Undergraduate Course Descriptions | Fall 2021

Courses

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing (7 Sections)

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements. 

002
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM

003
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM

004
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM

007
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM

008
TR 03:30PM-04:45PM

ENCW 2560-001 - Literary Science Fiction

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Jeb Livingood

ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing (6 Sections)

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.

002
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

003
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM

004
MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

007
TR 05:00PM-06:15PM

008
MW 09:30AM-10:45AM BRN 233

ENCW 3310-001 - Intermediate Poetry Writing I [Please apply; Instructor Permission required]

W 02:00PM-04:30PM
Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises, relevant outside reading, and class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry and poetic craft.  Short papers, participation in one group presentation, attendance at 2 poetry readings and a final poetry portfolio will be required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu .  Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 3559 - Storytelling and Performance Prose

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM
Anna Beecher

This course is for students with experience of writing creatively, interested in writing fiction and other texts to be spoken aloud, embodied and shared with others in real time. Over the semester you will develop original stories, work on putting them ‘up on their feet’ in performance and explore how liveness and orality can challenge, shape and invigorate writing. We will also touch upon the oral roots of literature, reading works such as the 1001 Nights and the stories collected by the Brothers Grimm and the texts they have inspired. We will read, watch and discuss works of fiction, live-art, narrative comedy, spoken word and drama. You may be a fiction writer, interested in how spoken stories could attune your ear for language and narrative pattern, or writer and performer interested in marrying those two passions. Performance experience is not a requirement for this class, but a willingness to explore performance in a supportive atmosphere is essential. 

Admission by Instructor Permission. Please send a sample of your prose writing (5-10 pages) and a brief statement (1 page max) about why this course interests you to am2aw@virginia.edu.

ENCW 3610-001 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

R 02:00PM-04:30PM
Micheline Marcom

ENCW 3610-002 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

T 05:00PM-07:30PM
Elizabeth Denton

ENCW 4350 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing: The Truthful Imaginarium

M 02:00PM-04:30PM
Jane Alison

Instructor Permission Required.

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to explore how the personal essay dwells at the rich interface between their own minds and the world: that is, how their personal sensibility or “imaginarium” casts light, darkness, and color upon what they see and write. You’ll cycle through a series of micro-essays in which you’ll write about single subjects—an object, perhaps, or a room, color, plant, moment, person, animal—drawing both on your most inventively associative mind and on researchable or verifiable information. Then, working from these short pieces, you’ll develop a single long personal essay that will be a literary site of imaginative but truthful exploration, inward and out. Most of this writing will be considered and discussed by the group, of course. Along the way you’ll also read many short examples of inventive, revelatory writing by writers such as Eula Biss, Brian Blanchfield, Jenny Boully, Garnette Cadogan, Anne Carson, John D’Agata, Annie Dillard, Maria Gainza, Han Kang, Dinty Moore, Jericho Parms, Lia Purpura, and Richard Selzer. To be considered for this class, be a serious and imaginative writer and send me a short sample of your work (jas2ad@virginia.edu).

ENCW 4550-001 - Boxcutters: Narrative Experiments

W 02:00PM-04:30PM
Jane Alison

In this seminar we’ll explore writing that punctures “traditional” envelopes and ignores expectations of, say, classic realist prose. A memoir made of unlinked sentences; a novel in a box whose chapters you can read in any order; a personal essay in verse; a novella in numbered lines . . . “A Fictional Essay in 29 Tangos” (by Anne Carson) could be a catchphrase for the sort of work we’ll consider. How can windows open in what we write, whether working closer to the truthful or the imaginative ends of the spectrum, whether creating literature that’s more like music or more like a painting? When are experiments unreadable or soulless? In addition to weekly reading, you’ll write-play with regular exercises and produce a final critical-creative project. Among the authors we might read: Walter Abish, César Aira, Jenny Boully, Italo Calvino, Anne Carson, B. S. Johnson, Han Kang, John Keene, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Edouard Levé, Clarice Lispector, David Markson, Ander Monson, Marie Ndiaye, Dorthe Nors, Marie Redonnet, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute, Walter Sukenick, Eliot Weinberger.

Unless you are in the APLP, instructor permission required: please send me (jas2ad@virginia.edu) a note saying who you are and what draws you to this course, along with a writing sample (ten pages max).

ENCW 4810-001 - Advanced Fiction Writing I

TR 11:00am-12:15pm (New Cabell Hall 066)
Rabih Alameddine

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. In addition to applying via SIS, please send a note (LRS9E@VIRGINIA.EDU) saying who you are, what workshops you've taken, and what draws you to this one. Attach to your email a 10-page writing sample. The instructor expects to read applications and admit the class by mid-August.

ENCW 4820-001 - Poetry Program Poetics - Modern :: Postmodern

W 02:00PM-04:30PM
Brian Teare

One hundred years ago, literature was in the middle of a revolution, a transformational time of cultural critique and formal experiment that kept pace with pointed social reappraisals of gender, Blackness, and sexuality. The 1920s in particular saw the publication of books central to our thinking about Modernism in English: from T.S. Eliot’s 1922 The Waste Land & Other Poems to Jean Toomer’s 1927 Cane, as well as Marianne Moore’s Observations, Langston Hughes’s The Weary Blues, Hart Crane’s White Buildings, Laura Riding’s The Close Chaplet, and many others. This course looks back to the 1920s from 2021 and asks: in what ways does the modern linger on in the postmodern? How has Modernist thinking about gender, Blackness, and sexuality influenced our own thinking? How has Modernist poetry in English influenced the forms explored and employed by contemporary USAmerican poetry? How can Modernist experiments be useful to us in the digital era? To help us answer these questions, we’ll read six Modernist classics in tandem with six books by contemporary poets whose work demonstrates both obvious and not-so-obvious formal and thematic engagements with poets from the 1920s. Throughout the semester we’ll engage in short critical and creative responses to these books, and for our final projects we’ll each write poems in dialogue with a Modernist predecessor whose poetics we find inspiring, challenging – and perhaps also infuriating!

ENCW 4830-001 - Advanced Poetry Writing I: Counter-Desecration

T 02:00PM-04:30PM
Brian Teare

This advanced poetry workshop will encourage us to use words to counter the desecration of the world. Guided by the collectively authored lexical experiment Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, our work together will include creating our own collective poetic lexicon that treats “words as portals to new species of wisdom.” We will also immerse ourselves in intersectional poetries that a) aim to counter the ruin of our planet and the commons of air and water and land we share with more-than-human beings, and b) defend our communities, quality of life, and psyches from further racist, misogynist, and homo- and transphobic harm. Rooted in ecologies biological and social and cultural, these poetries highlight the home in oikos and the making in poiesis and document the work it takes to make a home here in all its wonderful, awful complexity. Poets like CAConrad, Ross Gay, Brenda Hillman, Tommy Pico, Paisley Rekdal, Danielle Vogel, and Asiya Wadud foster and tend texts whose deep roots in multiple networks of relation work against the forces that attempt to unroot us. During the semester’s first half we’ll workshop short poems written in response to prompts designed to help us define our own sense of oikos, while the final workshop portion of the course will offer each of us the chance to expand upon that definition in longer manuscripts. Throughout the semester, in both critical discussions and workshops, we’ll discuss the conceptual, political, and poetic aspirations of the work we read, and explore the possibilities of coming together as poets to counter the violence around us.

Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Email your application as a single document to the instructor. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be noon, August 5. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold space for transfer and study abroad students. The instructor will let all applicants know by late August.

English Literature

ENGL 2500 - Intro to Postcolonial Theory

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM
Tracey Wang

What is postcolonial theory? What does it mean to analyze literary texts through a postcolonial lens? How does the study of anti- and post-colonial theory affect our reading practices? This course will consider some foundational works of anticolonial and postcolonial theory alongside contemporary literary works that grapple with the histories and politics of settler colonialism, imperialism, and racial capitalism. The course will begin with the major writings of four critical theorists (Césaire, Memmi, Fanon, and Said) in order to give you a sense of the political, intellectual, and cultural debates that have shaped the theoretical discourses within the field of postcolonial studies. We will use their works as touchstones to examine the ideas and concepts in the narratives and prose of contemporary writers. Together, these texts will give you the conceptual framework to think through and question global structures of power and domination.

ENGL 2502-001 - Jane Austen Jumps the Shark

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Brad Pasanek

This study of Jane Austen’s afterlife finds the Regency author on water-skis. An introduction to the major, the course aims at formal analyses of Austen’s novels, queries the concept of fiction, and presents the rudiments of literary theory. The student must be prepared to confront unpardonable adaptations of adaptations of adaptations. Common side effects may include getting sopping wet in the horse-pond, meme-ifcation, zombies, fic, and queer theory

To be sure, we will be reading Austen meticulously, our other authors closely but more quickly. Of prevailing concern will be contemporary uses and reworkings of Austen: her screen adaptations, her commodification, and the many parodic uses to which her fictions have been put, online and off. 

ENGL 2506-001 - The Challenge of Poetry

TR 3:30PM-4:45PM
Matthew Martello

Is it true what they say—that poetry is “hard”? If so, how so? What should we do about it? This course will investigate the concept, the quality, and the experience of “difficulty” as it attaches to the literary work in general—and poetry in particular. We’ll tackle together some of the most notoriously “difficult” poems in the English language, locating problems, troubleshooting solutions, and developing a repertoire of analytical skills (e.g., scansion, recitation, interpretive reading, historical contextualization) fit for the toughest challenges culture has to offer. At every turn we’ll be guided by one question: In a world full of more accessible entertainments, *why* would we opt for the patient and sometimes strenuous attention demanded by great poetry?

No prior experience with poetic analysis, no particular fondness for the difficult, only interest and occasional energy are required!

Readings will include poems by William Blake, Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, John Ashbery, Ai, and others. Grades/assignments will include regular, often collaborative class participation and written responses of various lengths and kinds.

ENGL 2506-002 - Introduction to Poetry

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM
Walter Jost

Mindful of your own words? Intrigued by what seems designed to confuse you? Summoned by some spirit? Skeptical about the cash value of reading poetry in a world of internet memes and Breaking News? This introductory course invites you to talk through shared intuitions, hesitations, doubts, and hopes with like-minded others. The semester is centered on close reading and class discussion of selected American poets. One-paragraph responses for class preparation, and three five-page papers. Meets Second Writing Requirement.

ENGL 2506-003 - Contemporary Poetry

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Jahan Ramazani

In this seminar for first-year students not required to take ENWR 1510, we will examine an array of postwar idioms, forms, and movements. While devoting much of our attention to some of the most influential poetry from the second half of the twentieth century, we will also bring ourselves up to date by examining some of the best poems published in recent years by poets of diverse backgrounds. To hone our attention, we will focus on several specific genres, forms, or kinds of poetry, including sonnets, elegies, and poems about the visual arts. The seminar will emphasize the development of skills of close reading, critical thinking, and imaginative, knowledgeable writing about poetry.

ENGL 2506-004 - Introduction to Renaissance Poetry

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Rebecca Rush

I learned from him, that poetry, even that of the loftiest and, seemingly, that of the wildest odes, had a logic of its own, as severe as that of science; and more difficult, because more subtle, more complex, and dependent on more, and more fugitive causes.

--S.T. Coleridge, Biographia Literaria

What is a poem? How does it work? How do we understand the connections between a poem’s formal elements (rhyme, meter, enjambment, etc.) and what Renaissance writers called its “conceit”—its governing ideas and images? In this course, we will explore the many Renaissance responses to these questions by reading poems by William Shakespeare, John Donne, Mary Wroth, Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, John Milton, and Katherine Philips.

This course is a guide to the art of reading poetry. Like any art, poetic reading requires training and practice. We will move slowly at first, sometimes reading only one poem per class, and will work together to develop the interpretive skills needed to unfold a poem. This course will also help you sharpen your skills as a writer. The first written assignments will be short, observational readings of poems that you will then turn into structured, argument-based papers. You will have the opportunity to revise one paper based on feedback from your instructor and your classmates.

No prior knowledge of poetry, meter, or rhyme is expected. Lovers and haters of poetry are equally welcome. (I love a challenge!) The only prerequisite is a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary.

ENGL 2508-001 - Otherworlds

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Peter Baker

An “Otherworld” is an alternative world parallel to ours. In ancient times it could be Mount Olympus, the dwelling of the gods, or the Underworld, the land of the dead. In the Middle Ages it was “Faerie,” the land of fairies. In modern literature, the most famous example is the magical world that exists alongside the Muggle world of the Harry Potter series, but it can be a distant galaxy, a parallel universe, a virtual reality, or any isolated location where the usual rules don’t apply. In this course we’ll look briefly at several Otherworlds from antiquity to Alice in Wonderland, and then move on to four modern novels. These have yet to be chosen, but past selections have included Neil Gaiman, Neverwhere; Ursula Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness; Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go; and Victor LaValle, The Changeling. I will choose three novels and the class will choose the fourth. Work for this course will include frequent posts in the class forum, three formal papers, group presentations, and a final exam.

ENGL 2508-002 - American Environmental Fiction

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Mary Kuhn

In 1962, Rachel Carson’s bestseller Silent Spring launched the modern environmental movement by explaining how pesticides and other chemicals harmed humans, animals, and plants across America. But she began her book with a fiction, a “fable for tomorrow”— an imaginary town in which no birds sing, streams are lifeless, and vegetation withers.

In this course, we’ll ask: what is the relationship between environmental fiction and environmental reality? How do ideas about the environment guide our daily lives? In 2020, a disease that spread from animals to humans is upending society. How can literature help us understand and appreciate our relationship to the world around us? And how can literature sustain us in this period of uncertainty?

ENGL 2508-003 - The Science Fiction Novel

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Patricia Sullivan

Like to sink into a book that challenges the ways we think about other worlds, technology and science at their best and worst, parallel universes, speculative futures, human, aliens, artificial intelligences, cyborgs and more? We will read several books that are classified loosely as science fiction, though there may be some overlap with other genres such speculative fiction or climate fiction. Along the way, we will consider key novelistic conventions and aspects of the genre, questions of social relevance (science fiction is often read allegorically) and other various ways of interpreting the past, present, and future of science fiction.

We will also practice close reading strategies, reflect on acts of literary interpretation through brief references to critical essays, inquire into some of the functions and effects of fictional narratives, and grapple with imaginative representations of worlds and times similar and not so similar to our own. Students will write regular reading responses and exploratory pieces, lead seminar discussions in groups, write three short essays, and take a brief final exam.

This course fulfills the second writing (or writing-enhanced) requirement. ENGL 2508 also prepares students interested in the English major for upper-level coursework in literature, though all majors are welcome.

ENGL 2508-004 - Gender and the Gothic

TR 2:00PM-3:15PM
Cristina Griffin

In this class, we will read (and watch) stories that engage with the long tradition of the gothic: stories that are pleasurably thrilling, that structure themselves around suspense, secrecy, romance, intrigue, and even sometimes fear. We will begin the term by focusing on some of the eighteenth-century texts that established and popularized the gothic conventions that novelists, filmmakers, and television writers still use today. We will then turn to more contemporary reactions to the gothic, investigating how twentieth- and twenty-first-century forms respond to the gothic genre. Our focus as we make our way across the centuries will be on how these stories open up questions about gender. How do gothic texts represent women’s bodies? What is the relationship between gender and violence? How do gendered portrayals of the gothic change over time or embody different political and cultural crises? How do popular contemporary forms—the television show, the dystopian novel—reimagine the gothic? 

UVA is the ideal place to study gothic literature, since it houses the world’s largest collection of gothic fiction. We will immerse ourselves in this vast treasure trove with an archival project in which you will become an expert on a gothic novel, and contribute your findings to a digital companion to the archive. No library or research experience necessary: we will be working from the ground up as you learn to give these important gothic texts new lives in the twenty-first century.

ENGL 2508-007 - The Novel of Upbringing

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Dan Kinney

How does the fictional representation of upbringing reflect on the cultural uses of fiction in general as well as the actual work of becoming adult? Works to be studied: Jane Austen, Emma; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Michael Malone, Handling Sin. Class requirements: Lively participation including including 8 brief email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.

ENGL 2527-001 - Text and Performance

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Katharine Maus

In this course we will read three Shakespeare plays and then see two or three film or live-theater versions of each one, considering various ways the directors and actors interpret the plays for a modern audience. Writing assignments are designed to help seminar participants consolidate the analytical and writing skills they need to succeed in college-level classes in English or other humanities fields. In addition to many short, informal writing assignments there will be two formal papers—one short, one longer.

ENGL 2527-002 - Shakespeare and Desire

TR 3:30PM-4:45PM
Alexandra Kennedy

“The sea hath bounds, but deep desire hath none,” remarks Venus to her beloved Adonis in Shakespeare’s eponymous poem. In this course, you will explore Shakespeare’s portrayal of desire in its broadest sense – from the love and lust that Venus cites, to the desire for power, and the problem of desiring something lost. We will read Shakespeare’s verse – including two long poems and a selection of sonnets – and several plays. Guiding questions for our class include: do Shakespeare’s poems speak about desire differently than his plays? How do some subgenres – tragedy, comedy, romance – structure the way that Shakespeare depicts desire? How do issues of age, social station, gender, race, and sexuality inflect discourses of desire across Shakespeare’s works? Shakespeare novices and Shakespeare fans, English majors and non-majors are all welcome. Willingness to close-read Shakespeare’s language (with the aid of a dictionary), to consider interpretative choices in performance, and to engage thoughtfully in discussion are a must. Requirements will include several brief written responses, two longer essays, and lively class participation.

ENGL 2560-001 - Contemporary Literature & the Internet

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Anastatia Curley

This course will investigate the relationship between contemporary literature and internet culture. We’ll consider how literature represents digital media, and how new media influence 21st century literature, both formally and thematically. We’ll explore a number of questions: does the convergence of literature and new media change how we think about or engage with either? Does it complicate our understanding of the difference between “high” and “low” culture, the literary and the popular? What forms of connection and engagement does the internet offer us, and how do they compare to those that literature promises? What is the emotional landscape of the internet? Does reading novels make us more empathetic? Does our use of social media change our relationship to fictional characters? We’ll consider these and other questions as we read and analyze novels, poetry, graphic narratives, and experimental prose.

As a 2000-level English course, this class prepares students for upper-level coursework in literature, but welcomes non-majors curious about new media, popular culture, and literature. IT also satisfies the second writing requirement. Writing assignments will range from short, informal pieces to a formal research paper, and possibly include a multimodal writing project such as a podcast. 

Texts will (mostly) be drawn from the following list:

Americanah, Chimamanda Adichie
Agency or The Peripheral, William Gibson
Super Sad True Love Story, Gary Shteyngart
Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Ta-Nehisi Coates
Marvel’s Black Panther
Twitter fiction by Teju Cole, Jennifer Egan, David Mitchell
Milk and Honey, Rupi Kaur
Citizen, Claudia Rankine

ENGL 2560-002 - Trans Poetry & Poetics

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Austyn James

This course investigates the idea of ‘trans poetry’: What does it mean? What does it look like? Does such a thing even exist? Together, we will explore the formal and stylistic qualities of trans-identified poetry from the last decade or so by carefully studying individual poems as well as theoretical statements about poetry (i.e. poetics). While a few key figures will center our syllabus and discussions, we’ll also be reading broadly as we take up particular themes (e.g. nature, identity, history). Overall, this course is intended to introduce you to the styles, themes, and concerns that make up the vibrant world of trans poetry and poetics.

If this is your first course on poetry or trans studies— don’t worry! No familiarity is required with either. The first few weeks will offer a crash course on reading poetry and on trans history, and we’ll carry these conversations throughout the semester. Evaluation is based on a series of writing assignments, some critical and some more creative.

Course texts include the anthology Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, excerpts from academic scholarship on poetics, and selected poems from our main authors. Some of these authors will likely include Cameron Awkward-Rich, Oliver Baez Bendorf, J. Jennifer Espinoza, Trace Peterson, Trish Salah, and Yanyi.

ENGL 2560-003 - Postcolonial Literature

MW 12:30PM-01:45PM (Dawson's Row 1)
Jordan Burke

The middle of the twentieth century saw a coordinated push for national independence in areas occupied by major European powers. Literature subsequently produced from within those decolonizing zones is often called postcolonial, a term that sometimes refers to an era (from roughly 1947 to 1975), at other times to an ethos. This course examines the many, often conflicting, ways of reading literature as postcolonial. Rather than expecting postcolonial literatures or their authors to share a strict set of behaviors, we will explore the surprising institutional, cultural, and formal appearances of Anglophone postcolonial literature, literature that tells a story more complex than the vocabularies often applied to it. Tracing a dense network of styles and authors—from W. B. Yeats, A. K. Ramanujan, Nissim Ezekiel, Okot p’Bitek, Marjorie Macgoye, Seamus Heaney, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Kamau Brathwaite, and Wole Soyinka to Vahni Capildeo, Anne Carson, Jamaica Kincaid, and M. NourbeSe Philip—the course provides a fuller sense of the centrality of postcolonial experience to our shared and shifting global perception of what literature is.

ENGL 2599-007 - Literature and Sports

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM
Jim Seitz

This course will examine literary representations of sports, including works of autobiography, fiction, and journalism. As we read and discuss these texts, we’ll consider what they teach us not only about sports but also what they teach us about literature. What is it that make certain representations of an athlete or a sport “literary”? What do fictional portrayals of sports offer that nonfictional or journalistic portrayals don’t, and vice versa? And how do textual representations differ from those presented by media like film or television?  We’ll compare genres and media throughout the term in order to address these questions, and in addition to writing about what they read and view, students will have opportunities to try their own hand at writing about sports they play or watch.

ENGL 2599-008 - How to be Ethical?

MW 09:30AM-10:45AM (Bryan 233)
Nasrin Olla

How do novels, poetry, and philosophical texts teach us to relate ethically toward the stranger, the foreigner, or the other? How do we understand different cultures and peoples without reducing them to our already established frames of reference? How do we imagine otherness? This course approaches these big questions by exploring representations of the stranger and the foreigner in African and African diasporic literature. We will look at texts such as Édouard Glissant’s Faulkner, Mississippi, Camera Laye’s The Radiance of the King, Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks, and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. No prior knowledge of African literature is required to take this course. This course would be relevant to students interested in Africa and its diaspora as well as debates in ethical philosophy and postcolonial thought. 

ENGL 2599-009 - Eating the Middle Ages

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM (Shannon 108)
Casey Ireland

Medieval literature is preoccupied with food and drink—characters abstain from them, procure them, hide them, or celebrate with them. But representations of fasts and feasts, harvests and hunts, Communion wafers and holy wine are not merely depictions of sustenance and indulgence. They also describe the regulation of morality and religious practice, the maintenance of class hierarchies and the delineation of community boundaries. Characters are defined by what they eat as well as when, where, and how. From the fraught ethics of consuming meat to the craze for almond milk, this course examines the culinary as its own character in medieval literature. Readings may include selections from The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Cleanness, and Chrétien de Troyes’ Perceval as well as contemporaneous texts like One Thousand and One Nights and accounts of Crusades-era food hygiene in Jerusalem. 

ENGL 3001 - History of Literatures in English I

MW 12:00PM-12:50PM
Clare Kinney

The past is another country: they do things differently there.  Or do they? Be prepared for the shock of the old—and for its pleasures—as we explore examples of epic and romance, lyric poetry and drama, prose fiction and satire in a course whose range stretches from the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem Beowulf to some variously revolutionary 17th and 18th century works of the imagination. The one sure thing connecting this huge variety of “makings,” these shapings of other people's experiences and beliefs and fantasies, is that someone (somewhere, sometime) felt them important enough to put down in writing and therefore created the possibility for their persistence beyond their own historical moment.  Come and meet some heroic survivors!

Course requirements: attentive engagement with lectures; regular attendance at/lively participation in discussion sections; two 6 page papers, midterm examination; comprehensive final examination.

ENGL 3271 - Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies

MW 11:00AM-11:50AM
Katharine Maus

This course deals with the first half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, in which he was mainly writing histories and comedies. ENGL 3272, in the Spring, deals with the second half of Shakespeare's career, in which he was mainly writing tragedies and romances.  You may take either or both courses; neither is a prerequisite for the other.

2 50-minute lectures and 1 50-minute discussion section per week.

Requirements: 3 five-page papers, a final exam emphasizing material covered in lectures and section meetings, and regular short assignments made by section leaders.

This course does not automatically fulfill the Second Writing Requirement, but it may be tweaked to do so.  See me in the first few weeks of the semester if you are interested in this option.

ENGL 3310 - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments in Britain converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed.  The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time.  Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere.  They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print.  This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre in eighteenth century Britain.  Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – letters, drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways. 

Class requirements include frequent discussion posts via Collab; two thesis-driven essays; a poetry annotation assignment; and a final exam. 

ENGL 3320 - Literature of the Restoration & Early 18th Century

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Brad Pasanek

In this course we survey English literature from 1660 to 1745, by closely and carefully reading five important works. We will focus on major authors and major genres: in particular, Restoration drama, Augustan poetry, early prose fiction, and satire will feature. By the term’s end the student will be able to put pressure on formal elements in a text and produce a “reading” that connects the text to its historical context. — He or she will also be able to explain terms like satire, allegory, mock epic, novel, wit, Augustan, and Restoration. Assignments include two papers, weekly online participation in UVA Collab, poetry memorization, and a final exam.

ENGL 3380 - The English Novel I (Run Runaway)

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Cynthia Wall

In 1775, the German physicist and satirist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg declared that England had the best novels because England had the best roads. Daughters could escape from their fathers; sons could strike out on adventures; young ladies could make Entrances into the World; criminals could flee their crimes; highwaymen could make their fortunes. This course will explore the ways that eighteenth-century British novels themselves explored time and space, country and city, roads and inns, carriages and ships, in the fiction of Jane Austen, John Bunyan,  Frances Burney, Francis Coventry, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, and Tobias Smollett.

ENGL 3470 - Austen and Adaptation: Pride and Prejudice and Then Some

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Cristina Griffin

When Jane Austen published Pride and Prejudice in 1813, the novel did not even bear her name as its author. In the over two centuries since then, Pride and Prejudice has become a tour de force, spawning countless film adaptations, conferences, festivals, tea cozies, action figures, and even a Mr. Darcy statue in Hyde Park. In this class, we’ll ask how and why this novel seeped into the zeitgeist and never left, changing the face of global literature and bookish culture. To do so, we’ll start by reading Pride and Prejudice with depth and care. Then we’ll take a global genre tour to investigate how the novel has been adapted, co-opted, misread, ignored, commercialized, rewritten, and repurposed. You can expect genre stops to include steamy bodice-rippers, murder mysteries, Muslim romance, television comedies of manners, and yes, some zombies, too. Along the way, we’ll take adaptation seriously as a mode of cultural critique. How do these twentieth- and twenty-first-century genres arise from their own moment of production and how do they reflect back on the nineteenth century? When and how do genres become gendered? How would Mr. Darcy perform on The Bachelor

This class is designed for English and non-English majors. Whether you already sleep with a copy of Pride and Prejudice under your pillow or you’ve been living under a rock and this is the first you’ve ever heard of a lady named Jane Austen, you are welcome here. We’ll tackle Austen’s fiction and legacy rigorously and accessibly, making space for chemists, humanists, and everyone in between. Class assignments will reflect this diversity of approaches. All students should consider themselves forewarned: Pride and Prejudice may become your new favorite novel.

ENGL 3480 - The Way We Live Now: The Novel in the Nineteenth Century

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Stephen Arata

“Novels are in the hands of us all,” wrote Anthony Trollope in 1870, “from the Prime Minister down to the last-appointed scullery maid. We have become a novel-reading nation.” Indeed, over the course of the nineteenth century the novel became the most popular—and profitable—literary genre in Great Britain. Its success was due to many factors, none perhaps more important than the extraordinary sophistication and emotional power with which novelists set out to portray (as the title of one of Trollope’s own novels puts it) “the way we live now.” More than ever before, novelists were committed to recording the visible world in all its abundant detail while also exploring the complex interior lives of individual women and men. They accomplished these feats, moreover, by way of gripping stories full of adventure, love (lust too), betrayal, mystery, and wonder. In this course we will immerse ourselves in a half-dozen or so of the finest examples of the genre, chosen from among such writers as Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Thomas Hardy, and Trollope himself. Requirements will likely include bi-weekly email responses, two essays, a midterm, and final exam.

ENGL 3510 - Dreams and Visions in Medieval Poetry and Art

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Elizabeth Fowler

Several works by Chaucer, the revelations of Julian of Norwich, Pearl (a dream poem by the Gawain poet), and other surreal medieval experiments in language together with architecture, illumination, sculpture—we’ll think about poetry and the senses and how to compose virtual experiences.  Probably 5 quizzes, worksheets, a short paper or creative project.

ENGL 3515 - Medieval Mysticism

TR 09:30AM-10:45am
Kevin Hart

This seminar focuses on the contemplative or “mystical” tradition that flourished in Western Europe, especially from the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries. After a brief introduction, in which we touch on foundational texts by Augustine and Bernard of Clairvaux, we begin with Richard of St. Victor’s long overlooked The Mystical Ark, which teaches how to contemplate God in nature as well as in ecstasy; we examine Aquinas’s objections to Richard in the Summa theologiæ and evaluate his notion of “intellective contemplation” proposed there. In contrast to Aquinas, we turn to affective mysticism, especially the ecstasy that comes from meditating on the suffering Jesus. We shall read The Cloud of Unknowing, most likely by an unknown Carthusian, and also Julian of Norwich’s Showings of Divine Love. What is contemplation? Is it always prayer or can it also be reading and study? How does it differ from meditation and thought? Must contemplation have only God as its object? Or can it have natural objects? What is the contemplative life, and how does it differ from the active life? Is contemplation a matter of the mind or of the heart or both? These are some of the questions we shall consider.

ENGL 3520 - Love & Power in Renaissance Literature

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Rebecca Rush

In this wide-ranging survey of English Renaissance literature, we will grapple with the entanglements of love and power in poetry, prose, and drama from the reign of Henry VIII to the English Civil War. Readings include Queen Elizabeth’s love poems and speeches, lamentations of betrayed lovers by Isabella Whitney and Thomas Wyatt, the tale of Britomart from Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene, William Shakespeare’s dark comedy Much Ado About Nothing, the ecstatic love poems of John Donne and Katherine Philips, Thomas Middleton’s haunting tragedy The Changeling, and a raucous debate between male and female pamphleteers about whether Adam or Eve was more responsible for eating the apple.

No prior knowledge of Renaissance literature is required or assumed, and majors and non-majors at all levels are welcome.

ENGL 3559 - Moving On: Migration in/to U.S.

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Lisa Goff

This class examines the history of voluntary, coerced, and forced migration in the U.S., tracing the paths of migrating groups and their impact on urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. We’ll dig for cultural clues to changing attitudes about migration over time. Photographs, videos, books, movies, government records, poems, podcasts, paintings, comic strips, museums, manifestos: you name it, we’ll analyze it for this class.

ENGL 3560-001 - Global English

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Stephen Arata

The themes of this course are migration, exile, displacement, and (sometimes) return. Our primary readings will consist of twenty-first century anglophone fiction drawn from around the globe. Likely candidates include Helen Oyiyemi, Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, Teju Cole, Michael Ondaatje, NoViolet Bulawayo, Mohsin Hamid, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Amitav Ghosh, Zadie Smith, Aleksandar Hemon, and Dinaw Mengestu. We will also engage with the lively current debate on the status of world literature as a field of study by way of selected critical pieces by writers such as Amit Chaudhuri, David Damrosch, Emily Apter, and Simon Gikandi. Requirements will include two essays and a handful of shorter writing assignments.

ENGL 3560-002 - Musical Fictions

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Njelle Hamilton

Cross-listed with AAS 3500

Why do we imagine that musicians have some kind of special gift, some magic that makes them something more than human? Why do we mourn so deeply and collectively when our favorite musician passes away? Why do we form Hives and Navies to publicly, collectively, and obsessively follow and fawn over our favorite performers? Over the course of this semester, we will explore the genre of the contemporary musical novel as we interrogate why writers and readers are so intrigued by the figure of the musician as a literary trope. Pairing close listening and music theory with close reading of important blues, jazz, reggae, mambo, calypso and rock novels set in the U.S., U.K, Jamaica, Trinidad, France, and Germany, we will consider how novelists attempt to record the soul, lyrics, and structure of music, not on wax, but in novelistic prose, and what kinds of cultural baggage and aesthetic conventions particular music forms bring to the novel form. Why for example, are ‘jazz’ novels so concerned with race and the chronicle of black lives under oppression and violence all across the globe? Why are so many ‘rock’ novels written by male writers, and why do they so often deal with issues of (white) masculinity under threat? The topical nature of many of these issues, songs, and novels will hopefully inspire you to thought-provoking class discussions, critical response papers, and final papers that push against the “fictions” and assumptions of musicians and novelists alike.

ENGL 3560-003 - Modern English Poetry

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Kevin Hart

This seminar introduces students to a range of poetry written in England in the second half of the twentieth century. We will attend to regional differences with regard to subject matter and language, as well as to the different projections of what “England,” “English,” and “Englishness” mean over a period in which England deals with loss of Empire, an increasingly insecure sense of “Britain,” class struggle, immigration, and its ambiguous relationship with Europe. Our main focus will be poems by Basil Bunting, Thom Gunn, Philip Larkin, Geoffrey Hill, Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin, and Sylvia Plath. We will also take notice of what some of these writers say about each other.

ENGL 3560-004 - James Joyce's Ulysses

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Victor Luftig

If you are reading this, you’ve probably heard that Ulysses is great, influential, and way hard; you are less likely to have heard how funny it is, and how rewarding reading it can be. Difficult?  Sure, but how difficult is up to each reader or group of readers: in this course, designed for first-time readers of the book, we’ll consider what the book obscures and why, and we’ll consider too some strategies for responding to its obscurity.  But our focus will be on what Ulysses makes available to us as 21st century readers.  In what ways can its styles, its engagement with the ‘real,’ its accounts of human experience, and its consideration of categories of people—by gender, nation, race, ethnicity, religion, age, body type, temperament, etc—provide us with particular insights, pleasures, and cautions?  Prior to the first class session, please read as much as you can of an annotated edition of Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. (The Viking edition with notes by Anderson, which you can easily find used, would be fine.) There will be a couple of papers, a couple of tests, and a final exam; the final paper will ask you to think about what sort of public acknowledgements would be appropriate on the occasion of the book’s 100th anniversary next February. At the end of the course we’ll have a taste of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake to prepare you for future explorations of that book—which too is challenging, rewarding, and “lovesoftfun.”

ENGL 3570-001 - American Wild

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Stephen Cushman

With biblical images of wilderness in mind, seventeenth-century English colonizers of Massachusetts described what they found as another wilderness, howling, savage, terrible.  For them it was to be feared, avoided, and, where possible, tamed.  Four centuries later, with eighty percent of U.S. citizens living in cities, many of them exposed to wilderness only through calendar pictures or screensaver photos, what meaning or value does American wildness have?  Is it only a fantasy image, part of an American brand, as in the phrase “the wild West.”  Are wildness and wilderness the same thing?  Has the howling, terrible, untamed wildness of the seventeenth-century forest relocated to another sphere, in the wildness of wildfires in California and throughout the west?  Is climate the new frontier, the new wilderness, where Americans encounter untamed wildness in droughts, floods, violent storms, and extreme weather?  Have we come full circle to more biblical imagery, with apocalypse replacing wilderness as the rubric under which we encounter the wild?

This course will begin with a look at biblical antecedents and their influence on white colonists encountering landscapes inhabited by native people.  From there we’ll move to the literature of westward exploration, and further encounters with indigenous populations and their lands, in selections from the journals of Jefferson-commissioned Lewis and Clark.  Then it’s on to the mid-nineteenth pivot toward wildness in the eyes of Romantic beholders, foremost among them Henry David Thoreau, patron saint of preservation and the environmental movement.  Next comes John Muir, whose vision of wilderness begat the U.S. National Park System, admired around the globe and synonymous for many with user-friendly wildness.  Proceeding to the twentieth-century, we’ll add important voices, such as Aldo Leopold’s and Rachel Carson’s and Rebecca Solnit’s, as the preservation impulse merges with concern about public health and social justice.  We’ll complete our tour in the twenty-first century by joining the intensifying conversation about whether the visions of Thoreau, Muir, et al. are exclusively white and male.  

Open to all.  Those in the Environmental Thought and Practice Program welcome.

ENGL 3570-002 - Race and Ethnicity in Latinx Literature

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Carmen Lamas

In this course we will examine the construction of race and ethnicity in Latinx literature by examining key texts by individuals from varying Latinx groups who live in the United States. We will explore race and ethnicity from a hemispheric perspective in order to inquire as to its specific manifestation in Latinx literature and culture.  All readings, discussions, and assignments are in English.

ENGL 3572 - Black Protest Narrative

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Marlon Ross

This course studies modern racial protest expressed through African American narrative art (fiction, autobiography, film) from the 1930s to 1980s, focusing on Civil Rights, Black Power, Black Panthers, womanism, and black gay/lesbian liberation movements. We explore the media, forms, and theories of modern protest movements, how they shaped and have been shaped by literature and film. What does it mean to lodge a protest in artistic form? Some themes include lynching, segregation, sharecropping, black communism, migration, urbanization, religion, crime and policing, normative and queer sexualities, war and military service, cross-racial coalitions, and the role of the individual in social change. Either directly or indirectly, all of these narratives ask pressing questions about the meaning of American citizenship and racial community under the conditions of racial segregation and the fight for integration or black nationalist autonomy.  What does it mean to be “Negro” and American? How should African Americans conduct themselves on the world stage, and which international identifications are most productive? What roles do the press and popular media play in the sustenance and/or erosion of a sense of community both within a racial group and in relation to the country? What are the obligations of oppressed communities to the nation that oppresses them? What role should violence play in working toward liberation? We begin our study with the most famous protest novel, Richard Wright’s Native Son.  Then we examine other narratives in this tradition, including works by Angelo Herndon, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, Essex Hemphill, and Joseph Beam. Films include Joseph Mankiewitz’s No Way Out, Melvin Van Peebles’ Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song and The Watermelon Man, Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, and Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied. In addition to fiction, film, and autobiography, we’ll read selections from pertinent texts in history, literary criticism, journalism, cultural criticism, film theory, and sociology. Assignments include two short essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENGL 3660 - Modern Poetry

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Mark Edmundson

In this course we’ll seek to understand and appreciate a group of brilliant modern poets. We begin with William Butler Yeats, a poet who achieved consistent artistic greatness. (But whose ethics and politics provoke some questions.) Then on to Robert Frost, who offers immediate, and very real satisfactions, but who also, on extended study, reveals a deeper, darker side.  We’ll read Wallace Stevens next, a stunningly original poet, who looked for paradise in his own imagination. Then we’ll consider T.S. Eliot—author of the culture-shaking poem, “The Waste Land.” With that basis we’ll move out to the singular observer and moralist, Marianne Moore; the independent and high spirited poet of African American life, Langston Hughes; and Elizabeth Bishop, artful poet of loneliness and solitude.  Perhaps we’ll end with a contemporary poet or two. Ross Gay? Frederick Seidel? There will be a couple of quizzes, and a paper at the end in which students offer informed appreciation of  their favorite writer in the course.

ENGL 3710 - Literature of the South

MW 01:00PM-01:50PM
Jennifer Greeson

Discussion sections to be determined.

Across the 20th century and into the 21st, Americans negotiating the transformations of modernity and postmodernity have turned to literary representations of the South to get their bearings.  In imagining the South we seek a rooted, enduring culture in a sea of commercialism and mobility; we confront the persistence of racial and economic inequality at odds with the ideals of the United States; we insist upon the importance of locality in our increasingly global consciousnesses.  We also consume “the South” as a commodity, invoke it as an excuse or alibi for the nation’s ills, and enjoy its ostensible perversity as a guilty pleasure.  In this course we will read some of the most challenging, startling, and beautiful American prose fiction of the past 100 years, while attending as well to the broader cultural field of film, image, and music of which it is a part.  We will think in particular about questions of nationalism and literature (the role of “folk” culture; the location of poverty; place and race); questions of representation and representativeness (“identity” of writers; authenticity; production and presentation of Southern stuff); and questions of performance (of class, gender, race, and region).  Major authors will include Chesnutt, Faulkner, Caldwell, Porter, Wright, Welty, Hurston, Percy, and O'Connor.

ENGL 3910 - Satire

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
John O'Brien

What is satire? Most of us think that we can more or less identify a satire when we see it, but beyond that, defining satire and talking it about meaningfully have often proven elusive. In this course, we will work to figure out not only what satire is, but what it does, socially and politically. We will read satires from the ancient world to the present, from authors like the Roman poet Juvenal, the Irish cleric Jonathan Swift, the Norwegian novelist Gerd Brandenberg, and the American writer Paul Beatty. We will also consider film and video satires, as well as what crops up in the media in the course of the semester—because we know that something will. Midterm and final exams; two writing exercises and occasional contributions on a group e-mail thread or wiki. 

ENGL 3924 - The Vietnam War in Literature & Film

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Sylvia Chong

It has been over 40  years since the Fall of Saigon in 1975, marking the end of a war that claimed the lives of an estimated 58,260 American troops and over 4 million Southeast Asians across Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. In the U.S. today, “Vietnam” signifies not a country but a lasting syndrome that haunts American politics and society, from debates about foreign policy to popular culture. But what of the millions of Southeast Asian refugees the War created? What, in this moment of commemoration and reflection, are the lasting legacies of the Vietnam War / American War for Southeast Asian diasporic communities? We will examine literature and film (fictional and documentary) made by and about Americans and Southeast Asians (Vietnamese, Cambodians, Laotians, and Hmong) affected by the Vietnam War, spanning the entirety of this 40 year period. Texts may include Francis Ford Coppola, Apocalypse Now; Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried; Peter Davis, Hearts and Minds; Yusek Komunyakaa, Dien Cia Dau; Tiana Alexander, From Hollywood to Hanoi; Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Sympathizer; Duong Thu Huong, Paradise of the Blind; Clint Eastwood, Gran Torino; Socheata Poeuv, New Years Baby.

ENGL 3971 - History of Drama I

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
John Parker

The first third of this course will cover the drama of classical antiquity in translation, beginning with Greek plays by Sophocles and Euripides, then moving from there to the Latin plays of Plautus and Seneca.  The next third of the course will consider the kinds of performance that displaced (and in some cases transformed) this pagan tradition after the Christianization of the Roman empire.  We'll likely read a gospel in order to better understand Christianity's relationship to Greco-Roman culture before looking at several dramatizations of scripture, a morality play and perhaps a saint play.  The final third of the course will cover plays from the Renaissance, focusing particularly on the commercial London stage.  Playwrights will include people like Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Kyd, William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton.

One goal of the course will be to answer some of the questions posed by historical period: what does it mean, in the context of this particular genre, to move from antiquity to the Middle Ages to the Renaissance?  How seriously should we take the differences between paganism and Christianity?  What portion of early modern drama derives from classical antiquity, what portion from the Middle Ages, and what portion, if any, is new?  What does it mean to say that drama by the time of Shakespeare had been secularized?

ENGL 4500-002 - Gothic Forms

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Cynthia Wall

Gothic literature burst onto the scene in the eighteenth century with ruined castles, ethereal music, brooding villains and surprisingly sturdy heroines, all performing as metaphors of our deepest fears and fiercest resistances. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the gothic continued as a genre of cultural anxiety. This seminar will survey gothic literature through both history and genre: the classic novels, Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1797), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959), and Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818); the vampire poetry of 18thC German poet and poems by John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Sylvia Plath; the plays of Matthew Lewis and Richard Brinsley Peake; and the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. W. Jacobs, Richard Matheson, and Stephen King. And we will ask ourselves: What are we afraid of?

ENGL 4520-001 - Renaissance Drama

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
John Parker

To examine some of Shakespeare's greatest contemporaries and rivals, in particular Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, with special attention to the London theater's sub-genres: revenge tragedy, city comedy and tragi-comedy.  Other authors may include Thomas Kyd, Francis Beaumont, Elizabeth Cary, John Fletcher, George Chapman, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, John Ford and Philip Massinger.  We will try to get a sense of what it means to speak of a "Renaissance" at this moment in English history and to understand how the London commercial stage relates to earlier forms of theater.

ENGL 4520-002 - Afterlives of the Epic

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Dan Kinney

What becomes of the epic, especially (but not only) in Renaissance England? Where has it been, and where does it still have to go? Why does the most elevated of literary modes in traditional reckonings end up seeming passe or impossible to so many moderns? Works to be read include Homer's epics, The Aeneid, The Inferno, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, The Dunciad, and The Waste Land. Class requirements: lively participation including brief email responses, two shorter or one more substantial term paper, and a final exam.

ENGL 4540-002 - Romantic Poetry

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM
Mark Edmundson

In this seminar we’ll read closely in the work of the major English Romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Coleridge, and Byron.  We’ll end with a novel by Jane Austen, probably “Pride and Prejudice,” which will give us a useful vantage from which to evaluate the Romantic project. A short paper and a longer one, plentiful class discussion. 

ENGL 4559 - THE BIBLE Part 1: Hebrew Bible / Old Testament

MW 11:00AM-12:15PM
Stephen Cushman

The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century.  Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament, from Genesis through the prophets, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts.  Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary.  Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed.  All are welcome.  No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.

PLEASE NOTE: Professor John Parker will teach a course focusing on the New Testament in spring 2022.  Both courses will read the New Testament gospel of Mark, connecting the semesters, but you do not have to take the fall course as a prerequisite for the spring one.

ENGL 4560-001 - Contemporary Poetry

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Jahan Ramazani

In this seminar, we will examine an array of postwar idioms, forms, and movements. While devoting much of our attention to some of the most influential poetry from the second half of the twentieth century, we will also bring ourselves up to date by examining some of the best poems published in recent years by poets of diverse backgrounds. To hone our attention, we will focus on several specific kinds of poetry, including sonnets, elegies, and poems about the visual arts. The seminar will emphasize the development of skills of close reading, critical thinking, and imaginative, knowledgeable writing about poetry.

ENGL 4560-002 - Multiethnic American Fiction: Toni Morrison & Louise Erdrich

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Caroline Rody

In this course we will study two great contemporary writers as novelists as well as thinkers, public intellectuals, shapers of our culture: Toni Morrison (1931 – 2019), author of eleven novels (among other texts) and a Nobel Laureate, and Louise Erdrich (1954 - ) author of eighteen novels (among other texts) and winner of a National Book Award.  Morrison and Erdrich write as daughters to rich legacies of, respectively, African American and Native American storytelling, struggle, and survival; as heirs to European and American literary traditions; as advocates for their peoples; and as contributors to a broadly humane vision of a shared, contemporary life.  In a challenging era, we’ll seek sustenance from their artistic invention, their social critique, and their cultivation of imaginative power and beauty.

We will read three to four novels by each writer, along with lots of background and critical material, including these writers’ essays and interviews. Some of the novels have not yet been selected, but the following are definite choices:  Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Sula, and Beloved, and Erdrich’s Tracks and The Sentence (forthcoming in early November).  Requirements: Very active reading and participation, joint leading of one class, frequent short essays, and a longer final essay.

ENGL 4560-003 - Harlem Stories

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Sandhya Shukla

Harlem has been many things to many people – capital of a global African diaspora, an early instance of Italian and Jewish immigrant communities, home to an important el barrio, a representative site of contemporary gentrification and, above all, a place for racial and ethnic minoritization.  This course will explore many of those lived and symbolic Harlems from the early twentieth century to the present.  It will closely consider representations that both open up a paradigmatic case of race and class in the United States and dwell in the possibilities of cross-cultural exchange across regional divides.  We will employ the language and structure of globality to understand the heterogeneity of blackness – African/American, Caribbean, Puerto Rican and more – and variegations of whiteness, in a range of novels, films, memoirs and essays that interrogate identity and community.  The mix of approaches across fields will build an interdisciplinary inquiry into the production of social space and suggest that forms – narrative structures and modes, styles of description – are crucial for understanding the power of this place.  

Key texts may include fictional and non-fictional works such as Chester Himes’s A Rage in Harlem, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand and Passing, Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, Ernesto Quinones’s Bodega Dreams, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitt’s Harlem is Nowhere, Langston Hughes’s Montage of a Dream Deferred, Monique Taylor’s Harlem Between Heaven and Hell, and Piri Thomas’s Down These Mean Streets, as well as cultural historical and theoretical materials by George Hutchinson, Robert Orsi, Wilson Harris, Edouard Glissant and Marshall Berman.  Students will be required to present on one week’s materials for class, submit regular reading responses and complete one critical essay and a longer research paper on a chosen topic.

ENGL 4560-004 - Music of the Black Atlantic

*(cross-listed with AAS 4570)
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM (Dell 1-104)
Prof. Njelle Hamilton

Listen: some of us haven’t left our houses/town/state in a year and we can’t safely go on cruises right now. So come vibe to a carnival of music this semester as we travel the major ports of call from which key Black music forms emerged: New Orleans (jazz and blues); Kingston (reggae and dub); Rio de Janeiro (samba and bossa nova); Lagos (highlife and afrobeat); London/Brixton (lovers rock and grime). Our in-class activities will be a combination of dedicated listening sessions (DJ-NJ at the Spotify turntable); reading about music; and analyzing musical novels, plays, TV shows and films and their soundtracks. We’ll close read and close listen to George Wolfe’s jazz-origins play Jelly’s Last Jam, Marcia Douglas’s reggae novel The Marvellous Equations of the Dread, Netflix’s bossa nova romper Girls from Ipanema, Broadway’s booty-shaking Fela!, Steve McQueen’s slow burning Lovers Rock, and ride Kodwo Eshun’s mind-bending sonic spaceship to the Afrofuture. We’ll have spirited conversations on deck 5 about the literary and social function of the black musician, why black women have often been relegated to the background or footnotes of musical history, the connections between race, place and music, and how music circulates with and against the tides and currents of the Atlantic and its history. You will both read examples of music criticism and craft your own, with options to write about full length albums, TV/film soundscapes, or sonic literature. By the time our imaginary cruise ship returns to port at the end of the semester, you will be well equipped to craft a research paper that applies black sound studies approaches and methods to whatever ports, sounds or texts fired your imagination and curiosity. See you aboard!

ENGL 4560-005 - Thinking from Africa

MW 12:30PM-01:45PM
Nasrin Olla

In contemporary public discourse, we find an attitude of suspicion and distrust toward postcolonial thought. In the French context, postcolonial thought has been represented as fostering forms of separatism. And in the USA, the study of race has been seen as encouraging forms of national division. In this course, we will explore the legacy of African traditions of critique and we will consider why such misrepresentations of these traditions proliferate. We will read writers such as: M. NourbeSe Philip, Dionne Brand, Achille Mbembe, Édouard Glissant, and Patrick Chamoiseau. And, we will ask: What novel modes of commonality do these writers conjure? What new conception of the universal do these writers reach for? What kind of world do these anti-racist traditions birth? This course would be relevant to students interested in postcolonial legacies, Anglophone and Francophone African literature, African philosophy, and contemporary debates around race.

ENGL 4561 - Coetzee and Rushdie

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM
Christopher Krentz

In this course we’ll explore the work of two of the most well-known postcolonial novelists working in English: J.M. Coetzee (originally from S. Africa) and Salman Rushdie (originally from India).  In some ways they are a study in contrasts: while Coetzee has produced spare fiction whose sentences the Nobel Prize committee in 2003 praised for being “pregnant with meaning,” Rushdie’s books are exuberant, playful, and funny, whizzing among many rhetorical modes.  Yet in many ways they pair up well: both first achieved prominence in the 1980s; both masterfully use language to critique their historical moments and the authoritarian regimes around them; both protest censorship, with Rushdie famously having to go into hiding to avoid a death sentence in 1988; and both have chosen to live away from the nations of their birth.  We’ll probably read Coetzee’s novels Waiting to the Barbarians, Life & Times of Michael K, Disgrace, and Summertime, and Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, East, West, The Moor’s Last Sigh, as well as excerpts from his other work.  You should expect some great reading, enlivening discussions, new insight into others part of the world, and some literary-critical writing assignments (what exactly will depend on whether we’re in person or on Zoom) that give you the chance to do some research.

ENGL 4570-001 - Caribbean Latinx Literature

R 03:30PM-06:00PM
Carmen Lamas

We will explore novels, plays, short stories and poems by Latinx writers from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba. While these writers’ genealogies emerge from these island countries, we will analyze how their lives in NYC, Jersey, Boston and Miami impact how they narrate the Latinx experience as situated between the US and their home countries in the Caribbean. All readings, discussions and assignments are in English.

ENGL 4570-002 - Reading the Black College Campus

R 05:00PM-07:30PM
K. Ian Grandison

How does the monumentality of the signature buildings on the campuses of land-grant colleges and universities in America resist the slight “Cow School” to belittle the official mission of these institutions?  Does the ubiquitous ivy that cloaks their campuses reinforce our perception of the exclusivity of Ivy League colleges and universities? How does the discourse that posits the UVA Lawn as a seminal architectural legacy of a United States founding father help to distinguish the Lawn’s residents from passers-by, who must admire it from a respectful distance?  “Reading the Black College Campus” is a student-centered, sensing/interpreting/communicating course that is generally concerned with the ways in which built environments are entangled with the negotiation of power in society. In particular, we explore this goal by focusing on how the campuses of HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) were shaped by (and shaped) the struggle to democratize education in the United States especially during the Jim Crow Period.  Rather than the still dominant approach in architectural and landscape architectural criticism to emphasize art-historical interpretations, we foreground interpretations that engage built environments, such as college campuses, as arenas of cultural conflict and negotiation. As such, we are less interested in engaging the campus of Tuskegee University in Alabama as representing the genius of David Williston (Tuskegee’s black landscape architect at the turn of the last century) than in such questions as why the institution’s industrial facilities were placed at the main entrances to its campus during that period.  With this interrogation as a model, students are encouraged to engage our own campus more critically. Beyond its significance as an outdoor museum of neo-classical buildings, for example, we consider the Lawn as a multi-layered record of the sometimes delicate and sometimes robust negotiation among the individuals and groups connected with it for position and privilege in the social hierarchy. In short we begin to engage built environments as important sources for cultural critique. Through discussion of readings and field trips (including one to the campus of a Virginia HBCU), lectures and workshops, and student-group presentations, we explore ideas, concepts and methods to read built environments by synthesizing knowledge gained from sensing them, studying them through maps and diagrams and primary and secondary written and oral accounts.  Readings include Anderson’s Black Education in the South.

ENGL 4580 - Reason, Criticism, Culture

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Walter Jost

This course invites students to “think about thinking” across several disciplines—law, literature, psychology, sociology, and religion.  Focused particularly on persuasive reasoning (what was once called the liberal art of “rhetoric”), we consider activities of creativity, argument, interpretation and judgment in particular law cases, poems, novels, and non-fiction.  This course works well for those who are interested in reading widely, thinking carefully, and writing well across disciplines.  Several papers; four or five texts (these change from year to year).

ENGL 4998 - Distinguished Majors Program

T 05:00PM-07:30PM
Mary Kuhn

ENGL 5100 - Introduction to Old English

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Peter Baker

In this course, open to both undergraduates and graduates, you will learn to read the language of Beowulf—that is, the English language as preserved in sources from around 700 to 1100. After a brief introduction to the language (which is alarming at first glance but much easier to learn than any foreign language), readings will include prose excerpts from historical and religious sources and several verse classics, including The Battle of Maldon, The Wanderer, The Dream of the Rood, and The Wife’s Lament. Work for the course includes bi-weekly quizzes, a brief final exam, and a term paper. This course is a prerequisite for Beowulf, offered in the spring term.

ENGL 5559-002 - Reinventing Shakespeare

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Clare Kinney

Shakespeare’s works have been regularly appropriated by both literary critics and creative artists to serve very different cultural agendas at various historical moments. In this course we will take a close look at four plays and their afterlife, in each case exploring the resonance of their reshaping and revision in a variety of media (while also paying some attention to the critical reception of the works and to contemporary scholarship on Shakespearian adaptation). Why is Shakespeare such a malleable cultural icon? What do these creative re-productions suggest about the cultural forces underlying the apparently unceasing need to remake and/or “correct” and/or supplement “Shakespeare’s genius”?

Tentative list of plays whose metamorphoses we will explore: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Hamlet; King Lear; The Tempest

Course requirements: lively participation in discussion, an oral presentation, one short research exercise, one long term paper, a portfolio of e-mail responses.

ENGL 5559-003 - Rhetoric and Affect

R 03:30PM-06:00PM
T. Kenny Fountain

What part does language and representation play in our construction and experience of emotion?

This course will engage that question by exploring the intersection of rhetorical studies, literary studies, and affect studies. Specifically, we will examine how emotion, sensation, and affect have been conceptualized, condemned, and celebrated—from Plato to contemporary neuroscience. Rather than answer this animating question once and for all, we will read primary and secondary works across a vast historical period to better understand the often-connected ways thinkers have wrestled with the question and its philosophical and practical implications.

We will begin with ancient Greek and Roman debates about the dangerous power of rhetoric and poetry to stir emotions by engaging one’s imagination and memory. Next, we will turn to a host of medieval and early modern works (from philosophical and literary treatises to ars rhetorica and ars poetriae) that build from this ancient tradition as a means of taking seriously emotion and passion as sources for both art and ethics. Finally, we will end in the 20th and 21st centuries, where scholars of rhetoric, literature, and digital media argue with and against the work of philosophers and scientists—each seeking to explain the role emotion and affect play in the formation of self, the work of politics, and the experience of contemporary life.

Course requirements will include class participation, short reading-based responses, a longer paper, and an op-ed designed for a public audience.

Important Note on the Course: For decades, scholars from within rhetorical studies have critiqued the field for its narrow focus on white, European rhetorical traditions, a focus that frequently excludes or marginalizes the perspectives of non-white, non-male, non-US, and non-western scholars and theorists (Godfried Agyeman Asante, “#RhetoricSoWhite and US Centered,” 2019). This course takes seriously that critique and responds by expanding what we think of as “the” rhetorical tradition and including work on rhetoric, affect, and emotions by scholars from backgrounds and perspectives often overlooked by dominant approaches to rhetoric.

ENGL 5559-004 - Women Poets, Race, Land, and Memory

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Alison Booth

This seminar will focus on celebrated female poets Anne Spencer (1882-1975), part of the Harlem Renaissance while living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake (1861-1913), a Canadian international star representing Mohawk heritage. These poets presented their relationships to Nature and place in different ways, and explored poetic voices that responded to British and American poets, including Longfellow and the Brownings. We will also read other female poets of color of the 19th-21st centuries, centered on ideas of race, gender, place, and environment. Our work will include exploring unpublished archives (Special Collections), reading biographies and criticism, getting comfortable with reading and interpreting poetry, writing two essays, brief experimentation with digital tools, a brief take-home exam. The course welcomes all; no previous dissatisfaction with your experiences of poetry, research, or technology should make you hesitate! Note: we have an opportunity to collaborate with a course offered TR 11:30-12:15 in Architecture/Architectural History, and studies of design/landscape related to a UVA Three Cavaliers grant (options for paid internships in 2022).

 

ENGL 5700 - Contemporary African-American Literature

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Lisa Woolfork

ENGL 5810 - Books as Physical Objects

MW 11:00AM-12:15PM BRN 233
David Vander Meulen

We know the past chiefly through artifacts that survive, and books are among the most common of these objects. Besides conveying a text, each book also contains evidence of the circumstances of its manufacture.  In considering what questions to ask of these mute objects, this course might be considered the "archaeology of printing"—that is, the identification, description, and interpretation of printed artifacts surviving from the past five centuries, as well as exploration of the critical theory that lies behind such an approach to texts. With attention to production processes, including the operation of the hand press, it will investigate ways of analyzing elements such as paper, typography, illustrations, binding, and organization of the constituent sections of a book.  The course will explore how a text is inevitably affected by the material conditions of its production and how an understanding of the physical processes by which it was formed can aid historical research in a variety of disciplines, not only those that treat verbal texts but also those that deal with printed music and works of visual art.  The class will draw on the holdings of the University Library's Special Collections Department, as well as on its Hinman Collator (an early version of the one at the CIA).  Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

ENGL 5900 - Counterpoint Seminar

M 06:30PM-09:00PM
Hallie Richmond

The “Counterpoint Seminar” is a hands-on, practical seminar designed to help you think like a teacher. In this course we juxtapose two sometimes dissonant fields of study: literary studies and pedagogy. During the semester you will consider how to combine your skills developed in previous literature classes with your emerging knowledge about pedagogy. I recognize that seminar members come to this course with different levels of familiarity with literary theory, culturally responsive pedagogy, and antiracist literature instruction. Our seminar will enable each member to increase fluency with these critical teaching skills. We will read literary texts that are frequently taught in the high school English classroom and practice applying pedagogical strategies that reflect best practices in English education. We will also read selections from pedagogical and theoretical texts to improve your ability to help students of different reading levels access rich, difficult texts and achieve depth and complexity in their textual interpretations. There will be time in this course to deepen your knowledge and reflect on your assumptions about education and yourself as an educator.

Writing and Rhetoric

ENWR 1505 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1505-001 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Claire Chantell

ENWR 1505-002 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Claire Chantell

ENWR 1505-003 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM BRN 203
Patricia Sullivan

ENWR 1505-004 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM BRN 203
Patricia Sullivan

ENWR 1505-005 - Writing about Identities

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 1505-006 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Marcus Meade

ENWR 1505-007 - Writing about Identities

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry (77 sections)

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1510-001 - Writing about Digital Media

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

ENWR 1510-002 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-003 - Multilingual Writers

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

ENWR 1510-004 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

ENWR 1510-005 - Writing about Identities

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-006 - Writing about the Arts

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM

ENWR 1510-007 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM

ENWR 1510-008 - Writing about Science & Tech

MWF 08:00AM-08:50AM

ENWR 1510-009 - Writing about Identities

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Devin Donovan

ENWR 1510-010 - Writing about Science & Tech

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Cory Shaman

ENWR 1510-011 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM

ENWR 1510-012 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM
Jon D'Errico

ENWR 1510-013 - Writing about the Arts

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

ENWR 1510-014 - Writing about Digital Media

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-015 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-016 - Multilingual Writers

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

ENWR 1510-017 - Writing about Identities

MW 02:00PM-03:15PM
Devin Donovan

ENWR 1510-018 - Writing about Science & Tech

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

ENWR 1510-019 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-020 - Writing about the Arts

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-021 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM

ENWR 1510-022 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-023 - Writing about Culture/Society

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-024 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-025 - Writing about the Arts

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-026 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-027 - Writing about Culture/Society

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-028 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-029 - Writing about the Arts

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM
Charity Fowler

ENWR 1510-030 - Writing about Culture/Society

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-031 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

ENWR 1510-032 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Lindgren Johnson

ENWR 1510-033 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-034 - Writing about the Arts

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-035 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM
Jon D'Errico

ENWR 1510-036 - Writing about the Arts

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM

ENWR 1510-037 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

ENWR 1510-038 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-039 - Writing about Identities

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-041 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-042 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-043 - Writing about Identities

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-044 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-045 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM

ENWR 1510-046 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

ENWR 1510-047 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 02:00PM-02:50PM

ENWR 1510-048 - Writing about Identities

MWF 03:00PM-03:50PM

ENWR 1510-049 - Writing about the Arts

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-050 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-051 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 05:00PM-06:15PM
Keith Driver

ENWR 1510-052 - Writing about the Arts

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM

ENWR 1510-053 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

ENWR 1510-054 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Lindgren Johnson

ENWR 1510-055 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-056 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-057 - Writing about Identities

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM

ENWR 1510-058 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 09:30AM-10:45AM

ENWR 1510-059 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-060 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 03:00PM-03:50PM

ENWR 1510-061 - Writing about Science & Tech

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Cory Shaman

ENWR 1510-062 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
David Coyoca

ENWR 1510-063 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Anastatia Curley

ENWR 1510-064 - Writing about the Arts

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-065 - Writing about Identities

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM

ENWR 1510-066 - Writing about the Arts

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM

ENWR 1510-067 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 06:00PM-07:15PM

ENWR 1510-068 - Writing about the Arts

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Steph Ceraso

ENWR 1510-069 - Writing about Culture/Society

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM

ENWR 1510-070 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 06:30PM-07:45PM
Keith Driver

ENWR 1510-071 - Writing about Culture/Society

MW 06:30PM-07:45PM

ENWR 1510-072 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM

ENWR 1510-073 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 08:00AM-09:15AM

ENWR 1510-074 - Writing about Digital Media

MW 03:30PM-04:45PM

ENWR 1510-075 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM

ENWR 1510-076 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM

ENWR 1510-077 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM

ENWR 1510-078 - Writing about Culture/Society

TR 06:30PM-07:45PM

ENWR 1520 - Writing & Community Engagement

Section 1
TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Kate Stephenson

Section 2
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Kate Stephenson

ENWR 2510-001 - Writing about Identities

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Jim Seitz

ENWR 2510-002 - Writing about Identities: Writing Regret and Repair

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Tamika Carey

If the old saying is true and everyone actually makes mistakes, then why are apologies so hard to write and why are some apologies more easily dismissed than others? This section of ENWR 2510 explores these questions about regret and repair from an identity-based perspective to strengthen your methods for writing. Said differently, we will consider how class, race, gender, and other identity markers influence public perceptions of error and impression management. We will also investigate social expectations of how regret should be expressed. By doing so, we will pursue the goal of this course, which is to cultivate and refine your analytical reading techniques, invention processes, composing practices, and strategies for revision and publication.

ENWR 2510-003 - Writing about the Arts

MW 05:00PM-06:15PM
Charity Fowler

ENWR 2510-004 - Writing & Community Engagement

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Kevin Smith

ENWR 2510-005 - Writing & Community Engagement

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Kevin Smith

ENWR 2510-006 - Writing & Community Engagement

M 06:00PM-08:30PM
Stephen Parks

ENWR 2520-001 - Rewriting Yourself: Studies in Literacy and Cognition

MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM
Heidi Nobles

What do we know and what are we still learning about how writing influences our minds and selves? Literacy has dramatically reshaped the human brain over millennia. Yet as literacy itself evolves, we still lack satisfactory data on how writing (and its counterpart, reading) affects our neurology and cognition—and therefore, how literacy affects who we are as humans.

In this reading- and writing-intensive course, we will read a range of work on literacy and cognition, including technical and popular treatments of issues such as reading and neural development, brain function during writing tasks, brain activity connected to other creative tasks, and more. We’ll read work from creativity experts, neurologists and cognitive scientists, psychologists, mental health practitioners, computer scientists, and professional writers and editors, all in trying to understand the relationship between literacy and our minds. Reading assignments will include a series of “read-in” activities; writing assignments will include a combination of creative, reflective, and research-based projects. 

By the term’s end, you should have an enriched sense of yourself as a reader and writer, and how your literacy practices play into your larger identity.

ENWR 2520-003 - Vegan Writing

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Lindgren Johnson

ENWR 2520-004 - SCI & Medical Communications

MWF 01:00PM-01:50PM
Kiera Allison

ENWR 2520-005 - History and Culture of Writing at UVA

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM
Heidi Nobles

The University of Virginia, founded in 1819, began with a rich history of writing and writers; that tradition continues today. But with so many different writing activities taking place across Grounds and across time, we may not fully appreciate what all this culture means.

In this course, you will both research and contribute to the culture of writing at UVA. You’ll have a chance to read the (mostly unpublished) writing of past students and faculty, to see where we’ve come from. You’ll also investigate current writing activities across Grounds, helping put together a puzzle that reveals what and how we’re writing today. And finally, you’ll create your own original writing to add to our university archives, making your mark for future generations to read.

Through this hands-on literary adventure, you will gain a holistic sense of UVA's rich writing culture and your place, as well.

For more, see this UVA Today piece on our Spring 2021 launch: “Telling UVA’S Never-Ending Story.”

ENWR 2520-006 - Audible Writing

MWF 01:00AM-01:50AM
Jon D'Errico

ENWR 2610-001 - Writing with Style

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Keith Driver

Investigates the role of style in the writing process. What does it mean to write with attention to style? How can attention to style be generative? Students will explore the variety, uses, and implications of a broad range stylistic moves available in prose writing and build a rich vocabulary for describing them. Students will imitate and analyze exemplary writing and discuss each other’s writing in a workshop setting. (Meets second writing requirement.)

ENWR 2700 - News Writing (2 Sections)

No fake news here, but rather progressive exercises in developing the news-writing style of writing from straight hard news to "soft" features. Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

001
TR 09:30AM-10:45AM
Brian Kelly

002
TR 08:00AM-09:15AM
Brian Kelly

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking (2 Sections)

001
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM
Kiera Allison

002
MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM
Kiera Allison

ENWR 3620 - Tutoring Across Cultures

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 3640 - Writing with Sound

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Steph Ceraso

This course trains students to become attuned, thoughtful listeners and sonic composers. In addition to discussing key works on sound from fields such as rhetoric and composition, sound studies, and journalism, we will experiment with the possibilities of sound as a valuable form of writing and storytelling. Students will learn how to use digital audio editing tools, platforms, and techniques for designing and producing sonic projects.

ENWR 3665 - Writing about the Environment

TR 02:00PM-03:15PM
Cory Shaman

This course focuses on creating meaningful, responsible, and engaged writing in the context of significant environmental issues. Analysis of representative environmental texts, familiarity with environmental concepts, examination of ethical positions in private and public spheres of writing, and sustained practice with form, style, medium, and genre will drive a variety of writing projects.

ENWR 3670 - Writing About Home Movies

TR 12:30PM-01:45PM
Sarah O'Brien

Of the many changes wrought by the pandemic, perhaps none will prove as enduring as the upending of our sense of being “at home.” We will consider the shifting dimensions of domestic space in the time of COVID-19 and the preceding century by watching, writing about, and making different kinds of “home movies”: amateur movies, documentaries, and fiction films, that envision home and community life in striking ways. Exploring these modes and genres will give us occasion to think and write about the values of documenting family and everyday life; the pleasures, comforts, and constraints of home-viewing practices; and film’s power to (re-) shape social structures and practices. 

ENWR 3730 - African American Rhetorics

TR 11:00AM-12:15PM
Tamika Carey

This course explores the question of how African Americans use writing, speaking, and other cultural performances and productions toward freedom. We will take up this question by learning rhetorical concepts circulating within African American writing and speaking traditions and by learning criticism, a method for analyzing and evaluating the techniques and consequences of a message or conversation. We will explore this question by studying case studies of the arguments writers, activists, preachers, comedians, and everyday figures have employed to shape this culture. Assignments may include: two essays, a discussion leading assignment, and a multi-part digital publishing project. This course is ideal for students who want to sharpen their lenses for understanding and employing writing and communication strategies that promote social justice efforts.

ENWR 3900 - Career-Based Writing/Rhetoric

TR 03:30PM-04:45PM
Kevin Smith

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design.

Undergraduate Courses