexpected beauty.  Requirements include careful preparation and active participation, concise Collab Forum posts, quizzes, a 5-page paper, and a 10-page research paper. 

ENGL 4570 - James Baldwin

R 330-600 (Astronomy 265 - may move to Central Grounds)
Marlon Ross

This seminar focuses on the tumultuous life and diverse works of James Baldwin, whose intellectual influence is still palpable in today’s discourses about race, sexuality, social activism, national belonging, and exile. We’ll study major works from each of the genres that Baldwin engaged, including the novel, short story, drama, poetry, journalism, and the essay. In addition to Baldwin’s works, we’ll explore him as a “spokesman” of the Civil Rights movement, and how his high visibility as a public intellectual whose appearances on the new medium of television helped to shape his “celebrity” status. Among the works to be examined are the novels Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953), Giovannis Room (1956), and Just Above My Head (1979); plays The Amen Corner (1954) and Blues for Mr. Charlie (1964); selected poems from Jimmys Blues (1983); selected short stories from Going to Meet the Man (1965); essays from Notes of a Native Son (1955), Nobody Knows My Name (1961), No Name in the Street (1972), and The Devil Finds Work (1976); and the children’s book Little Man Little Man: A Story of Childhood (1976). To comprehend Baldwin’s impact in his time and in our own, we’ll sample some works where his influence is especially compelling, including: Eldridge Cleaver’s Soul on Ice (1965); eulogies for Baldwin by Toni Morrison and Ossie Davis (1987); Darieck Scott’s 1996 novel Traitor to the Race; Ta-Nehisi Coates’ 2015 nonfiction book Between the World and Me; the documentary film I Am Not Your Negro (2017); the 2018 feature film based on his 1976 novel If Beale Street Could Talk; and a variety of critical essays on Baldwin’s works. Assignments include: two short critical essays, a team class presentation, and a final research paper.

ENGL 4580-001 - Aesthetics and Politics

MW 330-445 (Bryan 332)
Rita Felski

This course considers the relationship between aesthetics and politics via a survey of key terms in literature and the visual arts, including realism, modernism, the avant-garde, kitsch, camp, postmodernism, and the sublime. Other topics to be discussed include the museum, the role of race and gender in aesthetics, old and new directions in the sociology of literature and art, and the recent “return to beauty.” 

ENGL 4580-002 - Race in American Places

T 500-730 (Shannon 109 - may move to Central Grounds)
Ian Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar uses the method of Critical Landscape Analysis to explore how everyday places and spaces, “landscapes,” are involved in the negotiation of power in American society.  Landscapes, as we engage the idea, may encompass seemingly private spaces (within the walls of a suburban bungalow or of a government subsidized apartment) to seemingly public spaces (the vest pocket park in lower Manhattan where the Occupy Movement was launched in September 2011; the Downtown Mall, with its many privately operated outdoor cafés, that occupy the path along which East Main Street once flowed freely in Charlottesville; or even the space of invisible AM and FM radio waves that the FCC supposedly regulates in the public’s interest).  We launch our exploration by considering landscapes as arenas of the Culture Wars.  With this context, we unearth ways in which places are planned, designed, constructed, and mythologized in the struggle to assert and enforce social (especially racial) distinctions, difference, and hierarchy.  You will be moved to understand how publicly financed freeways were planned not only to facilitate some citizens’ modern progress, but also to block others from  accessing rights, protections, and opportunities to which casually we believe all "Americans" are entitled.  We study landscapes not only as represented in written and non-written forms, but also through direct sensory, emotional, and intellectual experience during two mandatory field trips to places in our region.  In addition to informal group exercises and individual mid-term exam, critical field trip reflection paper, and final exam, you are required to complete in small groups a final research project on a topic you choose that relates to the seminar.  Past topics have ranged from the racial politics of farmers’ markets in gentrifying inner cities to the gender--and the transgender exclusion—politics of  universal standards for public restroom pictograms.  Students showcase such results in an informal symposium that culminates the semester.  Not only will you expand the complexity and scope of your critical thinking abilities, but also you will never again experience as ordinary the spaces and places you encounter from day to day.

ENGL 4590 - Nineteenth Century Novels Up Close and Philosophical

TR 1230-145 (Bryan 334)
Karen Chase

We will concentrate on three great novels of the Nineteenth Century: Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Eliot’s Middlemarch. Our aim is to examine how these authors and works approach life’s big questions: meaning, purpose, vocation, ethics, pleasure. There is no didactic intent or doctrinal pursuit: our investigations are philosophical and literary. We will assume that although fictions are artificial while life is actual, there is yet a certain amount of craft and performance involved in living and (of course) even more in writing. Therefore, it is fair to analyze our own attitudes alongside those we find expressed in each novel and by each author. We study possibilities, images, metaphors and avoid searching for answers or solutions. Be prepared to write thoughtful weekly responses, a seminar paper, and a take home final. There will be weekly reading quizzes.

ENGL 5101 - Beowulf

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 328)
Peter Baker

*ENGL 5559-001 - The Sonnet Revised and Revisited

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 310)
Clare Kinney

Please note: this course may be used to satisfy the pre-1700 requirement (with a slight tweaking of the requirements: see instructor).  

“A chamber of sudden change”; “a meeting place of image and voice”; “a game with mortal stakes”; “the collision of music, desire and argument”: these are some of the ways that poets and critics have described the sonnet. Starting with the Petrarchan experiments of Renaissance Europe and extending our reach through the Romantics & the modernists to Ted Berrigan, Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy, Terrance Hayes and beyond, we will consider the persistence and the many metamorphoses of the form.  Sonnet writers construct a “a moment’s monument” for religious, political, philosophical and meta-poetical purposes as well as to anatomize desire, and when they present sonnets in sequence they make lyric do something of the work of narrative. Every time a poet writes a sonnet he or she becomes part of a very long literary conversation and may make that intervention the occasion to set thought and feeling in a new dialogue, to reconsider “the contradictory impulses of being in the world,” to talk back to tradition, to make the dead speak again, to re-make and re-break the rules of form. Exploring the history, poetics and the race and gender politics of this tenacious short form, we will consider the craftiness of craft and the particular power of “bound language.”  In addition to addressing a wide selection of sonnets written from the 16th century to yesterday, we will also read critical writings on the sonnet by a variety of scholars and poets.   

Requirements: lively participation in discussion; a series of email responses to readings, one 6-7 page paper; a presentation on a contemporary sonnet of your own choice; a substantial final project (critical or hybrid creative- critical).

ENGL 5559-002 - Afterlives of the Epic

MW 1100-1215 (Bryan 233)
Dan Kinney

What becomes of the epic, especially (but not only) in Renaissance England? Where has it been, and where does it still have to go? Why does the most elevated of literary modes in traditional reckonings end up seeming passe or impossible to so many moderns? Works to be read include Homer's epics, The Aeneid, The Inferno, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, The Dunciad, and The Waste Land. Class requirements: lively participation including brief email responses, two shorter or one more substantial term paper, and a final exam.

ENGL 5559-003 - The Queer Novel

MW 500-615 (Wilson 238)
Mrinalini Chakravorty

What is “queer” about the novel?  Our course will grapple with this question by examining the rich legacy of non-normative sexual expressions and orientations in the literary arts.  The aim of the course is—

  1. To understand what constitutes ‘queer literature’ as a meaningful genre or archive.  Is the queer novel unique in its expressivity, in terms of style and content?  Does the queer novel have its own canon?  Should this canon be more open to revision than others given the constant evolutions in how we understand gender?
  2. To see how novels engage political ideas of sexuality germane to thinking about queerness, such as of ‘homophobia,’ the ‘closet,’ 'inversion’ ‘gender bending,’ ‘cis-acting,’ ‘coming out,’ ‘failure,’ ‘deviance,’ ‘camp,’ ‘cruising,’ ‘queer futurity,’ ‘queer feeling,’ ‘homonationalism,’ ‘disidentification,’ ‘performitivity,’ ‘flamboyance,’ etc.  
  3. To confront radical questions about subjectivity and embodiment that the analytic of sexuality enables us to ask about the worlds we inhabit and the texts that represent these worlds.  

To accomplish these goals, we will read sweepingly across the whole breadth of the queer canon.  We will begin with early classics (by Radclyffe Hall, Virginia Woolf, E.M.Forster) of queer literature and then shift our attention to more contemporary transnational contexts concerned with representing queerness as a part of, and not apart from, affiliations of race, culture, religion, geography, class etc.  Our reading includes works by Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Ali Smith, Leslie Feinberg, Michael Cunningham, Shyam Selvadurai, Alison Bechdel, Saleem Haddad, and Shaani Mootoo among others.  In other words, we will think of the important ways that the evolution of the queer novel involves a perpetual re-queering of the genre itself by the insistent heterogeneity of racial, transnational, and transgender contexts.  While most of the novels we read will come from the Anglophone tradition, some will be translated from other languages.

This course will require that students be prepared to engage directly and fearlessly with the field of queer theory.  Queer theory will inform how we contextualize the subcultures of queerness (from Bloomsbury or Stonewall to Queer-of-Color activisms), as well as understand why notions of reproductive normality, eroticism, pleasure, kinship, and indeed queer identity have been transformed in recent literary and aesthetic works.  Ultimately, we will ask how queer aesthetic works speak to, revise, and must be re-evaluated given the shifting dynamics of queer thought.  Here our reading includes work by Michel Foucault, David Halperin, Judith Butler Jasbir Puar, Monique Wittig, Adrienne Rich, Judith Halberstam, Sara Ahmed, Lee Edelman, Jose Munoz,  Marlon Ross, and others.  Finally, a selection of salient films, poems, and short stories will allow us to see useful connections between the aesthetic and political charge—often one of transgression—that the sign of the “queer” carries.

This course is a graduate level course but it can also be taken to satisfy the Modern and Global Studies seminar requirement for undergraduates in that concentration.

ENGL 5559-004 - Contemporary Jewish Fiction

TR 200-315 (Bryan 203)
Caroline Rody

Cross-listed with ENGL 5830.

This course, designed for both graduate students and upper level undergraduates (and which fulfills a requirement for the World Religions, World Literatures M.A. program), will consider the mutual engagement of art and spirit in post-World War II Jewish American literature, a young literature with roots in formidable textual, cultural, and religious traditions.  In the texts of this course we will observe an evolving relationship to traditional Jewish texts and religious practice, to Yiddish and the culture of Yiddishkeit; to memory and inheritance as burdens or as creative touchstones in secular, modern cultural forms, and to forms of Jewish humor and of political vision. At the same time, our syllabus will unfold a drama of Americanization, including changing notions about personal, linguistic, and national identity; about gender roles; and about communal and aesthetic affiliation in a multiethnic society. Several authors take up the difficult project of re-encountering and reframing the Holocaust, in startlingly anti-realist, darkly comic literary visions.  And some practice Jewish writing as rewriting, inscribing themselves in a literary web by reanimating key Jewish texts and writers of the past. A key figure at the course’s opening is the great Yiddish writer Isaac Bashevis Singer. Others who may be read include Grace Paley, Alfred Kazin, Chaim Potok, Elie Wiesel, Lore Segal, Art Spiegelman, Philip Roth, Nathan Englander, Allegra Goodman, and David Bezmozgis. A final unit will focus on the remarkable collective reimagination of the work and life of Polish-Jewish surrealist writer (and Holocaust victim) Bruno Schulz, reconjured into contemporary fiction by writers we will read including Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, Nicole Krauss, and Jonathan Safran Foer.  Texts include short stories, novels, and critical essays. Requirements: all reading, active class participation, co-leading of a class discussion, several short reading responses, a short and a long paper, the latter with creative options.

ENGL 5830 - Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures: Contemporary Jewish Fiction

TR 200-315 (Bryan 203)
Caroline Rody

Cross-listed with ENGL 5559-004.

This course, designed for both graduate students and upper level undergraduates (and which fulfills a requirement for the World Religions, World Literatures M.A. program), will consider the mutual engagement of art and spirit in post-World War II Jewish American literature, a young literature with roots in formidable textual, cultural, and religious traditions.  In the texts of this course we will observe an evolving relationship to traditional Jewish texts and religious practice, to Yiddish and the culture of Yiddishkeit; to memory and inheritance as burdens or as creative touchstones in secular, modern cultural forms, and to forms of Jewish humor and of political vision. At the same time, our syllabus will unfold a drama of Americanization, including changing notions about personal, linguistic, and national identity; about gender roles; and about communal and aesthetic affiliation in a multiethnic society. Several authors take up the difficult project of re-encountering and reframing the Holocaust, in startlingly anti-realist, darkly comic literary visions.  And some practice Jewish writing as rewriting, inscribing themselves in a literary web by reanimating key Jewish texts and writers of the past. A key figure at the course’s opening is the great Yiddish writer Isaac Bashevis Singer. Others who may be read include Grace Paley, Alfred Kazin, Chaim Potok, Elie Wiesel, Lore Segal, Art Spiegelman, Philip Roth, Nathan Englander, Allegra Goodman, and David Bezmozgis. A final unit will focus on the remarkable collective reimagination of the work and life of Polish-Jewish surrealist writer (and Holocaust victim) Bruno Schulz, reconjured into contemporary fiction by writers we will read including Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, Nicole Krauss, and Jonathan Safran Foer.  Texts include short stories, novels, and critical essays. Requirements: all reading, active class participation, co-leading of a class discussion, several short reading responses, a short and a long paper, the latter with creative options.

ENGL 5900 - Counterpoint Seminar in Teaching Modern Literature

M 630-900 (New Cabell 191)
Hallie Richmond

This course is a hands-on, practical seminar for teaching works of complex literature to a varied range of secondary school  pupils. The purpose of the course is to provide participants with an opportunity to read classic texts that are frequently taught in the high school English classroom—or that provide context for such—and apply pedagogical strategies that reflect best practices in English education to allow for students of all reading levels to access these texts. As a "Counterpoint Seminar," this course asks students to combine skills in reading and writing developed from previous literature classes with their emerging pedagogical skills. It also asks students to reflect critically on their own strengths and weaknesses as readers of literature, with an eye toward expanding the repertoire of interpretive strategies at their disposal as English educators.

Writing and Rhetoric

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II

Fall Semesters

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

Spring 2020:

001 - Writing about Identities
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 038)
Kate Kostelnik

002 - Writing about Identities
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 312)
Claire Chantell

003 - Writing about Identities
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 312)
Claire Chantell

004 - Writing about Culture and Society
MWF 1200-1250 (Bryan 203)
Patricia Sullivan

006 - Writing about Culture and Society
MWF 100-150 (Bryan 203)
Patricia Sullivan

007 - Writing about Identities
TR 930-1045 (Ruffner 125)
Marcus Meade

008 - Writing about Identities
TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 038)
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 1508 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II for Multilingual Writers

Offers instruction in academic writing, critical inquiry, and the conventions of American English for non-native speakers of English. Space is limited, and priority is given to students who are required to take the sequence by recommendation of the admissions office, the transition program, or the writing program.

Section 001 TR 1100-1215 (Ruffner 125)
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

Section 002 TR 330-445 (New Cabell 038)
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry

Please see the Spring 2020 courses page on the Writing and Rhetoric website, here.

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1520-001 - Writing and Community Engagement: Food Justice

TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 211)
Kate Stephenson

Why do we eat what we eat? Do poor people eat more fast food than wealthy people? Why do men like to eat steak more than women? Why are Cheetos cheaper than cherries? Do you have to be skinny to be hungry? By volunteering at Loaves and Fishes or The Haven and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like hunger stereotypes, privilege, food insecurity, food production, and community engagement.

In this course, I will encourage you to think critically, see writing as an act of discovery, and realize that writing matters beyond the classroom. By the end of the course you will be able to…

  • identify the parts of an argument in different writing genres.
  • incorporate foundational knowledge about both writing and food insecurity to compose clear, effective arguments.
  • generate, refine, and share your own questions about readings, service experiences, and writing topics.
  • connect and apply academic course content to service experiences.
  • articulate an awareness of social justice issues in Charlottesville and beyond.
  • interact in the community with compassion, empathy, humility, and respect.
  • design and create a final project in collaboration with a community partner that can be used by Loaves and Fishes, The Haven, or Madison House.
  • reflect on your own learning to develop a sense of civic responsibility and a writing personality you can take with you beyond the classroom.

Community Partners—Loaves and Fishes or The Haven

All students will have the opportunity to volunteer weekly with Loaves and Fishes (LF) or The Haven (H). Scheduling, including time slots and transportation, will be coordinated with the help of the professor and Madison House.

ENWR 1520-002 - Writing and Community Engagement: Food Justice

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 211)
Kate Stephenson

Why do we eat what we eat? Do poor people eat more fast food than wealthy people? Why do men like to eat steak more than women? Why are Cheetos cheaper than cherries? Do you have to be skinny to be hungry? By volunteering at PB&J Fund or PVCC Community Garden and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like hunger stereotypes, privilege, food insecurity, food production, and community engagement.

In this course, I will encourage you to think critically, see writing as an act of discovery, and realize that writing matters beyond the classroom. By the end of the course you will be able to…

  • identify the parts of an argument in different writing genres.
  • incorporate foundational knowledge about both writing and food insecurity to compose clear, effective arguments.
  • generate, refine, and share your own questions about readings, service experiences, and writing topics.
  • connect and apply academic course content to service experiences.
  • articulate an awareness of social justice issues in Charlottesville and beyond.
  • interact in the community with compassion, empathy, humility, and respect.
  • design and create a final project in collaboration with a community partner that can be used by PB&J Fund, PVCC Community Garden, or Madison House.
  • reflect on your own learning to develop a sense of civic responsibility and a writing personality you can take with you beyond the classroom.

Community Partners—PB&J Fund or PVCC Community Garden

All students will have the opportunity to volunteer weekly with PB&J Fund (PBJ) or PVCC Community Garden (CG). Scheduling, including time slots and transportation, will be coordinated with the help of the professor and Madison House.

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar (5 Sections)

001 - Writing about the Arts
TR 1100-1215 (Cocke Hall 101)
Charity Fowler

002 - Writing about Science and Technology
MW 500-615 (New Cabell 187)
Kenny Fountain

003 - Writing about Culture and Society
MW 200-315 (Bryan 312)
Kevin Smith

005 - Writing about Culture and Society
MW 330-445 (Bryan 312)
Kevin Smith

006
M 600-830 (New Cabell 036)
Stephen Parks

ENWR 2520-001 - Special Topics in Writing

MW 330-445 (Bryan 203)
Patricia Sullivan

ENWR 2520-007 - Writing about & with Film

MW 330-445 (Bryan 310)
Sarah O'Brien

ENWR 2520-009 - Science Communications

MWF 100-150 (Bryan 332)
Kiera Allison

ENWR 2520-010 - Writing Across Cultures

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 283)
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

Section 001
TR 800-915 (The Rotunda 152)
Instructor: Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

Section 002
TR 930-1045 (The Rotunda 152)
Instructor: Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking (3 sections)

An inquiry-based approach to the development of a confident, engaging, and ethical public speaking style. Beyond practical skills, this course emphasizes rhetorical thinking: what are the conventions of public speaking? Where are there opportunities to deviate from convention in ways that might serve a speech's purpose? How might we construct an audience through the ways we craft language and plan the delivery of our speech?

Section 001
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

Section 002
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

Section 003
TR 1100-1215 (Shannon 108)
Instructor: Megan Haury

ENWR 3500-001 - Black Women's Writing and Rhetoric

TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 042)
Tamika Carey

This class is a chronological survey of the persuasive strategies Black women have used for the project of empowerment and activism in their speeches, essays, poetry, drama, novels, and other writings. Students will learn rhetorical theory from writers such as Jacqueline Jones Royster, Gwendolyn Pough, and Elaine Richardson and apply these theories to the political writings of figures such as Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Fannie Lou Hamer and book-length works such as Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls, and Brittney Cooper’s Eloquent Rag: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower. Assignments include: an essay exam, a rhetorical analysis paper, a class presentation, and a final project.

ENWR 3500-002 - Writing about Climate: Climate Swerve

TR 930-1045 (Shannon 107)
Cory Shaman, Jennifer Moody

ENWR 3660 - Travel Writing

TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 489)
Instructor: Kate Stephenson

Why is everyone suddenly going to Iceland? Why do we travel? What is the difference between a traveler and a tourist?  Using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore the world of travel writing.  Since we all write best about subjects and ideas we are passionate about, we will work together to generate interesting questions about the role of travel in our culture, as well as about specific books and essays. We will also investigate the world of tourism and consider the many ethical issues that arise in the exploration of our modern world. Throughout the course, we will ponder questions like:

  • What is the relationship between travel writer, reader, and inhabitant? How can we use writing to navigate the relationship between writer, reader, inhabitant, and place?
  • What is the role of “outsider” in travel writing?
  • How does travel writing encourage us to see ourselves differently?
  • How can we use the very best of travel writing—the sense of discovery, voice, narrative suspense—in other forms of writing, including academic essays?
  • Can travel writing evoke political and social change?

As the semester unfolds, I hope we will revise and refine our views, paying close attention to how we put words together to write powerfully and engagingly about travel.

ENWR 3900 - Career-Based Writing and Rhetoric

MW 200-315 (Ruffner 125)
John Casteen

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design. (Meets second writing requirement.)

Courses Outside the Department of English

English majors are permitted to take two courses outside of the department for elective credit, with prior approval.  Please contact Carl Stukenborg at cjs3cu@virginia.edu to receive English major credit if you enroll in one of these courses. 

GETR 3590 - Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 395)
Benjamin Bennett

The course will deal with the ethical aspect of the writing of all three authors.  A special focus of the discussion will be the question of the ethics of writing.  Suppose the category of truth has become problematic, and along with it the idea that a writer’s whole ethical obligation it to the truth.  Are there then any curbs at all on what authors may permit themselves? The main texts that will be read in the course include:  Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, and The Antichrist; Freud, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Civilization and Its Discontents, and Moses and Monotheism; and Kafka, The Trial, plus some stories.  There will be two writing assignments:  one relatively short essay around midterm on an assigned topic; one longer essay (ca. ten pages) on a topic chosen by the student.  The course will satisfy the second writing requirement.

RUTR 3400 - Nabokov

TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 338)
Julian Connolly

This course will offer a close look a the intriguing literary legacy of Vladimir Nabokov, beginning with his early experiments in the short story form and tracing his artistic growth through such novels as Despair, Lolita, and Pale Fire.  The course will investigate Nabokov's place in the Russian literary tradition as well as his links to other modern writers such as Kafka and Joyce.  We shall also consider the development of the so-called "Lolita phenomenon" in popular culture and media.

All readings are in English

Undergraduate Courses