Undergraduate Course Descriptions | Spring 2021

Courses

Spring 2021 Course Open House

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing (7 sections)

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements. 

001
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Andrew Eaton

002
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Hannah Dierdorff

003
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Kyle Marbut

004
MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
Hodges Adams

005
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Jeddie Sophronius

007
TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Raisa Tolchinsky

008
MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Michelle Gottschlich

ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing (6 sections)

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.

003
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Gahl Pratt Pardes

004
TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Severance

005
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Sahika Gurler

006
MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Acacia Johnson

007
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Fina Mbabazi

008
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Roberto Rodriguez Jr.

ENCW 3310-001 - Intermediate Poetry Writing: Hindsight 2020

M 200-430 (Online Synchronous)
Kiki Petrosino

Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. 

If you have complicated feelings about the year-that-was, you’re not alone. Looking back on 2020, historians will tell a harrowing story of climate change, the coronavirus pandemic, a tense U.S. presidential election, and a raft of other events, large and small, that shaped these extraordinary twelve months. At every stage, poets of all backgrounds have worked and wept, sung and meditated, while creating art that responds, in vibrant language, to the challenges of this moment. In this online intermediate-level workshop, we’ll take a look at several exciting works of poetry published in 2020. These readings will be supplemented by the voices of journalists, podcasters, scholars, and thinkers who will help us place 2020 in context.  Through class discussion, critical and creative writing exercises, and peer review (“workshop”), we’ll aim to analyze the concerns—political, personal, philosophical and aesthetic—that poets engaged over the past year. This is a digital course. Class meetings will take place synchronously on Zoom or other teleconferencing platform. Asynchronous assignments will be posted to UVA COLLAB. The semester will culminate in a Final Portfolio collecting original and final drafts of 7-10 poems, plus a Final Essay that analyzes one or more salient themes from this year in poetry.  

ENCW 3310-002 - Intermediate Poetry Writing: Notebook Poetics

T 500-730 (In Person with Remote Option)
Brian Teare

This poetry workshop is structured around thematically focused writing, reading, and critical thinking assignments. Our readings will explore notebook poetics, a unique genre with roots in Japanese poetic diaries of the medieval period, pioneered by writers as different as Sei Shonagon and Matsuo Basho. The travel journal, pillowbook, poetic diary, haibun, and zuihitsu all feed into the generic stretchiness of contemporary notebook poetics, which can incorporate haiku and free verse, found text, iPhone images, diary entries, and field notes written down while on foot, etc. As Joanne Kyger, a contemporary practitioner of notebook poetics, says, the genre is “a completely free and open form, anything and everything can go into the pages.” Together as colleagues and critics, alone as writers and readers, we’ll be keeping our own notebooks and thinking about how poets in particular use the notebook space as a site 1) for honing the skill of paying attention to the world, and 2) for catching hold of time as it passes in all its political, ecological, and autobiographical specificity. When reading, we’ll move through very different versions of notebook poetics, including work by Rick Barot, Brenda Hillman, Larry Eigner, Etel Adnan, and Kimiko Hahn. For the first three “cold-reading” workshops, we’ll turn in short poems in response to writing prompts designed to test our powers of attention, while the final workshop portion of the course will offer each of us the chance to catch time in longer excerpts from our poetic notebooks-in-progress. Throughout the semester, in both critical discussions and workshops, we’ll discuss the conceptual, political, and poetic aspirations of the work we read, and together explore the possibilities of genre and the practices of writing, paying attention, and catching time. 

ENCW 3610-001 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

R 400-630 (Online Synchronous)
Micheline Marcom

ENCW 3610-002 - Intermediate Fiction Writing / Manners and Techniques

W 100-330 (Hybrid) Dawson's Row 1 105
Jane Alison

An intermediate class for imaginative students who want to expand their skills in writing literary fiction and experiment with some different manners it can take: realist stories, metafictions, fabulist tales, faux nonfictions, and so on. We’ll begin with a series of exercises to develop your narrative techniques—playing with scales of syntax; controlling time; sculpting a fictional world; manipulating readerly expectations; rendering thought—and ultimately you’ll compose and workshop two short stories or one much longer one.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to ten pages) to me at jas2ad@virginia.edu. Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken, and whether you’re applying to other workshops.  

ENCW 4350-001 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing / The Observatorium 

M 200-430 (Hybrid) Dawson's Row 1 105
Jane Alison

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to direct their senses fully toward the world around them, to discover both how minutely they can perceive and how expansive their vision can be. We’ll examine how other writers have cast their senses, scientific minds, beliefs, and literary bloodlines outward and then converted their perceptions into living prose. You’ll cycle through a series of micro-essays in which you’ll write about single subjects—an insect, maybe, a human face, an artifact, room, smell, or movement—drawing upon close observation and your most inventively associative mind to transform what you see into art. Working from these short pieces, you’ll develop a longer essay that will be a literary site of artful exploration.

To be considered for this class, please send a piece of prose (up to ten pages) to me at jas2ad@virginia.edu. Attach a note telling me who you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken, and whether you’re applying to others.  

ENCW 4550-001 - Topics in Literary Prose: Book to Film

R 1000-1230 (Online Synchronous)
Thomas Pierce

In this course we will explore the artistic & technical challenges of adapting literary work to the screen.  We will be reading, watching, and responding to a wide array of short stories, novels, scripts, and films. You will be expected to write short critical responses to these works -- and to write and plan your own adaptations. If you have any questions, email me at tap2ae@virginia.edu.

ENCW 4720-001 - Literary Prose Thesis

T 500-730 (Hybrid) Dawson's Row 1 105
Elizabeth Denton

Directed writing project for students in the English Department's Undergraduate Area Program in Literary Prose, leading to completion of an extended piece of creative prose writing. To whatever extent possible, class will meet in both small, in-person groups and virtually.

ENCW 4810-001 - Advanced Fiction Writing I

R 200-430 (Online Synchronous)
Christopher Tilghman

ENCW 4820-001 - Poetry Program Poetics Seminar: This Is Not My Beautiful House 

W 200-430 (Online Synchronous)
Kiki Petrosino

Where is home for you right now? Your nest, your nook, your habitat? These pandemic days have drawn many of us indoors, to the unique interiors of our lives and minds. Like a poem, a house makes room for ghosts and daydreams. A house can wall off memory or preserve a moment in time. Often, a house hides as much as it reveals; it crumbles, catches fire, and lasts forever. In this APPW seminar, we’ll look at poems that engage concepts of “home,” and use these works as inspiration for our own writing about place, space, and the imagination. As Gaston Bachelard observes, “our house is our corner of the world.” From haunted houses to grand country homes, we’ll enter many rooms of thought and expression in this seminar. Course texts in poetry will be available in a mix of print and electronic formats. About halfway through the course, students will propose a Final Creative Project on a topic of their choice, related to the course theme; the latter weeks of the semester will be reserved for workshopping the ongoing projects. This is a digital course. Class meetings will take place synchronously on Zoom or other teleconferencing platform. Asynchronous assignments will be posted to UVA COLLAB. The final grade will calculate attendance, participation, written assignments, and the Final Creative Project. 

ENCW 4830-001 - Advanced Poetry Writing I

R 200-430 (Online Synchronous)
Debra Nystrom

Restricted to Instructor Permission.

This workshop is for students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft.  Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to keep a poetry journal, to attend at least two poetry readings, to turn in three close-reading responses, and to participate in a group presentation.  A particular focus for this class will be examining and experimenting with various formal possibilities for making poems.  Poetry arose out of magic and spell, and we’ll explore the ways such effects are available to us now, as we consider received forms and their contemporary variations, including formal opportunities to be found at the liminal space between poetry and prose.  In our reading we will attend to the interplay of sound, rhythm and syntax in creating suspense as well as interweaving designs whose relations are registered in subliminal ways.  Students will be invited to try out different forms, but may also feel free to range beyond formal structures, for poems to find the shapes they need.  

Instructor Permission is required for registration.  APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT, preferably by Dec. 15, to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu.  Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules.

ENCW 4920-001 - Poetry Program Capstone Seminar

(Online Synchronous)
Lisa Spaar

The Capstone project is a semester-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work.  The course involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor.  After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading.  The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.   This is course is open only to students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, who must apply for permission to enroll through SIS.

ENCW 5310-001 - Advanced Poetry Writing II

T 200-430 (Online Synchronous)
Rita Dove

This workshop is for both graduate students (including MFA fiction students) and advanced undergraduate students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft.  Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to complete two assignments generated by writing prompts, to attend two virtual poetry readings and provide written responses, to turn in close-reading reviews of two assigned poetry books, and to complete one “wild card” assignment.

Instructor permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT electronically in Word to Professor Dove’s email address at rfd4b@virginia.edu by Dec 1; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes or before, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

English Literature

ENGL 2500-001 - Intro to Literary Studies

MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Stephen Arata

The broad purposes of this course are to introduce you to ways of understanding texts within the discipline of literary studies and to improve your skills in critical thinking and writing. We will devote an equal amount of time (more or less) to reading lyric poetry, drama, and narrative fiction. The poems will be drawn from the last four centuries of Anglophone verse, from Shakespeare to Okot p’Bitek (and much in between). Our plays will be Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information. For narrative fiction, we’ll read at least one novel (to be determined later) and short fiction by Chimamanda Adichie, Yiyung Li, and Jhumpa Lahiri. In addition to regular brief writing assignments, requirements will include three 5-6 page essays. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

ENGL 2500-002 - Intro to Literary Studies

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Herbert Tucker

Open to all comers who seek to deepen and intensify their experience of literature, this course more specifically aims to impart and hone the skills that a prospective English major needs when advancing through the departmental curriculum. The syllabus varies from year to year, but analysis of literary genres in verse, prose narrative, and drama will be faithfully emphasized.  As we practice reading, we'll also get lots of practice writing that peculiar genre the critical essay, a form with demands and pleasures of its own. We'll look closely, think widely, speak boldly, and write clearly in overnight exercises, shorter and longer essays, midterm and final exams and, above all, focussed and collaborative in-class discussion. A group visit to a local theater is pretty unlikely this semester, but let us hope and, if necessary, cope.  A digital resource, “For Better for Verse,” will help to improve acquaintance with the metrics of poetry.  Casual registration with a view solely to the Second Writing Requirement is discouraged: there are many easier options out there.

ENGL 2502 - Arthurian Afterlives

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Valerie Voight

This course will explore some literary lives and afterlives of King Arthur and his court. We'll examine how authors use the otherworld of chivalric romance to construct fantasies of English nationalism and confront complicated political and theological problems. As part of our quest, we'll cycle through Arthur's reincarnations in a variety of literary forms from the medieval period through the present day. Possible texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, excerpts from Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur, Alfred Lord Tennyson's The Idylls of The King, T.H. White's The Once and Future King, and J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fall of Arthur.

ENGL 2504-001 - American Hope

MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Lloyd Sy

Hope has always pervaded conceptions of America. This course will investigate the intellectual, literary, and emotional traditions of hope originating in the Massachusetts Bay Colony's self-determination as a “City Upon a Hill”: the ardent belief that Americans have in themselves and their societies. But this course will also study texts that question mainstream notions of hope by pointing out their flaws, gaps, shortcomings, and nefarious purposes. Who might get excluded or ignored by hope? Why is America so invested in finding hope—especially in dismal moments like our present? How do American artists represent hope in prose, poetry, drama, and film? No experience in American studies or literature is necessary. Our texts will probably be creations of: Winthrop, Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, David Walker, Thoreau, Dickinson, Jewett, Booker T. Washington, Cather, McCullers, Bulosan, Wilder, Hansberry, Momaday, and Ang Lee. This course fulfills the college’s second writing requirement.

ENGL 2506-001 - Introduction to Poetry

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Walter Jost

Mindful of your own words? Intrigued by what seems designed to confuse you? Summoned by some spirit? Skeptical about the cash value of reading poetry in a world of internet memes and Breaking News? This introductory course invites you to talk through shared intuitions, hesitations, doubts, and hopes with like-minded others. The semester is centered on close reading and class discussion of selected American poets. One-paragraph responses for class preparation, and three five-page papers. Meets Second Writing Requirement.

ENGL 2506-002 - Introduction to Poetry

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Walter Jost

Mindful of your own words? Intrigued by what seems designed to confuse you? Summoned by some spirit? Skeptical about the cash value of reading poetry in a world of internet memes and Breaking News? This introductory course invites you to talk through shared intuitions, hesitations, doubts, and hopes with like-minded others. The semester is centered on close reading and class discussion of selected American poets. One-paragraph responses for class preparation, and three five-page papers. Meets Second Writing Requirement.

ENGL 2506-003 - Defending Poetry

TR 1230-145 (Hybrid with Remote Option) New Cabell 323
Samuel Walker

Plato famously banished poets from his ideal republic, denouncing poetry’s distance from truth and reason.  This course will explore how poets across time have defended their art against this and other charges.  We will try to understand how poetry works, how poems make music and meaning, through the lens of poetry’s value.  Defenses of poetry - prose works that describe the merits of the artform and its role in society - will constitute roughly half of our reading. Alongside each defense, we will consider a handful of contemporaneous poems.  While the second half of the course will be largely populated with modern and contemporary poets, we will spend several weeks discussing earlier defenses and poems, and this course is well suited for students who want to explore several periods of poetry in English.  Guiding questions include: How does poetry instruct us, and how does it give us delight?  How has the role of poetry changed over the centuries?  What role does poetry play in our present moment? What is the relationship between political action and poetic making?  What forms of knowledge are unique to poetry?

ENGL 2506-004 - Lyric and Short Forms

TR 930-1045 (In Person) Wilson 402
Matt Davis

This course is an introduction to poetry for students who have little or no previous experience reading poetry. We will study a handful of English and American poets who wrote accentual-syllabic verse in the past 400 years. Our focus will be on short lyric poems and sonnets, and we will spend at least two weeks reading each of the following poets: Robert Frost, Thomas Hardy, Robert Herrick, W. B. Yeats, and Emily Dickinson. I will make an effort to arrange the material from easiest to hardest.  Students will learn techniques for making sense of poetry and practice “scanning” poems (marking stressed and unstressed syllables) using the For Better for Verse website. They will read John Carey’s A Little History of Poetry, a chapter or two at a time, to get a sense of the history and development of poetry over the centuries and a tiny taste of some poets we are not studying. Students will also write two or three short essays and memorize a sonnet. Because of Covid-19, this may turn out to be an online course with Zoom meetings. Whether or not the class is online, I intend to use the cooperative annotation tool Perusall for asynchronous reading and discussion of poems.

ENGL 2506-005 - 20th-Century Poetics: Formalism to Deconstruction

TR 1100-1215 (In Person with Remote Option) Clark 101
Andie Waterman

This course covers key movements in 20th-century poetics from Russian formalism (Yuri Tynianov, Viktor Shklovsky) to practical criticism in Britain (I.A. Richards, William Empson) and its influence on Anglo-American New Criticism (Cleanth Brooks, John Crowe Ransom, Austin Warren and René Wellek), through the structuralist moment (Roman Jakobson, Claude Lévi-Strauss) and post-structuralist responses to this moment (Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida), and concludes with the theory and practice of the Language poets (Charles Bernstein, Lyn Hejinian). We will spend at least a week looking at counter-currents against the more dominant voices in the vibrant journal culture of the interwar period, as well as how dominant voices were established, with selections from The Partisan Review, The Kenyon Review, Scrutiny and The Criterion. We will also look at several poems per week alongside the critical readings, with a good portion of these poems to be selected by students from their own outside reading. Key questions include: what is poetics, for the 20th century? Does it grow from engagement with a specific canon or canons? How did the cultural and political pressures of the 20th century shape its concerns with linguistics, semiotics, and communication theory? What views of literature and the world are afforded by its preoccupations, and what views does it elide? How does it define itself against literary theory more broadly? How can 21st-century critics redefine poetics for our own moment?

ENGL 2507-001 - Identity, Race, and Religion in Renaissance Drama

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Adriana Streifer

How can Hamlet help us understand the origins of current beliefs about identity and individuality? What can we learn from Othello and The Merchant of Venice about Renaissance understandings of race and religion? And how can both plays help us make sense of contemporary expressions of racism and antisemitism? In this course, we will study the theater of the English Renaissance in order to help us understand where our own ideas about identity come from. We live in an era marked by fierce debates about race, religion, nationalism, gender, and sexuality, but these topics were equally pressing (though in different ways) to authors such as Shakespeare and Marlowe, and to their audiences. Our goal is to step outside of ourselves and engage in imaginative time travel, so that we may understand how race, religion, and identity were and are culturally constructed, both in their time, and in our own. As we read, we will ask ourselves: What makes stage characters seem like “real” people to us? How do marginalized figures in drama "speak out" against dominant narratives? As values and social norms change over time, how have scholars, directors, actors, and students responded to, reclaimed, and reinterpreted literature that many argue contains racist and prejudiced elements? Throughout the course, we will grapple with these questions, and with others that enable us to consider how early modern dramatic texts articulate many divergent ideas about selfhood and identity.

This course will include opportunities to watch plays (both films and filmed stage productions). You will not be required to attend screenings at particular times, but you should consider your ability to make time in your schedule to watch long-ish productions outside of class hours before enrolling in this course.

ENGL 2507-002 - Studies in Drama: Plays and Performance Texts of the 21st Century

TR 500-615 (Hybrid with Remote Option)
Anna Martin-Beecher

In this course you’ll discover and analyse a broad, exciting range of contemporary plays and performance texts and explore questions including:

What exactly is theatre?
How does writing for the stage differ from other literatures?
How are modern writers and makers developing and departing from theatrical tradition?
What makes a play/performance text ‘work’?

With a focus on British and American theatre of the last two decades, we’ll study plays including Annie Baker’s The Flick and Duncan Macmillan’s People, Places and Things, as well as collaboratively written texts and work that sits on the boundary between play and performance art, from artists such as Bryony Kimmings and Geoff Sobelle.

This course is for anyone seeking to understand writing for the stage and expand their knowledge of the kind of theatre being created today. It may also be of interest to aspiring playwrights, directors and performers. Assessment will be based on reading responses, class discussion, presentations, essays and examination. 

ENGL 2508-001 - Future Shock!

MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Patricia Sullivan

In this course, we will read novels, particularly science fiction and speculative fiction that imagine futures, some near and quite believable, others quite far away and fantastical. How do these novels help us explore our fears and desires about the future, as well as critically reflect on our past and present? The novels we read might address issues such as future societies (dystopias or utopias), the fate of the earth (climate fiction), the changing nature of the human and artificial intelligence, animal rights, robot revolutions, the internet and what comes after, space travel, Afrofuturism and more.

In addition to considering the genres of science fiction and speculative fiction, we will also practice close reading strategies; reflect on acts of interpretation through brief references to critical essays; inquire into some of the functions and effects of narratives, and grapple with imaginative representations of worlds and times similar and not so similar to our own. Students will write regular reading responses, lead discussions, write two essays, and take a final exam. 

ENGL 2508-002 - Displacement and Migration

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
David Coyoca

In this course we will analyze Asian-American, African-American, and Indigenous stories of displacement, (im)migration, and settlement. Through comparative analysis, we will discuss the various intersections between and divergences among these texts, paying particular attention to the shared histories the texts evidence. Our goal is to form interpretive arguments that address the ways in which the texts negotiate ideas about the nation, nation building, and national belonging.

ENGL 2527-002 - Shakespeare's Political Thought

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Evan Cheney

For modern Americans, the word "political" often calls to mind the negative connotations of partisanship and unprincipled self-interest. However, when Shakespeare uses "politic," it is often in the sense of being "prudent" or "sensible." Politics, therefore, raises questions about right rule and involves attraction, organization, exchange, negotiation, and sometimes conflict and violence. How does an individual or a community govern itself well? How does one form and break connections with others? What role does language play in the negotiation of power?

 

Although he was writing during the early modern period in England, Shakespeare's political thought spans across time and space. This course examines the variety of political forms Shakespeare draws upon in his poetry and plays, across a range of genres. In settings as diverse as ancient Rome, medieval England, and early modern Venice, Shakespeare stages the political concerns of these communities, exploring themes relevant to political regimes and to individuals. These themes include consent, legitimacy of birth and dynasty, and freedom and bondage.

 

Such a vast scope allows Shakespeare to consider the political problems created by competing systems of order, thought, belief, and value. Whether these systems are natural, supernatural, or cosmological; classical, medieval or early modern; pagan or Christian; Puritan or Catholic; English or foreign; or related to monarchy or republican rule, Shakespeare's work regularly imagines and brings to life the tensions persons and societies experience when conflicting modes of thinking collide. Efforts to solve to such political concerns unite or divide us; they can separate individuals and cultures, or provide the basis for a common humanity.

 

ENGL 2527-003 - Civic Shakespeare

TR 330-445 (Hybrid with Remote Option) Dell 2 103
Emelye Keyser

Fall of 2020 is bringing big changes to Washington D.C. Yes, an election, but just blocks from the White House, the Folger Shakespeare Library is undergoing a renovation. This class takes up both of these occurrences to ask: what does Shakespeare have to do with American civic life? Should Shakespeare's words--which have been used to incite social justice movements and to justify colonial violence--be made to speak to our democratic politics? This course will look both at Shakespeare in his own context as well as the uses and abuses of Shakespeare across crises and revolutions in history.

ENGL 2592-001 - Contemporary Women's Texts

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Susan Fraiman

An introduction to close reading and critical writing focused on recent works by women in a variety of genres and from a range of national contexts. Possible works (still to be determined) include stories by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative of growing up by U.S. cartoonist Lynda Barry; a film directed by Lebanese-American Rola Nashef; images by queer, South African photographer Zanele Muholi; a poetic work combining autobiography and anti-racist critique by Claudia Rankine. Our discussion of these texts will address basic formal issues: modes of narration; the difference between “story” and “plot”; the use of framing and other structural devices; the constraints of genre; the handling of images, tone, and diction. Likely thematic concerns include the effects of colonialism and migration on women; explorations by women of growing up, growing old, marriage, maternity, queer sexuality, work, and creativity; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, race, and class; the divergent meanings of feminism for women around the world.  We will work not only on becoming attentive readers but also on learning to conceive and organize effective critical essays.  This writing intensive course (three papers totaling 20 pages) satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement. This course is restricted to 1st- and 2nd-year students. 3rd- and 4th-years who have never taken a college-level literature course may contact the instructor to seek special permission.

ENGL 2592-002 - Women in Literature

MW 500-615 (Hybrid) Bond 106
Cassie Davies

In this course, we will be reading contemporary texts by women that explore various aspects of female identity. The final reading list is still to be determined, but it will include authors of nonfiction and fiction from a range of national contexts, such as Sangeeta Bandyopadhyay, Chimamanda Adichie, Mieko Kawakami, Annie Ernaux, and Maxine Hong Kingston. Some of the themes likely to be covered include sexuality, marriage, maternity, work, and creativity. This writing intensive course satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement. This course is restricted to 1st- and 2nd-year students. 3rd- and 4th-years who have never taken a college-level literature course may contact the instructor to seek special permission.

ENGL 2599-001 - Uncovering 19th- and 20th-Century British Writers of Color

MWF 900-950 (Online Synchronous)
Indu Ohri

In your high school English classes, I am sure you heard of and read books by Victorian and Modernist English authors like Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, and Virginia Woolf. But have you heard of Mary Prince (the author of a famous British slave narrative), Rabindranath Tagore (the first Asian winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature), or Lafcadio Hearn (the most famous “interpreter” of Japan for the West)? This class will invite you to learn more about the lives and writings of these fascinating non-Western Victorian and Modernist writers by metaphorically visiting different parts of the British empire. During your global voyage, you will read British writers of color from the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa, who wrote about their experiences living under imperial rule in published novels, essays, and poetry. You will look at the counternarratives these authors produced, in which they explore encounters with the English from the perspective of the Other.

Along the way, you will join in the recent calls to “undiscipline” Victorian and Modernist studies by studying, researching, writing about the literature and theory of British people of color. Besides reading these authors, you will examine literary criticism that discusses the need to diversify scholarship and college curriculums to be more inclusive and embrace the voices of non-Western writers. In this course, you will uncover a rich literary tradition and make a significant contribution to this emerging scholarly conversation in Victorian and Modernist studies. Toward the end of our global journey, you will possibly collaborate with scholars to “undiscipline” Victorian studies for students, academics, and others. Tentative authors include Mary Prince, Mary Seacole, Joseph Conrad, Rabindranath Tagore, Sarojini Naidu, Lafcadio Hearn, Setsuko Koizumi, Chinua Achebe, and others. 

ENGL 2599-002 - Food in Literature

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Stephenson

Which fork do I use anyway, and why does it matter? What can you tell about me by looking at my lunch? “You are what you eat”—is that really true? How do meals, both in the literature we read and the lives we live, reflect, perpetuate, resist, and redefine cultural values, political leanings, gender roles, and race relations? We will explore these questions, and many more!  Using different types of writing, including journal entries, online forum posts, in-class exercises, peer reviews, and formal essays, we consider the ways in which depictions of food in novels, poems, short stories, and film affect how we understand power relationships, cultural difference, memory, family, and host of other topics. Texts are not limited to but will include To the Lighthouse (Virginia Woolf), The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison), and “Fish Cheeks” (Amy Tan), as well as poetry poetry by Li-Young Li, Seamus Heaney, and Sylvia Plath, among others.

ENGL 2599-003 - The Contemporary Essay

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
John Casteen IV

This course will examine literary prose in contemporary literature, ranging from more topical nonfiction to the personal, lyric, and experimental essay; it will also include two essay-films.  The idea of the essay—the attempt—requires uncertainty and poise.  How do writers and artists use the expressive potential of this elastic form to navigate the situation of the present?  Students will explore critical approaches to the essay and compose new work of their own.

ENGL 2599-004 - Animals and Literature

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Lindgren Johnson

This class will consider animal lives and deaths in a range of literary and cinematic classics through the lens of the new field of vegan theory (which is about SO much more than what you eat!). We will cover a range of genres, from children’s literature to slave narratives to horror films. Some questions we will consider: How and why are the “livestock” alongside whom Frederick Douglass is commodified subjects of ethical concern in his 1845 Narrative? Is Charlotte’s Web a novel that teaches children that animal deaths are mournable, or not? What is the nature of the creature in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, who is “created” out of both human and animal corpses taken from the lab and the slaughterhouse? What about Hemingway, the iconic figure of white masculinity, who grounded so much of his persona in violence against animals yet often contradicted his own persona in his writing? And what about horror films? How might the genre of horror change if we embraced rather than eschewed “animality”? This is all to say…we will consider the ways that texts—literary and cinematic--both enable and prohibit a recognition of animal lives and deaths as we also struggle to join efforts to create a just world for all species.

ENGL 2599-005 - The World Wars in European Lit

MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah Cole

The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a film, poem, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, an in-class presentation, and weekly discussion questions. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, Heinrich Böll, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.

ENGL 2599-007 - Nature and Romanticism

MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Jon D'Errico

In our reading, discussions, and writing this semester, we will explore the development of a modern view of "nature" and "natural" in the transatlantic English-language tradition, especially as connected to how these artists think of human nature. Our readings will include some of the expected ports-of-call for this sort of excursion (Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Emerson, Thoreau, and their cultural heirs), but the texts will range widely, including not only short fiction, poetry, novels, essays, and drama, but also some song lyrics, diary entries, film excerpts, and side trips into the visual arts.

The class satisfies the second writing requirement, and it is appropriate for students considering declaring a major (or minor) in English, as well as for smart and motivated non-majors looking to sharpen already solid writing skills.

ENGL 2599-008 - The Medieval Globe

TR 500-615 (Hybrid) Dell 2 100
DeVan Ard

Forget about quaint images of the shire and "Little England": medieval British people moved busily around the globe. On pilgrimage, crusade, or quest, the literary characters we will meet in this course reflect the expanding geographical scope of English writing in the later Middle Ages. In readings of major works of literature (in the original Middle English!) we will learn and practice the basics of literary analysis. We will also look at medieval mappae mundi (maps of the world) and visual representations of the globe. Finally, we will consider the ways that the texts we read put new pressure on contemporary discussions of race, migration, and nationhood.

Texts will include selected Canterbury TalesSir Gawain and the Green Knight (with its later adaptation, The Turke and Sir Gawain), Mandeville's Travels, and The Book of Margery Kempe, a first-person account of the life of a fifteenth-century woman mystic.

ENGL 2599-009 - Monsters and Monstrosity

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Mrinalini Chakravorty

This course explores the emergence of the monstrous aesthetic across several genres (epic, drama, novel, poetry, film) and periods (renaissance to contemporary) to probe the shifting terrains of sexual, racial, and cultural otherness that monsters represent.  Our reading list includes works by William Shakespeare, R.L. Stevenson, Mary Shelley, Octavia Butler, and Patricia Highsmith, among others, as well as several gothic films.

ENGL 2599-010 - Exquisite Corpses: Experiments in Collective Authorship

MW 500-615 (Hybrid)
Piers Gelly

In this course, we will examine various texts (novels, films, songs, performance art pieces, political documents) that were created by more than one person. We will ask whether it’s possible to create an artwork that is really and truly a collective production, and we will consider what might be gained from artworks that are the product of more than one brain. We will also ask larger questions about authorship and democracy: What is an author? What does it mean to have a voice? In what ways does the past speak through us? How might we create a society in which all are truly heard?

Texts may include:

NICK AND NORAH’S INFINITE PLAYLIST, by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan;
A NEST OF NINNIES, by John Ashbery & James Schuyler;
VERA & LINUS, by Jesse Ball & Thordis Bjornsdottir;
CAVERNS, by O U. Levon;
THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH;
THE ARABIAN NIGHTS;
A THOUSAND PLATEAUS, by Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari;
“Theater Piece No. 1,” by John Cage;
GRAPEFRUIT, by Yoko Ono;
MYSTERIOUS OBJECT AT NOON, by Apichatpong Weerasethakul;
THE WHITE ALBUM, by Weezer;
DONUTS, by J Dilla;
COSMOGRAMMA, by Flying Lotus;
A SEAT AT THE TABLE, by Solange;
“The Combahee River Collective Statement,” by the Combahee River Collective;
CITIZENS UNITED V. FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION, by the Supreme Court of the United States

ENGL 2599-011 - Literature of the American Frontier

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Eva Latterner

The borderland known as the "frontier" has occupied the American imagination since the first European settlements in the New World. This course will interrogate how the frontier has been imagined as a space of national desire, dread, enterprise and experimentation from Jefferson to the contemporary Western. Considering US legal discourse, fiction, essays, films and Marlboro ads, we will address questions of gender, race, class and national belonging, asking why the frontier has historically been imagined as a white and masculine space, and how fantasies of the frontier endure into the present moment.

ENGL 2599-012 - Literature of Protest

MWF 900-950 (In Person) Wilson 402
Amber McBride

ENGL 2599-013 - Versions of Emily Dickinson

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah Storti

In recent years, Emily Dickinson has been the subject of several films and a popular tv series—they present conflicting portraits of the poet as lonely recluse, passionate lover, and radical young artist. Scholars meanwhile are engaged in an impassioned debate about how her work should be interpreted, edited, and read. In this class we will attend closely to the incredible poems and letters of Emily Dickinson in an effort to understand why she remains so compelling (and controversial) more than one hundred years after her death. We’ll also consider formal matters (how does one read a lyric poem? what’s with the dashes?), textuality (editorial issues including textual variants, manuscripts, and her groupings of poems), and some works by Dickinson’s contemporaries. Finally, the course will propose that we think of Dickinson as a resource in times of trouble. You may already know that she wrote her poems in a kind of voluntary quarantine, and that she chose to be physically (though not, as we’ll see, textually) distant from others for much of her life. I hope that as we investigate her brilliant work, we might also learn a bit about how to cope in our own difficult historical moment.

ENGL 2599-014 - Versions of Emily Dickinson

TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah Storti

In recent years, Emily Dickinson has been the subject of several films and a popular tv series—they present conflicting portraits of the poet as lonely recluse, passionate lover, and radical young artist. Scholars meanwhile are engaged in an impassioned debate about how her work should be interpreted, edited, and read. In this class we will attend closely to the incredible poems and letters of Emily Dickinson in an effort to understand why she remains so compelling (and controversial) more than one hundred years after her death. We’ll also consider formal matters (how does one read a lyric poem? what’s with the dashes?), textuality (editorial issues including textual variants, manuscripts, and her groupings of poems), and some works by Dickinson’s contemporaries. Finally, the course will propose that we think of Dickinson as a resource in times of trouble. You may already know that she wrote her poems in a kind of voluntary quarantine, and that she chose to be physically (though not, as we’ll see, textually) distant from others for much of her life. I hope that as we investigate her brilliant work, we might also learn a bit about how to cope in our own difficult historical moment.

ENGL 2599-015 - Childhood Memory in Literature

TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Jessica Walker

Childhood memory. Why does it burn so bright? Scar so deep? How does it influence the way we tell our stories and our understanding of self? How does recollection of formative years vary in fiction versus nonfiction? In what ways can writing about childhood contend with the sensory, the sexual, the adult world, trauma, family, the power of place? In this course we will look at a variety of prose works and a few films to examine the role of childhood memory in literature.

This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement. 
 

Readings will include works such as:

Selections from Swann's Way by Marcel Proust and The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
The Sea by John Banville
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark
Corregidora by Gayl Jones
Little Failure by Gary Shteyngart
Speak, Memory by Vladimir Nabokov
Heavy by Kiese Laymon
The Liars' Club by Mary Karr

Short stories and essays by Joyce Carol Oates, Junot Diaz, Alice Munro, Z.Z. Packer, John Edgar Wideman, Louise Erdrich and others

ENGL 2599-016 - Inventing Selves, Inventing Others

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Wei Liu

Designed for beginners and non-majors, this course offers a brief survey of modern and contemporary Anglophone literature through the lens of self-fashioning and the dialectic between self and other. Since the turn of the twentieth century, writers have developed new ways of representing the self through renovating such techniques as the dramatic monologue, first-person narration, focalization and third-person limited point of view. These techniques also point to larger questions about identity formation and cross-cultural encounter: aesthetic ideologies that put individuality at risk and re-inscribe gender and racial violence, colonial legacies that perpetuate cultural hierarchies in the age of globalization, cosmopolitan impulses that clash with private concerns and indigenous customs, etc. Through close textual analysis, we will enhance our sensibility to literary forms as well as rethink literature’s political and ethical valences in today’s world. This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Reading list (tentative): T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov, John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Maxine Hong Kingston, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka, Agha Shahid Ali, Kazuo Ishiguro

Requirements: participation, discussion posts, three papers (one 4-page close reading exercise + two 6-7 pp. critical essays), and a final exam.

ENGL 2599-017 - The Southern Short Story

TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Heidi Siegrist

What is it we’re talking about when we talk about “Southern” literature and culture? This class will tackle that thorny question through the short story form, in texts spanning from the early 20th century to the present. We’ll explore historical memory, regionalism and nationalism, and geographies of race, gender, and sexuality. In addition to short stories, we’ll examine other cultural texts, from manifestos to music videos to cookbooks.

Tentative reading list: Dorothy Allison, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Randall Kenan, Flannery O’Connor, Peter Taylor, Monique Truong, Alice Walker

ENGL 2599-018 - Literature of Fantasy

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Casey Ireland

How do we recognize a text as a work of fantasy literature when we read it? The supernatural is a must, but is magic? What about dragons and knights, boy wizards, or evil queens? This class explores contemporary literature as well as texts from genres that precede and inform modern fantasy. We’ll read N.K. Jemisin and Neil Gaiman alongside medieval romance, 18th century fairytales, Gothic horror, and magic realism. Over the course of the semester, we’ll consider the ways writers use fantasy to comment on society— or provide an escape from it. Requirements will include three papers and a final exam.

ENGL 2599-019 - Literature as Memes

MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
James Ascher

If you think about it, memes and literature have many similarities: both can entertain or offend, both explain history and require context, and both are fun to talk and think about.

This class treats literature as not unlike memes: we will read radical modernist Djuna Barnes's Ladies Almanack for queer hints, canonical mock-heroic, Alexander Pope's Dunciad for sick burns, and deceptively *not* children's literature, Lewis Carroll's Alice for a glimpse of Victorian England.  Along with these texts, I will show you the basic tools needed for literary and memetic research.

ENGL 2599-020 - Literature as Memes

MW 630-745 (Online Synchronous)
James Ascher

If you think about it, memes and literature have many similarities: both can entertain or offend, both explain history and require context, and both are fun to talk and think about.

This class treats literature as not unlike memes: we will read radical modernist Djuna Barnes's Ladies Almanack for queer hints, canonical mock-heroic, Alexander Pope's Dunciad for sick burns, and deceptively *not* children's literature, Lewis Carroll's Alice for a glimpse of Victorian England.  Along with these texts, I will show you the basic tools needed for literary and memetic research.

ENGL 2599-021 - Literature and Inequality

TR 200-315 (In Person) Clark 102
Michael VanHoose

This course follows the long shadow that economic inequality casts over British literature written between 1730–1860. These years produced obscene extremes of wealth and want: country houses and balls straight out of a Jane Austen novel for some, but for others urban squalor that can only be described as Dickensian. Armed with select readings in history, economics, and literary theory, we’ll investigate literary texts as sites of encounter between rich and poor, leisured and laboring, titled and disenfranchised. Fiction will take up much of the course reading. We’ll pace ourselves reading Dickens’s Bleak House in serialized parts, as its original audience did (albeit at an accelerated pace), and we’ll also read novels by Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth, and George Eliot. Other readings will include poetry by and about the working class, ephemeral street literature, and excerpts from the political economy of Smith, Marx and Engels, and Thomas Piketty. 
 
Over the semester, you’ll write three formal essays—a close reading, a critical conversation essay, and an original research paper—as well as few informal writing assignments and a final exam. The course places emphasis on class participation, peer review, and revision.

ENGL 2910-001 - Point of View Journalism

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Lisa Goff

This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Hunter Thompson, and Barbara Ehrenreich in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, Breitbart News Network) and left (ViceJacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Jia Tolentino, and Sarah Smarsh. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.

ENGL 3002 - History of Literatures in English II

MW 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
John O'Brien and Victoria Olwell

William Wordsworth, Toni Morrison, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, Emily Dickinson, James Joyce, Zora Neale Hurston, T. S. Eliot: these are some—but not all— of the authors we will be reading and studying together. This class will survey literature in English from around 1800 to the present moment. We will start with the emergence of Romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century and trace the emergence of English as a global language and literature in our post-colonial world. Our itinerary will include stops in Britain, the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, and India. This course is part of the two-semester sequence of the history of literature in English (along with ENGL 3001) that is required of English majors, but is open to anyone interested in exploring some of the most significant works of literature of the last two-plus centuries. You do not need to have taken ENGL 3001 first; the courses can be completed in any order that works best for you.

ENGL 3025-001 - African American English

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Connie Chic Smith

Black English, Negro dialect, Ebonics, Black slang, and African American English Vernacular (AAEV) are just a few of the names that have been used historically to describe the form of communication that occurs among and between many African Americans.  Rickford & Rickford (2000) define AAEV as the informal speech of many African Americans.

Yet, for as long as there have been Africans in America, this form of communication has been assigned the same designation given to individuals who create and have spoken it for generations; inferior and inappropriate.  The belief that AAEV is a derogatory or demeaning manner in which to speak has been ingrained in the psyche of America and Americans.  This ideology has remained intact until recently.

This course examines the communicative practices of AAEV to explore how a marginalized language dynamic has made major transitions into American mainstream discourse.  AAEV is no longer solely the informal speech of many African Americans; it is the way Americans speak.

ENGL 3161-001 - Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Elizabeth Fowler

We’ll read a handful of the unforgettable Tales, leading up to a month on the spectacular Knight’s Tale; the goal is to immerse you in medieval story-telling and help you see behind the curtain into the writer’s workshop. Some ingredients: Amazons under house arrest, fairies dancing in rings, living knights discovered under a heap of dead corpses, Queen Guinevere sentencing a rapist to find out what women actually desire, a girl who threatens her new husband with murder by an invisible angel if he so much as touches her, a tattle-tale crow, sex in a tree, very well educated chickens, the most infamous fart in literature.  The Middle Ages are a strange otherworld; we’ll investigate how things as apparently universal as love, faith, and death are different before the modern era. You'll learn to read Middle English and get skilled at “unpacking” short passages of text and describing how words and images work to produce the responses of readers.  Along the way, we will find out what you think about Chaucer’s ambitions — comic, philosophical, poetic. Commitment to real conversation, two short papers, and two exams required.  This transparent course is designed for beginners, but it’s also a lot of fun if you’re experienced.

ENGL 3273 - Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances

MW 1000-1050
Clare Kinney

A survey of the second half of Shakespeare's career: the major tragedies and the late plays (the so-called “romances”). Among the things we’ll be looking at: genre, gender, and performance; the power of love and the love of power in tragic and tragi-comic universes; alienation, transgression, “tragic knowledge”––and writing beyond tragedy. 
Plays we’ll read: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest.
Course Requirements: Regular attendance at lectures and lively participation in discussion section; two 6-7 page papers; midterm; final.

PLEASE NOTE: the lecture portion of this course will be uploaded asynchronously as cloud recordings; discussion meetings will meet via zoom in real time.

ENGL 3310-001 - Eighteenthth-Century Women Writers

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments in Britain converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre in eighteenth century Britain. Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – letters, drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways.

Class requirements include semiweekly (i.e. one for each class meeting) discussion thread posts; two thesis-driven essays; a poetry annotation assignment; and an essay-based final exam. Our class meetings will promote discussion and student participation and as much as possible.

ENGL 3321-001 -  Remember Travelling?

MW 330-445 (Hybrid with Remote Option) Chemistry 217
Cynthia Wall

By the second half of the eighteenth century, the British were virtually zooming (and I mean that literally, not in todayspeak) around their island and the world.  Improvements in roads and coaches, expanded trade routes, scientific sea voyages, and the ambitions of empire meant more people travelling more easily both at home and abroad, visiting other houses, other cities, and other cultures, and writing about it. They were equally interested in the wonders of their own backyard. We will explore the rhetorics of discovery (and remember what it means to travel to other places! to see people outside our bubble! to live beyond Zoomworld! ) in letters, diaries, journals, biographies, travel narratives,  country house guides, ship’s logs, poems, plays, and novels, reading works by James Boswell, Frances Burney, Mary Delany, Jane Austen, Humphry Repton, William Cowper, Gilbert White, Samuel Johnson, Olaudah Equiano, Lord Chesterfield, Matthew Lewis, William Bligh, and Captain Cook.  One short paper (25%), one midterm (25%), a group presentation (20%), biweekly commentaries (5%), and a final exam (20%), part take-home and part in-class.  Attendance is required and participation expected (5%).

ENGL 3482-001 - The Fiction of Empire

MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Paul Cantor

This course deals with the interplay between literature and British imperialism in the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include orientalism and the representation of the foreign, the ideology of imperialism, literary critiques of imperialism, the impact of imperialism on domestic life in Britain, the problem of heroism on the imperial frontier, the intersection between fiction of empire and other genres (such as science fiction, horror stories, and detective fiction), as well as the relationship between late Victorian popular culture and serious fiction, especially the emergence of literary modernism out of fiction of empire. Authors studied include Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Jules Verne, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, H. G. Wells, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Course requirements include two short papers and a final examination.

ENGL 3500-001 - Hacking for Humanists

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Brad Pasanek

This is a course for English majors (and other students) that introduces the basics of computer programming, text analysis, text encoding, and statistics as experimental methodologies that promote new kinds of reading and interpretation. The aim is to move from "computation into criticism." We’ll work, primarily, with a Shakespeare play, poetry by William Blake, and a Jane Austen novel. Students will find these works at the bookstore alongside manuals on Learning Unix and Text Analysis with R. No prior familiarity with coding or the language R required: we’ll be moving slowly, covering the basics. Advanced Computer Science majors will not be turned away, but they will be required to recite poetry aloud in front of their peers and show an interest in Emma Woodhouse’s misprisions.

ENGL 3510-001 - Thomas Malory’s King Arthur

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Elizabeth Fowler

We’ll explore Le Morte Darthur, the spell-binding compendium of stories about King Arthur's round table, Sir Lancelot’s heroism, and Lady Guenevere’s passion. It’s the most influential early prose fiction in English, one that still produces imitations, sequels, and prequels in every medium known to art. Writing a century after Chaucer and a century before Shakespeare, the addictive Malory is curiously dry, full of terse, flat statements of shocking, magical, moving acts. We'll puzzle over what makes the book tick: narrative, imagery, style, politics. We’ll have five quizzes and some flash writing sprees and two short (~5-page) creative projects or papers (writers, artists, architects, and game developers: feel welcome to develop your skills!).

ENGL 3540-001 - Dangerous Women

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Cristina Griffin

When the phrase “nasty woman” rose to the forefront of our cultural discourse, the label rested on a long-standing conception that women can be dangerous just by being women. In this class, we will look at the particular formations of dangerous women that materialized in the nineteenth century, an era in which women simultaneously remained held down by the law and yet unbound by newly possible social roles. Across texts by Jane Austen, Mary Prince, Christina Rossetti, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, George Eliot, George Bernard Shaw, and Thomas Hardy, among others, we will consider what precisely made women dangerous as well as the other side of the coin: what put women in danger? What forms of female agency, sexuality, or sociability generate power and which engender fear? And what do we make of men’s roles: what does it look like to be a dangerous man or a man in danger? How do nineteenth-century notions of danger reify a gender binary and what are the ways in which this binary breaks down or becomes fluid? By reading texts across genres—some novels, short stories, poems, essays, and a play—we will immerse ourselves in the particular history of gender, fear, and power articulated by nineteenth-century writers while also avidly seeking out points of connection between these Victorian conceptions of dangerous women and those of our own twenty-first century. Students in this course are forewarned that they will be in danger of reading dangerously fascinating texts, and will be expected to generate dangerously fascinating ideas in response.

ENGL 3559-001 - Snorri Sturluson and the Prose Tradition in Medieval Iceland

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
John Casteen III

By any estimate, Snorri was the dominant writer and historian of the European North during the thirteenth century.  Born into wealth and power in Iceland in 1197, at the Icelandic Commonwealth’s highwater mark, Snorri was fostered from age 3 or 4 by Jón Loftsson, an Icelandic power broker and kinsman of the kings of Norway – arguably, the most powerful man in Iceland prior to Snorri.  Snorri had a superb education and flexible, intense habits of mind.  A powerful landowner, a political, aggressive chieftain, and twice speaker of the Althing, Snorri is best known now as a poet and biographer and the presumed author of Egil’s Saga.  In his own time, he was known, often hated, as a politician, frequent agent provocateur on the wrong side of deals and alliances, and even as one who tried to broker away Iceland’s independence.  Snorri’s enemies trapped him in 1241 and killed him inside his house at Reykholt.  Not long after, the Icelandic Commonwealth descended into anarchy and civil war, and Iceland turned itself over to the rule of the kings of Denmark.   

Readings include the Eddas, with Gylfaginning and other sections on which modern knowledge of Norse mythology is based, as well as Heimskringla (Lives of the Kings of Norway), Egil’s Saga, and the life of Snorri in Sturla Thordsson’s Sturlunga Saga, all in translation.  One course essay, and an essay exam.

ENGL 3559-002 - Pursuing Happiness

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Lorna Martens

Fictions of happiness pursued--and found!  Through the ages, people have sought  happiness and formulated conceptions of what happiness means.  Happiness could be something we once had--then lost--but might find again; something we might achieve by acting wisely or performing meritorious deeds; something possible through escape; alternatively, something available in the here and now; bound up with love or recognition from others; or a byproduct of creativity, independent of others.  This course is not a self-help course.  Don’t take it expecting to find the key to happiness.  This is a literature course.  We’ll read fiction, poetry, theory.  But we will read some cheerful and uplifting (or at least moderately cheerful or uplifting) literature, as an intellectual antidote to the gloom and doom of the current pandemic, while we wait for a scientific antidote.   Texts to be chosen from Chrétien, Rousseau, Schiller, Novalis, Wordsworth, Emerson, Valéry, Hunt, Rilke, Hilton, Stevens, Giono, Nabokov, I. Grekova, Wolf

ENGL 3560-001 - Currents in African Literature: Adichie and Okorafor

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Njelle Hamilton

Cross-listed with AAS 3745

This undergraduate seminar takes the form of an in-depth study of the literary works of two brilliant, prolific young Nigerian women writers: feminist and social realist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and African-futurist Nnedi Okorafor, two of the most globally well-known and -loved authors the continent has produced. Through close analysis of their novels and other writings we will consider broad questions such as: How applicable are Western feminist theories to non-Western experiences? How are traditional literary forms such as the bildungsroman subverted by race, gender, and postcoloniality? How do sociopolitical realities inform literary expression? How does trauma affect narrative? How is Nigeria depicted in international news in contrast to how locals perceive and narrate their own reality? And how can these novels help us understand the contemporary African novel within the contexts of larger historical and cultural forces, events, and movements? Beyond affording you a deeper appreciation for African and Nigerian literature, history, and current events, this course will lead you through the process of crafting a sophisticated argument and writing about literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts.

ENGL 3560-002 - Modern American Poetry

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Kevin Hart

This seminar introduces students to a range of American poets living and working, for the most part, in the second half of the twentieth century. Of particular interest are the ways in which these poets responded to other poetries than those written in English, especially to the poetries of Europe and South America. What can poets learn by translating poetry from another language? What are the limits of what one can and cannot do in writing poems in English? How does “American poetry” change by exposing itself to influences from Europe and South America? These questions will be considered by way of reading poems (and translations) by Robert Bly, Louise Glück, W. S. Merwin, Charles Simic, A. E. Stallings, Mark Strand, and Charles Wright. Students will also read poems, in English translation, by a range of European and South American poets, including (but not limited to) Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Philippe Jaccottet, Roberto Juarroz, Eugenio Montale, Vasko Popa, and Tomas Tranströmer.

ENGL 3560-003 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Mark Edmundson

The mid-twentieth century in America sees and explosion of great poetry. More different kinds of consequential poets, more different sorts of poems than the nation had seen before. We’ll start with the understated genius, Elizabeth Bishop, and move on to Robert Lowell, inspired early prophet of the sorrows and woes of the American empire. Then on to others: the daring, ever fertile Sylvia Plath; superb political and erotic poet, Adrienne Rich; Robert Hayden, poet of African American sorrows and hopes; Allen Ginsberg, author of nation-shaking Howl. Engagements too with the skillful,sharp Gwendolyn Brooks; visionary Amy Clampitt; Southern sage James Dickey; James Merrill, perhaps America’s most sophisticated poet; gritty, tender James Wright; and the vastly influential John Ashbery, Closer to the present, we’ll check in with America’s two most recent Nobel Prize winners, Bob Dylan and Louise Glück.

ENGL 3560-004 - Kafka and His Doubles

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Lorna Martens

The course will introduce the enigmatic work of Franz Kafka:  stories including "The Judgment," "The Metamorphosis," "A Country Doctor," "A Report to an Academy," "A Hunger Artist," "The Burrow," and "Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk"; one of his three unpublished novels (The Trial); the Letter to His Father; and some short parables.  But we will also look at Kafka's "doubles":  the literary tradition he works with and the way in which he, in turn, forms literary tradition.  Thus: Kafka: Cervantes, Kafka: Bible, Kafka: Aesop, Kafka: Dostoevsky, Kafka: Melville; Kafka: O'Connor, Kafka: Singer; Kafka: Calvino, Kafka: Borges.  Readings will center on four principal themes: conflicts with others and the self (and Kafka's psychological vision); the double; the play with paradox and infinity; and artists and animals.  A seminar limited to 20 participants. Requirements include a short midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper (10-12 pages).

ENGL 3570-001 - Hemispheric Latinx Literature

TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Carmen Lamas

Cross-listed as AMST 3323.

This course offers a survey of Latinx literature from a hemispheric perspective. We explore how the histories of US, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia come together to produce novels, poems, essays, and films that are now referred to as distinctly Latinx. In addition to exploring the integrated global histories that produce Latinidades, we will analyze how race, class, gender and sexuality impact Latinx literature, film and other artistic forms. All readings, writing, and discussions are in English.

ENGL 3570-002 - Short Stories of the Americas

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Anna Brickhouse

This course explores short stories from and about the Americas, from the nineteenth century through the contemporary period: Victor Séjour, Edgar Allan Poe, Elena Garro, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Junot Díaz, Jenny Zhang, Rebecca Roanhorse, Tommy Orange, among others.

ENGL 3610-100 - Global Cultural Studies

MW 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Michael Levenson

Cross-listed with GSGS 3030

Global Cultural Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to world cultures during the decades just before and after this new millennium.  Engaging with a wide variety of media (including film, popular song, avant-garde art, memoir, political philosophy), the course emphasizes the recent conditions of China, India, North and South Africa, and the Middle East.  Important events – such as the plight of refugees around the world, the rise of China as super-power, the place of Gandhi in present-day Indian politics, the aspirations and failures of the Arab spring  – will be major focal points.  At every stage, we consider the making of our present-day world since 1945 and the urgent issues that inform it: the campaign for international human rights, the independence movements in Africa and Asia, the resurgence of religious faith around the world, the crisis of the environment, the plague of Covid, the rise of nationalism.

ENGL 3730-001 - American Literature of 20th C.

MW 330-445 (In Person with Remote Option) Claude Moore G010
Stephen Cushman

We'll begin by surveying twentieth-century American literature through the lens of the short story, warming up with examples published in the 1890s by Kate Chopin, Charles Chesnutt, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and Stephen Crane.  Then we'll move the survey through modernism (e.g., Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, William Carlos Williams, Jean Toomer, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright) toward mid-century, with, among others, Eudora Welty, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Flannery O'Connor.  From there our path leads through the second half of the twentieth century and into the first decade of the twenty-first with Donald Barthelme, Philip Roth, Joyce Carol Oates, Louise Erdrich, Ha Jin, David Foster Wallace, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

At mid-semester the syllabus will change, turning to twentieth-century works chosen by members of the class, divided into small groups, with each group responsible for choosing a particular work, writer, or selection of writings, fiction or non-fiction, verse or prose.  Each group will decide whether it wants to order another (inexpensive) book, use material available online, or scan its selection.  Please come to the first class with ideas about two or three particular titles or authors you'd like to read in good company.  Our text for the first part of the semester will be THE OXFORD BOOK OF AMERICAN SHORT STORIES (2nd ed., 2012), ed. by Joyce Carol Oates.

ENGL 3740 - Introduction to Asian American Studies

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Karen Huang

Cross-listed with AMST 3180

An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama.

ENGL 3815-001 - Theories of Reading

MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Rita Felski

How and why do we read? And what is the relationship between academic reading and the kind of reading we do for pleasure? This course is divided into two parts. The first part, on critical reading, surveys influential forms of literary theory, including structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, feminism, postcolonialism, and queer theory.  In the second half, we will explore everyday experiences of reading that are either ignored or treated with suspicion in literary theory:  identification and recognition; empathy; enchantment and self-loss; horror and shock; fandom and the pleasure of collective reading. The goal of the course is to explore the similarities and differences between reading inside and outside the classroom and to examine the emotional as well as intellectual dimensions of interpretation.

ENGL 3825-001 - Desktop Publishing

(Online Asynchronous)
Jeb Livingood

ENGL 3840-001 - Contemporary Disability Theory

MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
Christopher Krentz

Cross-listed as ASL 3410.

In the last several decades, thinking about people with physical, cognitive, and sensory differences has moved from a mostly pathological medical-based understanding to a more rights-based framework.  In this course we will consider how conceptions of disability have changed and how these theories relate to the depiction of disabled people in literature.  The syllabus is still under constructions, but we will likely study critical theory by writers like Goffman, Davis, Nussbaum, Siebers, Quayson, Davidson, Puar, and Erevelles; read literature such as Wells’ “The Country of the Blind,” Morrison’s Sula, Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Raine’s Tribes, and Sinha’s Animal’s People; and probably study a documentary film or two.  Requirements include thoughtful preparation and participation, group leading of discussion, two 5-6 page papers, quizzes, and a reading journal.   

ENGL 3940-001 - Tutoring Peer Writers

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Marcus Meade

Prepares undergraduates to tutor peer writers by introducing them to theories of writing and practices of peer tutoring. Successful completion of the course will qualify students to apply for part-time paid peer tutoring positions in the Writing Center. Students may also use this course to prepare for volunteering as writing tutors in their local communities.

ENGL 4500-001 - Literature and Environmental Justice

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Mary Kuhn

From chemical spills to soil contamination, natural resource extraction to pollution, species extinction and climate change, we live on a planet rife with harm caused by human consumption. One lesson of the global climate crisis is that its detrimental effects are inescapable. They affect everyone and everything. Yet risk and harm are not evenly distributed. Some communities have long borne the brunt of these processes while others have remained relatively unscathed. Industry has made some places unlivable and laws protect some better than others. The current climate crisis throws such inequalities into stark relief. 

This course considers how literature has navigated the relationship between environmental practices and social justice. We’ll consider how authors have incorporated a call for environmental justice into their literary worldmaking. And we’ll explore how they might help us see, imagine, and fight for more egalitarian presents and futures. What models of justice and repair might literature offer us?

ENGL 4500-002 - Sally Heming's University

TR 930-1045 (In Person) Minor 125
Lisa Woolfork

In August 2018, Dean of the University of Virginia’s College of Arts and Sciences Ian Baucom welcomed new and returning faculty advisors with remarks about the state of the college. He emphasized the need for the college to persist in its pursuit of inclusion and diversity by saying, “this is as much Sally Hemings’s university as it is Thomas Jefferson’s.” This course “Sally Hemings’s University.” My objective is to prepare students to reconfigure the status quo which is currently shaped by the normalization of extremism, to help students appreciate the shift from euphemisms (“racially-charged” or “racially-tinged”) to vocabularies of consequence (“racist” or “white supremacist”), to foster a facility for talking capably and comfortably about uncomfortable topics such as systems of domination and their influence upon university and daily life. “Sally Hemings’s University” is a site where the adverse effects of overt and subtle forms of white supremacy, patriarchy, capitalism and other systems of dominance are scrutinized at a location closely aligned with the founding of this nation. As a course, “Sally Hemings’s University” will explore questions generated by re-framing “Mr. Jefferson’s University” as a site that destabilizes the dominant narrative of the university as Jefferson’s primary property and by extension that of similarly entitled white men.

The course will engage creative pedagogies to explore the curricular and cultural consequences of imagining the University of Virginia through the lens of a marginalized enslaved black woman.  Building upon the two Engagement courses I recently developed, my scholarly research in African American literary and cultural production, and in collaboration with a variety of resources on grounds and in the city, the course will take students though a robust series of academic readings, tours, vernacular intellectual formations such as podcasts and blogs to better understand white supremacy and consider what it means to dismantle it. White supremacy, as I remind my students, is not only neo-Nazis and confederate sympathizers marching and physically assaulting students on campus. This system of domination is also subtly routinized in a number of ways including the continual decline of black student enrollment even as the university declares each incoming class more “diverse” than the last, the overrepresentation of black people in university service roles seeming to correspond with their underrepresentation among the faculty, “The Black Tax” (a colloquialism to describe the invisible yet emotionally weighty burden shouldered by black folks at predominantly white institutions), or even hearing from white peers “you’re pretty for a black girl.”  The course will consider the influence of systems of white supremacist and other forms of domination in relation to power and privilege in the context of UVA, Charlottesville, and the nation.

ENGL 4510-001 - Medieval Lyric

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Bruce Holsinger

This seminar will explore the fascinating world of lyric poetry in medieval Europe, from Latin hymns to troubadour and trobairitz love songs to the Middle English lyrics of the later Middle Ages. We'll read lyric poems by authors such as Hrotsvitha, Hildegard of Bingen, the Comtessa de Dia, Francis Petrarch, Geoffrey Chaucer, Merecina of Gerona, Guillaume de Machaut, and many others, in Latin, Italian, Hebrew, Arabic, Spanish, French, Occitan, Old and Middle English, and other languages (all but Middle English examples will be provided in translation). Our emphasis will be on close reading and analysis of individual poems and collections of poems, though we'll pay some attention to the manuscript contexts of medieval lyric. The seminar will also rely on students' own expertise as consumers of contemporary lyric, much of which has its roots in premodern forms. Coursework will consist of short writing assignments, active participation in class discussions, and a final seminar paper at the end of the semester.

ENGL 4520-001 - Place and Exile in Early Modernity

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Dan Kinney

ENGL 4530-001 - English Poetry: Restoration to Revolution (1660-1789)

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Michael Suarez

This class will focus on the close reading of eighteenth-century poetic texts.  The course is arranged topically around such themes as The Poetry of Loss (Gray’s Elegy Written in a Country Church Yard), The Poetry of Love, Courtship, and Marriage (Alexander Pope’s Eloisa to Abelard & Mary Leapor’s An Essay on Woman), and The Poetry of Land and Nation James Thompson’s Rule, Britannia & Oliver Goldsmith’s The Deserted Village. Students will be given opportunities to explore the alternative canon, to consider the relationship between the C18 publishing world and literary celebrity, to learn about the roles of poetry in the construction of public and private identities, & to explore the practice of poetry by women authors. Together we will learn how to read poetry both extensively and intensively. This seminar is demanding, but those who stay the course will find that, with time and effort, the primary texts will yield genuine intellectual and aesthetic rewards.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.  -- Prof Suarez  mfs3x@virginia.edu

ENGL 4530-002 - Gothic Forms

MW 200-315 (Hybrid w/ Remote Option) Bond 106
Cynthia Wall

Gothic literature burst onto the scene in the eighteenth century with ruined castles, ethereal music, brooding villains and surprisingly sturdy heroines, all performing as metaphors of our deepest fears and fiercest resistances. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the gothic continued as a genre of cultural anxiety. This seminar will survey gothic literature through both history and genre: from the classic novels, such as Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1797), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) (and Mel Brooks’s 1974 Young Frankenstein), Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818) and Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959) (with the classic 1963 film version The Haunting); through the poetry of John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Christina Rossetti; the plays of Matthew Lewis and Richard Brinsley Peake; and the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. W. Jacobs, Richard Matheson, and Stephen King. And we will ask ourselves: What are we afraid of? Active participation, a presentation, weekly short commentaries*, one short paper (5-7pp) and one longer research paper (10-12pp).

ENGL 4540-001 - Literature and Science in the Nineteenth Century

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Paul Cantor

This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.

ENGL 4560-001 - Ecofeminist Poetics

TR 200-315 (In Person with Remote Option) Maury 115
Brian Teare

In October of 2018, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released an unequivocal new report: “There is alarming evidence that important tipping points, leading to irreversible changes in major ecosystems and the planetary climate system, may already have been reached or passed.” This seminar will explore this historic moment of irreversible biospheric change – a new geological era some scientists call the Anthropocene – through the critical perspectives offered by feminist and environmental thought and the creative perspectives offered by poetry. As a literature survey, this course explores an understudied tradition in Modernist and Postmodern North American environmental writing: women whose poetry articulates both a feminist poetics and a vision of feminist ecological citizenship. The survey spans a century, from Anne Spencer’s Harlem Renaissance-era poems of Black Nature to Brenda Hillman’s contemporary poetic experiments in direct action, trance consciousness, and watershed mapping. As an introduction to ecofeminist theory, ecofeminist poetics, and intersectional ecologies, this course poses questions central to the ever-evolving discourses of ecofeminism and ecopoetics: what roles do gender, sex, sexuality, and race play in our relationships to the natural world? What roles do they play in shaping environmental politics, policies, and actions? What ethical contracts do feminist ecological citizens make with each other, with capitalist globalized culture, with the more-than-human world, and with language? How might an ecofeminist poem behave, aesthetically? What political values might it espouse? Paired with curated readings in ecopoetics, ecocriticism, and feminist and critical race theories, poetry by four Modernist and four Postmodern ecofeminist poets will serve as our guides to the poetics of the Anthropocene – which will also be the focus of our final papers. During the first half of the semester each of us will be researching and compiling an annotated bibliography that will form the critical archive from which our final papers will draw. These papers will be drafted in completion, then peer-reviewed and conferenced, before being polished for a final grade.

ENGL 4560-002 - Contemporary Women's Texts

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Susan Fraiman

This course takes up recent Anglophone works by women across multiple genres and referencing a range of national contexts. Primary texts include visual as well as literary forms. A selection of secondary materials will help to gloss their formal, thematic, and ideological characteristics while giving students a taste of contemporary theory in such areas as gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.  Possible works (still to be determined) include fiction by Gish Jen, Jhumpa Lahiri, Alice Munro, and Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative by Lynda Barry; a play by Annie Baker; experimental, multi-genre works by Claudia Rankine, Saidiya Hartman, and Maggie Nelson; a film by Lebanese-American director Rola Nashef; images by South African photographer Zanele Muholi. Among our likely concerns will be the juxtaposition of verbal and visual elements in a single text; depictions of queer, raced, immigrant, and transnational subjectivities; narratives that make “truth claims” and how such claims affect the reader; representations of growing up, aging, migration, maternity, violence, marriage, creativity, diverse sexualities, and work; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, class, and race.  One project of the course will be to explore its own premise that “women’s texts” is a useful and meaningful category. Two papers and a final exam. This course is intended for 3rd- and 4th-year English majors or other advanced students with a background in literary/cultural/gender studies.

ENGL 4560-003 - Caribbean Sci-Fi and Fantasy

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Njelle Hamilton

Cross-listed with AAS 4570.

Superheroes, space operas, time travel, futuristic tech — the stuff of dreams and the subject of countless popular literary and cultural works over the past century. Far too long featuring mainly white male heroes and US or European settings, sci-fi and fantasy (SF/F) have become increasingly diverse in recent years, even as reframed definitions open up archives of previously overlooked black and brown genre writing from across the globe. Still, the Caribbean is often ignored, imagined either as a rustic beach or a technological backwater. In this undergraduate seminar, however, you will encounter Caribbean writers working at the cutting edge of SF/F, and discover novels, stories, artwork and film that center Caribbean settings, peoples, and culture, even as they expand the definition of genre. Authors and auteurs from the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean might include: Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, Junot Díaz, Rita Indiana, Marcia Douglas, Ernest Pepin, René Depestre, and Agustín de Rojas. We will also discuss supporting turns by Caribbean actors in mainstream works such as Star Trek and Black Panther. Assignments will include short critical essays and a long research paper where you think through how Caribbean texts redefine, expand, or critique mainstream SF/F. Meets the Second writing requirement.

ENGL 4560-004 - Literature of West Africa

MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Stephen Arata

In this seminar we will read widely and deeply in Anglophone West African literature of the last 60 years, with roughly equal attention given to prose fiction, drama, and poetry. Likely candidates for our reading list include Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe, Chimananda Adichie, Kofi Awoonor, Christopher Okigbo, Ama Ata Aidoo, Helon Habila, Inua Ellams, Ben Okri, Helen Oyeyemi, Emmanuel Iduma, Chigozi Obioma, and Yaa Gyasi. Requirements will include two essays and a handful of shorter writing assignments.

ENGL 4560-005 - American Novels, American Controversies

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Victoria Olwell

How do recent U.S. novels enter into contemporary political and social questions? As works of fiction, what particular expressive resources do novels bring public discourse? If novels seek to persuade readers to adopt a position, how do they do so? This course approaches such questions by considering novels alongside select contemporary non-fiction. The novels in the course address such issues as climate change, mass incarceration, immigration, women’s status, and modern Native American identity. Readings will include works by Toni Morrison, Rachel Kushner, Tommy Orange, Richard Powers, Naomi Alderman, Laila Lalami, Essi Edugyan, Tayari Jones, and Ocean Vuong. In addition to reading novels and sources related to contemporary issues, we’ll also study the history and aesthetics of the novel. Course requirements will include two 7-page papers, a final exam, and energetic class participation.

ENGL 4560-006 - Sports and Transnational Culture

TR 930-1045 (In Person) Dell 2 103
Sandhya Shukla

ENGL 4561-003 - Poetry in a Global Age

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Jahan Ramazani

How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. The writers we will read range from modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Kolatkar, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, and Daljit Nagra. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; co-leading of discussion; and two substantial papers involving research and close reading. Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical texts.

ENGL 4561-004 - The Queer Novel

TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Mrinalini Chakravorty

What is “queer” about the novel?  Our course will grapple with this question by examining the rich legacy of non-normative sexual expressions and orientations in the literary arts.  The aim of the course is—

  1. To understand what constitutes ‘queer literature’ as a meaningful genre or archive.  Is the queer novel unique in its expressivity, in terms of style and content?  Does the queer novel have its own canon?  Should this canon be more open to revision than others given the constant evolutions in how we understand gender?
  2. To see how novels engage political ideas of sexuality germane to thinking about queerness, such as of ‘homophobia,’ the ‘closet,’ 'inversion’ ‘gender bending,’ ‘cis-acting,’ ‘coming out,’ ‘failure,’ ‘deviance,’ ‘camp,’ ‘cruising,’ ‘queer futurity,’ ‘queer feeling,’ ‘homonationalism,’ ‘disidentification,’ ‘performitivity,’ ‘flamboyance,’ etc.  
  3. To confront radical questions about subjectivity and embodiment that the analytic of sexuality enables us to ask about the worlds we inhabit and the texts that represent these worlds.  

To accomplish these goals, we will read sweepingly across the whole breadth of the queer canon.  We will begin with early classics (by Radclyffe Hall, Virginia Woolf, E.M.Forster) of queer literature and then shift our attention to more contemporary transnational contexts concerned with representing queerness as a part of, and not apart from, affiliations of race, culture, religion, geography, class etc.  Our reading includes works by Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Ali Smith, Leslie Feinberg, Michael Cunningham, Shyam Selvadurai, Alison Bechdel, Saleem Haddad, and Shaani Mootoo among others.  In other words, we will think of the important ways that the evolution of the queer novel involves a perpetual re-queering of the genre itself by the insistent heterogeneity of racial, transnational, and transgender contexts.  While most of the novels we read will come from the Anglophone tradition, some will be translated from other languages.

This course will require that students be prepared to engage directly and fearlessly with the field of queer theory.  Queer theory will inform how we contextualize the subcultures of queerness (from Bloomsbury or Stonewall to Queer-of-Color activisms), as well as understand why notions of reproductive normality, eroticism, pleasure, kinship, and indeed queer identity have been transformed in recent literary and aesthetic works.  Ultimately, we will ask how queer aesthetic works speak to, revise, and must be re-evaluated given the shifting dynamics of queer thought.  Here our reading includes work by Michel Foucault, David Halperin, Judith Butler Jasbir Puar, Monique Wittig, Adrienne Rich, Judith Halberstam, Sara Ahmed, Lee Edelman, Jose Munoz,  Marlon Ross, and others.  Finally, a selection of salient films, poems, and short stories will allow us to see useful connections between the aesthetic and political charge—often one of transgression—that the sign of the “queer” carries.

ENGL 4561-005 - Literature and Human Rights

MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Christopher Krentz

What does literature have to do with human rights, with the aspirational effort to ensure the protection of persons everywhere from persecution and deprivation?  In this course we will begin by considering the history of human rights, including debates over their legitimacy.  Then we will study recent theory on the relationship of rights to literature and read a variety of relevant contemporary fiction.  The syllabus is still under construction, but possibilities here include Danticat’s The Farming of Bones, Coetzee’s Disgrace, Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost, Sinha’s Animal’s People, Abani’s Song for Night, and Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis.  These works often deal with difficult, troubling topics, but they do so with grace and occasionally unexpected beauty.  Requirements include the usual careful preparation and participation, quizzes, a 5-page paper, and a 10-page research paper.     

ENGL 4580-001 - Race in American Places

T 500-730 (Online Synchronous)
Ian Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar uses the method of Critical Landscape Analysis to explore how everyday places and spaces, “landscapes,” are involved in the negotiation of power in American society.  Landscapes, as we engage the idea, may encompass seemingly private spaces (within the walls of a suburban bungalow or of a government subsidized apartment) to seemingly public spaces (the vest pocket park in lower Manhattan where the Occupy Movement was launched in September 2011; the Downtown Mall, with its many privately operated outdoor cafés, that occupy the path along which East Main Street once flowed freely in Charlottesville; or even the space of invisible AM and FM radio waves that the FCC supposedly regulates in the public’s interest).  We launch our exploration by considering landscapes as arenas of the Culture Wars.  With this context, we unearth ways in which places are planned, designed, constructed, and mythologized in the struggle to assert and enforce social (especially racial) distinctions, difference, and hierarchy.  You will be moved to understand how publicly financed freeways were planned not only to facilitate some citizens’ modern progress, but also to block others from  accessing rights, protections, and opportunities to which casually we believe all "Americans" are entitled.  We study landscapes not only as represented in written and non-written forms, but also through direct sensory, emotional, and intellectual experience during two mandatory field trips to places in our region.  In addition to informal group exercises and individual mid-term exam, critical field trip reflection paper, and final exam, you are required to complete in small groups a final research project on a topic you choose that relates to the seminar.  Past topics have ranged from the racial politics of farmers’ markets in gentrifying inner cities to the gender--and the transgender exclusion—politics of  universal standards for public restroom pictograms.  Students showcase such results in an informal symposium that culminates the semester.  Not only will you expand the complexity and scope of your critical thinking abilities, but also you will never again experience as ordinary the spaces and places you encounter from day to day.

ENGL 4580-002 - Critical Race Theory

R 500-730 (Online Synchronous)
Marlon Ross

What does race mean in the late 20th and early 21st century? Given the various ways in which race as a biological “fact” has been discredited, why and how does race continue to have vital significance in politics, economics, education, culture, arts, mass media, and everyday social realities? How has the notion of race shaped, and been shaped by, changing relations to other experiences of identity stemming from sexuality, class, disability, multiculturalism, nationality, and globalism? This course surveys major trends in black literary and cultural theory from the 1960s to the present, focusing on a series of critical flashpoints that have occurred over the last several decades. These flashpoints include: 1) the crisis over black authenticity during the Black Power/ Black Arts movement; 2) the schisms related to womanism (or women of color feminism), focused on Alice Walker’s novel The Color Purple and the Steven Spielberg film adaptation; 3) the debate over the social construction of race (poststructuralist theory); 4) the debate over queer racial identities, focused on two films, Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman and Barry Jenkins’ 2016 film Moonlight; 5) racial violence and the law, focused on the Ferguson and the Black Lives Matter movement; and 6) the aesthetic movement called Afrofuturism. Other reading will include a variety of theoretical essays and chapters drawn from different disciplines, including legal theory, film and media studies, sociology, history, political theory, and hip hop studies. While concentrating on theories of race deriving from African American studies, we’ll also touch on key texts from Native American, Asian-American, and Chicanx studies. The goal of the course is to give you a solid grounding in the vocabulary, key figures, concepts, debates, and discursive styles comprising the broad sweep of theoretical race studies from the late- twentieth century to the present, and to nurture your own theorizing about race and its deep cultural impact.

ENGL 4590-001 - Poetry and Theology

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Kevin Hart

Cross listed with RELG 4810.

This seminar seeks to develop a close reading of major religious poetry by two major religious poets.

ENGL 4999-001 - Distinguished Majors Program

(In Person)
Mary Kuhn

ENGL 5559-001 - Contemporary Jewish Fiction: History, Memory, Rewriting the Past

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Caroline Rody

This course, designed for both graduate students and upper level undergraduates, will consider creative returns to the past in post-World War II Jewish American literature, a young literature with roots in formidable textual, cultural, and religious traditions. In the texts of this course we will observe an evolving relationship to memory and inheritance as burdens or as creative touchstones in secular, modern cultural forms; to traditional Jewish texts and religious practice; to Yiddish and the culture of Yiddishkeit; and to forms of Jewish humor, spirituality, and political engagement. At the same time, our syllabus will unfold a drama of Americanization, including changing notions about personal, linguistic, and national identity; about gender roles; and about communal and aesthetic affiliation in a multiethnic society. Several authors take up the difficult project of re-encountering and reframing the Holocaust, in startlingly anti-realist, darkly comic literary visions. And some practice writing as rewriting, inscribing themselves in a literary web by reanimating key Jewish texts and writers of the past. A key figure at the course’s opening is the great Yiddish writer Isaac Bashevis Singer. Others likely included are Grace Paley, Alfred Kazin, Elie Wiesel, Lore Segal, Art Spiegelman, Philip Roth, Nathan Englander, Allegra Goodman, and David Bezmozgis. A final unit will focus on the remarkable collective reimagination of the work and life of Polish-Jewish surrealist writer (and Holocaust victim) Bruno Schulz, reconjured into contemporary fiction by writers we will read including Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, Nicole Krauss, and Jonathan Safran Foer. Texts include short stories, novels, and critical essays. Requirements: all reading, active class participation, co-leading of a class discussion, several short reading responses, a short and a long paper, the latter with creative options.

ENGL 5559-002 - Milton and Whitman

TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Mark Edmundson

This course is restricted to 3rd & 4th year undergraduates, and English MAs.

We’ll read with care and imagination what are perhaps the two greatest long poems in the English language, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself. Both are works of palpable genius, but of very different kinds. Milton’s poem is committed to hierarchy, order and degree. In his cosmos, justified subordination and command are the highest ideals. His world at its best is firmly and yet in its way flexibly ordered. He is a brilliant exemplar of true conservatism. Whitman is rather different. “Unscrew the locks from the doors / Unscrew the doors themselves from their jams,” Walt chants. Whitman wants to dissolve all needless boundaries in the interest of perfect democratic equality. He wants to undo the barriers between old and young, Black and White, rich and poor, women and men. And he does so, at least imaginatively, in Song. We’ll read the poems for what they are in and of themselves. But we’ll also consider them as brilliant exemplars of the progressive mind and its conservative counterpart. Students may be surprised as to where they fall in this mapping. With any luck, we’ll find ourselves, in the words of the Whitmanian, Wallace Stevens, “more truly and more strange.”

ENGL 5559-003 - Narratives of Teaching

M 630-900 (Hybrid) Wilson 214
Jim Seitz

This course will examine a variety of ways in which teaching has been represented through narrative—sometimes by teachers and sometimes by students—in memoir, fiction, scholarship, and film. We’ll work on sharpening both our critical resistance to the shortcomings of these narratives and our critical appreciation of their accomplishments. All narratives of teaching are inevitably partial: nobody can say it all, even when representing a single class, much less what they managed to teach or learn during the course of a month or a year or the duration of their time at a particular school. Yet writers do try to portray a teacher’s work over long as well as brief periods of time, and we can learn from their struggle to do so convincingly.

ENGL 5830-001 - World Religions & Literatures: The Bible

F 1000-1230 (In Person with Remote Option) Location TBD.
Stephen Cushman

The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century.  Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, from Genesis to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts.  Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary.  Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed.  All are welcome.  No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.

Writing and Rhetoric Courses

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

001 - Writing about Identities - Collaborative Inquiry into Race & Identity
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Kostelnik

002 - Writing about Identities
TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Claire Chantell

003 - Writing about Identities
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Claire Chantell

004 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing & Digital Technologies 
MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
Patricia Sullivan

006 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing & Digital Technologies 
MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Patricia Sullivan

007 - Writing about Identities - Sports & Society
TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Marcus Meade

008 - Writing about Identities - Collaborative Inquiry into Race & Identity
TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Kostelnik

ENWR 1508 - Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch Sequence for Multilingual Writers

Offers instruction in academic writing, critical inquiry, and the conventions of American English for non-native speakers of English. Space is limited, and priority is given to students who are required to take the sequence by recommendation of the admissions office, the transition program, or the writing program.

001
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry (70 sections)

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

Spring 2021 Sections:

001 - Writing about the Arts - 
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Mary Clare Agnew

002 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Anna Martin-Beecher

003 - Writing about the Arts - Aliens, Diversity and Identity
TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous) 
Charity Fowler

004 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MWF 1200-1250 (In Person) New Cabell 309
Ankita Chakrabarti

005 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 330-445 (Hybrid with Remote Option)
Anna Martin-Beecher

006 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Food
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Keith Driver

007 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MWF 1100-1150 (Hybrid) Monroe 116
Ankita Chakrabarti

008 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing About Feminism, Diversity, and Community Engagement
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Indu Ohri

In a world of social distancing, flattening curves, and racial protests, do you wish that you could reach out and help others within the safety of your own home? How would you even know where to begin? During these uncertain times, many people have chosen to perform service work with the vulnerable and to write about social justice for women, minorities, and others. You will explore the answers to these questions in a profound and surprisingly local way by reading and writing about British and American women authors and sharing your knowledge with the Charlottesville community. These feminist works are the perfect place to search for answers because women writers have experienced injustice, oppression, and bigotry over the past three centuries. You will write about, reflect on, and perform community engagement through a feminist lens, especially since both movements serve historically disadvantaged populations. 

As you read these women authors’ works, you will discover powerful compositional moves and feminist rhetorical strategies that you can use to inspire others to take action and improve our world. You will further consider how their written reflections can foster values such as love, understanding, and compassion and cultivate your deeper self-awareness through contemplative writing. Together, we will use feminist rhetoric, reflective writing, and service work to engage in praxis, or the application of feminist theory to reality. As a class, we will work on our collective project with UVA’s volunteer center, Madison House, to plan out creative arts boxes for students in Charlottesville schools. Our Praxis Project will support their learning about BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) women, feminist activism, and women’s literature and inspire students to empower themselves through writing. 

009 - Writing about the Arts - Place and Class in Horror Fiction
MWF 1200-1250 (Hybrid) Chemistry Building 206
Grant King

What is horror as a genre? What conventions does it use? How does horror use place and class to tell its stories? Horror is an important part of our society’s culture that lets us explore our fears and our anxieties--it tells us who or what we are supposed to view as other, monstrous, terrifying. Through analyzing horror, we can understand our society’s biases towards normativity, and can perhaps even work to undercut them.

This course explores horror through the lens of place and class, with intertwining interests in race, gender, queerness, and the national traumas of the United States. We’ll read texts by a range of authors, and engage with a few films and TV series, to understand what horror tells us about our societal biases and to enrich our skills as writers.

010 - Writing about Culture/Society - Talk of the Town
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Tom Berenato

011 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MWF 1100-1150 (In Person) Clark G004
Amber McBride

012 - Writing about Culture/Society - Ideas of Home
MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
John Casteen IV

“Ideas of Home” invites students to explore the sense of identity and belonging in response to a series of writings on those concepts, broadly interpreted.  Home may be the place of one’s birth, of one’s current residence, or of one’s family’s ancestral places.  It may also be a metaphorical place, a way of being, a constellation of relationships to others in a community, or a set of habits of mind.  If writing well means thinking on the page, this course offers students the opportunity to write and think their way into the homes they come from, the homes they presently occupy, and the public and private homes they hope eventually to build for themselves and others.

013 - Writing about Culture/Society - Contagion
MWF 1100-1150 (In Person with Remote Option) Monroe 124
Kaylee Lamb

014 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing About Feminism, Diversity, and Community Engagement
MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Indu Ohri

In a world of social distancing, flattening curves, and racial protests, do you wish that you could reach out and help others within the safety of your own home? How would you even know where to begin? During these uncertain times, many people have chosen to perform service work with the vulnerable and to write about social justice for women, minorities, and others. You will explore the answers to these questions in a profound and surprisingly local way by reading and writing about British and American women authors and sharing your knowledge with the Charlottesville community. These feminist works are the perfect place to search for answers because women writers have experienced injustice, oppression, and bigotry over the past three centuries. You will write about, reflect on, and perform community engagement through a feminist lens, especially since both movements serve historically disadvantaged populations. 

As you read these women authors’ works, you will discover powerful compositional moves and feminist rhetorical strategies that you can use to inspire others to take action and improve our world. You will further consider how their written reflections can foster values such as love, understanding, and compassion and cultivate your deeper self-awareness through contemplative writing. Together, we will use feminist rhetoric, reflective writing, and service work to engage in praxis, or the application of feminist theory to reality. As a class, we will work on our collective project with UVA’s volunteer center, Madison House, to plan out creative arts boxes for students in Charlottesville schools. Our Praxis Project will support their learning about BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) women, feminist activism, and women’s literature and inspire students to empower themselves through writing. 

015 - Writing about Culture/Society - Race, Religion, and Democracy
TR 330-445 (In Person with Remote Option) Dell 2 100
DeVan Ard

016 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MWF 100-150 (In Person) New Cabell 323
Amber McBride

017 - Writing & Community Engagement - D.I.Y. (Do It Yourself)
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Michelle Gottschlich

D.I.Y., as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, D.I.Y. making has shifted dramatically through time—birthing the iconoclastic punk era, pinterest, GoFundMe healthcare, Tik Tok videos, soundcloud rap, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how ideas are crafted and cooked into the language of things. Through writing, reading, and discussion, we will carefully tease these ideas out to see what we really make of them. We’ll practice what we study as artists and writers, and we'll also chat with visiting D.I.Y. artists, musicians, and writers. Perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can collaborate and share our work with one another.

018 - Writing about Science & Tech - Observation & Evidence
MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Kenny Fountain

019 - Writing about Culture/Society - Solving Local Problems
MWF 1000-1050 (Online Synchronous) 
Jon D'Errico

020 - Writing about Culture/Society - Growing Up in the Digital Age
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Suzie Eckl

021 - Writing about Identities - Women, Romance, and Writing
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Samantha Wallace

022 - Writing & Community Engagement - Social Justice, Critical Race Theory & Argumentation
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Eyal Handelsman Katz

Imagine this: it’s Thanksgiving (or Hanukkah, or any social gathering with people who might not share your ideas). It’s perfectly pleasant (or not) and then – GASP! – someone brings up that topic. The one that always leads to an argument. And it does, and you argue but, afterwards, you are disappointed with how it turned out; perhaps you forgot to say something (or said too much). In this class we will endeavor to not be disappointed. To do so we will learn how to argue but, more importantly, how to think. Our writing will be a vehicle to our thinking. But how does writing relate to social justice? How can we use our writing to enact or advocate for social justice in our community? Since social justice is such a broad concept, in this course we will learn about it through the frame of critical race theory (CRT) and discover how activists, scholars, artists and more engage with racial justice, exploring issues like systemic racism, privilege, and intersectionality. This course will give you opportunities to think and write about the social justice issues you care about so that, when it ends, you are empowered to fight for the causes you believe in and never feel unprepared to discuss the topics that matter to you.

023 - Writing about Culture/Society - Music, Writing, Identity
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Steph Ceraso

024 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MWF 900-950 (In Person) New Cabell 309
Richard Milby

025 - Writing about Identities - Writing about the Body and Illness
TR 1230-145 (In Person) Dell 2 100
Miriam Grossman

026 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Utopia
TR 1230-145 (Hybrid with Remote Option) Dell 2 103
Emelye Keyser

027 - Writing about the Arts - Defining and Defending Your Taste
TR 930-1045 (Hybrid with Remote Option)
Jessica Walker

In this section of ENWR-1510, your personal taste serves as the point of departure. We will begin with your gut reaction to a piece of art or culture. Then we will use that reaction to build an essay. How do you make your ideas and opinions matter? How do you argue your taste is superior? How do you make sense of your aesthetics in the greater context of culture? How do you transform your reactions to Mozart, Megan Thee Stallion, a TikTok trend, Salvador Dali or your grandmother’s cooking into an essay that reaches beyond your initial response? In this class any piece of art or culture is valid material. High class, low class, no class, it’s all fair game. All I care about is that you care about your topic, whether you are writing from a place of adoration or revulsion.

028 - Writing about Digital Media - Writing about Interactive Media
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Sean Marcolini

029 - Writing about the Arts - Writing about Shadows
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Zoe Kempf-Harris

"Shadows are and aren’t—shapes without substance. Shadows come and go, and they are subject to time and place, to conditions of light and dark, and to the objects that give them form. In the course of this seminar, we will not only explore shadows as they appear in literature and art, but we will also explore the context for these shadows. What causes a shadow to fall within a passage—and why is it important that the shadow falls there specifically? Writing is born of intention, and literary shadows are intentional too.

Writing is how we use language to investigate that which presents itself obscurely— to make inquiries into and arguments about things that are uncertain. Working across the textual, the visual, and even the cinematic, we will examine how shadows function representationally and changeably. We will look to authors and artists to uncover how these shadows can be manipulated to serve the purpose of the text, as well as how these shadows color our understanding of the passages in which they appear. Undertaking a study of shadows will allow us to grapple with the duality that allows them to both obscure and represent the realities presented to us."

030 - Writing about Digital Media - "Algorithms and Advertising - Digital Influences"
MWF 1100-1150 (In Person) New Cabell 323
Sebastian Corrales

031 - Writing about Digital Media - Investigating Multiple Literacies in the Digital Age
MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
Katie Campbell

What does it mean to be literate? Digitally literate? Social media literate? News literate? In this class, we will explore these questions and more as we define and redefine literacy. We will also be thinking about and developing our own multiple literacies. We will specifically be focusing on literacy in relation to digital media, which has become increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic and in the world of social distancing. We will start our class by reading literacy narratives. You will then write your own literacy narrative, which will help you to think about your own relationship with multiple literacies. Then, we will read and write about digital news and online commencement speeches to understand what it means to be literate in these areas. Finally, at the end of our course, we will work with and critically think about literacy in relation to social media, specifically Instagram and Twitter. No prior experience with these social media platforms – or anything else we will cover in this course – is needed.

032 - Writing about Culture/Society - Documentary Nonfiction
MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Cassie Davies

This course will introduce students to the challenges and pleasures of essay-writing. The essay is a form that comes in many shapes and sizes, giving writers the space to examine meaningful subjects. The best way to learn about the different ways to write an essay is to study other writers, reading widely and with particular attention to the choices these writers make, so that students can borrow their tools in order to tell stories of their own. Students will read a variety of creative and critical essays that engage with different topics, from race and social inequality, to solar eclipses and surfing. Over the course of the semester, students will write two or three essays (to be determined) on topics of their choice, conducing independent research and interviews. Students will also choose and present on a documentary film. 

033 - Writing about Science & Tech - Citizen Science
TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Cory Shaman

034 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 1100-1215 (Online Synchronous)
Lindgren Johnson

035 - Writing about Culture/Society - The Art of Learning
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous) 
Lisa Aguirre

036 - Writing about the Arts - Defining and Defending Your Taste
TR 330-445 (Hybrid with Remote Option)
Jessica Walker

In this section of ENWR-1510, your personal taste serves as the point of departure. We will begin with your gut reaction to a piece of art or culture. Then we will use that reaction to build an essay. How do you make your ideas and opinions matter? How do you argue your taste is superior? How do you make sense of your aesthetics in the greater context of culture? How do you transform your reactions to Mozart, Megan Thee Stallion, a TikTok trend, Salvador Dali or your grandmother’s cooking into an essay that reaches beyond your initial response? In this class any piece of art or culture is valid material. High class, low class, no class, it’s all fair game. All I care about is that you care about your topic, whether you are writing from a place of adoration or revulsion.

037 - Writing about Science & Tech - Citizen Science
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous) 
Cory Shaman

038 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Towards Climate Action
MWF 900-950 (Hybrid with Remote Option) Maury 104
Hannah Loeb

This course is aimed at developing your ability to engage in written and spoken discourse both in academic contexts and in the broader, civic and social contexts of a university community, local communities, nation(s), and even global communities. It will ask you to use writing to discover how insight, precision, and nuance function across rhetorical contexts. It will incite occasions of writing and speaking as opportunities to initiate and sustain critical inquiry -- in other words, as loci for exploration of uncertainties as opposed to sites of static performance of the already-known. Above all, this course will place your writing at its center, giving you the chance to focus on when, why, and how you already are a consequential writer surrounded by other consequential writers, profoundly embedded in language and therefore flush with opportunities for expression and inquiry. This semester, our inquiry will focus on action we can and must take to mitigate the suffering that will accompany imminent climate disaster. We will begin by studying the discourses of disbelief, skepticism, misinformation, and inaction promulgated by those with vested interests in maintaining fossil fuel economies in America and around the world. We will complement that study with an exploration of forms and genres of witness, testimony, and appeal. Finally, we will take action through informed dialogue and outreach, including phone and text banking, as well as more systematically-oriented action like protest and appeals to those in power for specific, institutional changes. Course texts will include Losing Earth: A Recent History by Nathaniel Rich (2019) and The Story of More by Hope Jahren (2020), as well as the podcasts Mothers of Invention and Drilled

039 - Writing about Identities -
TR 500-615 (Online Asynchronous)
Elisabeth Blair

040 - Writing about Culture/Society - Is Chivalry Dead: From Knights to Incels and Reality TV
TR 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Katherine Churchill

Is chivalry dead? If so, who killed it? 

Context for our murder mystery: chivalry has shaped how we think about courtesy, gender, race, and power dynamics since the Middle Ages. But our understanding of it—and how we situate it in the present and the past—has changed drastically over time. Tracing a path from questing knights in shining armor to radicalized internet trolls and questions about giving up subway seats, we will investigate how fantasies of the past become rhetorical tools of the present. What is chivalry, anyway: humanizing kindness? An oppressive power dynamic? Is it truly old-fashioned? Or adaptable for a modern world? 

By observing how chivalry operates in texts from the 14th century to contemporary reality TV shows, we will learn to identify ideologies operating in art, science, and society and trace them across time periods. We will develop arguments about the relationships between social and political systems. In doing so, we will start to move comfortably between diverse genres and textssynthesize complex ideas, and imagine new ways of seeing the world. Together, we’ll attempt to respond to questions like these: How do we maintain a healthy relationship to the past? What assumptions and histories are built into our understanding of “good behavior”? What do we owe one another, anyway?

041 - Writing about Identities - Cosmopolitanism, Culture and Appropriation
TR 800-915 (Online Synchronous) 
Fina Mbabazi

042 - Writing about Culture/Society - Talk of the Town
TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Tom Berenato

043 - Writing about Identities -
TR 800-915 (Online Asynchronous)
Elisabeth Blair

044 - Writing about Culture/Society - Strategic Rhetoric and Persuasive Effect
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Robert Zenz

This class will introduce you to the concept of strategic rhetoric. Throughout the semester, we will analyze the relationship between language and thought in order to illustrate the  power of well-chosen words to influence ideas and behaviors. We will demystify the often nebulous concept of rhetoric by breaking down the mechanics of persuasion as it’s found across  multiple genres of literature, as well as in culture at large. Because our medium is the page, we  will write to explore deeply and thoughtfully questions such as: What does persuasion look like  to me? Why might it look different to someone else? How does language relate to power and/or the lack thereof? etc. Because power dynamics are inextricably entangled with questions of  influence, our class will simultaneously function as an exploration of the boundary line that  separates persuasion from its more sinister cousins: manipulation and coercion. Most importantly, we will write to analyze the effects of strategic rhetoric and to implement the various techniques we learn in ways that supercharge our own persuasive endeavors.  

045 - Writing about Culture/Society - Documentary Nonfiction
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Cassie Davies

This course will introduce students to the challenges and pleasures of essay-writing. The essay is a form that comes in many shapes and sizes, giving writers the space to examine meaningful subjects. The best way to learn about the different ways to write an essay is to study other writers, reading widely and with particular attention to the choices these writers make, so that students can borrow their tools in order to tell stories of their own. Students will read a variety of creative and critical essays that engage with different topics, from race and social inequality, to solar eclipses and surfing. Over the course of the semester, students will write two or three essays (to be determined) on topics of their choice, conducing independent research and interviews. Students will also choose and present on a documentary film. 

046 - Writing about Culture/Society - Place & the American Citizen
TR 330-445 (In Person) New Cabell 323
Andrew Eaton

047 - Writing about the Arts - Imitation and the Apprenticeship of Writing
MWF 1100-1150 (In Person) Clark 102
Catherine Blume

In this course, we will explore writing as an apprenticeship. Imagine that you are a young painter living in 15th century Florence. Your parents have apprenticed you to one of the most well-known painters of the day and since a young age, you have been working your way up in the workshop. First, you were just sweeping floors and cleaning up dyes and tints; then, you began mixing paints; eventually, you were allowed to assist your master in compositions until finally, you have completed a Master Piece all on your own, proving that you have both mastered the style and technique taught to you by your master as well as experimented with your own style and techniques. In this example, you have mastered your craft first through imitation and then through exploration and experimentation. We will apply the same approach to writing in this course and choose for our masters some of the most well-known writers and rhetoricians of the Western Tradition—from Cicero to Hemingway—to guide us in our Writer’s Workshop.

048 - Writing about the Arts - Reimagining Shakespeare’s The Tempest
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Mary Ruth Robinson

049 - Writing about Culture/Society - Letters
MW 500-615 (Online Synchronous)
Annie Persons

050 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing Power: Language Politics in Communities and Controversies
TR 800-915 (Online Synchronous)
Tarushi Sonthalia

Our current president deliberately changing Coronavirus to Chinese Virus in his speech. Felicia Sonmez, a reporter at The Washington Post, being suspended for tweeting about the sexual assault allegations against Kobe Bryant after his death. Choosing a preferred pronoun of address: he/she/them. Choosing to identify (or not) as straight, gay, lesbian, queer, pansexual, asexual, transsexual, bisexual, or intersexual. Hundreds and thousands of people getting married everyday by simply saying “I do.” Some people being branded as terrorists and others being branded as unstable for similar acts of violence. And, finally, getting back to the person we started with: Remember covfefe, anyone?

Whether you’re familiar with these examples, whether you remember the covfefe debacle does not matter. What matters is that you are an individual who communicates with others, you are an individual who uses words. And, because words carry power and power operates through words, you are an individual who wields a whole lot of power. At the same time, power is wielded around you and against you as well.

In this course, we will wrestle with power using words—by reading words written by others and by writing words of our own. This wrestling will depend on a nuanced, intelligent, and sensitive engagement with power’s many markers—race, gender, sexuality, class, and caste, to name a few. We will work with a wide range of texts in journeying through linguistic power—theoretical texts, novels, short stories, poetry, and the dizzying world of digital media. Most importantly, this engagement with a diverse range of texts will serve as an aid for you to produce texts of your own and become aware of yourselves as active interlocutors in the various networks of power—it will allow you to see that power is written and writing is power.

051 - Writing about Culture/Society - Documentary Nonfiction
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Piers Gelly

052 - Writing about Culture/Society - Race, Religion, and Democracy
TR 930-1045 (In Person with Remote Option) Maury 209
DeVan Ard

053 - Writing about the Arts - Points of View
TR 800-915 (Online Synchronous)
Matt Davis

This course is intended to help you develop writing skills that will help you succeed while you are at UVA and also after you graduate. The theme for this section will be "points of view" in fiction. We will read and write about short stories, with a special focus on different ways of narrating a story. The fiction readings will be taken from a classic but rather unusual anthology, Points of View, in which the stories are classified according to the mode of narration used in the story. One section of the anthology contains "interior monologues," in which we seem to be inside the main character's head, hearing his or her thoughts in live time; another section contains "dramatic monologues,"in which we seem to overhear the narrator speaking aloud to another character; a third, letters written by the characters; a fourth, diary entries; and so on. We will look at eleven modes of narration and study two examples of most modes, reading about twenty stories in all.

You will complete six substantial written assignments -- three narratives and three argumentative essays. For the narratives, you will be asked to use one of the modes of narration we have studied to tell a story. The narratives should be appx. 3-6 pages in length. (Longer is not necessarily better.) Each narrative will be written once, without opportunity for revision. For the argumentative essays, you will be asked to write an essay with a thesis and supporting textual evidence. Each essay should be appx. 4-7 pages long, but quality of writing, thinking, and argumentation are more important than length. The argumentative essays will be drafted, workshopped, and revised. In addition, you will learn some principles of composition, complete some exercises related to writing, and complete a library assignment.

054 - Writing about the Arts - Writing About Contemporary Poetry
TR 800-915 (Online Synchronous)
Annyston Pennington

055 - Writing about the Arts -
MWF 900-950 (Online Synchronous)
Zheng-Liann Schuster

056 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Home
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah O'Brien

057 - Writing about the Arts - Academic Writing & Modernist Thinking
MWF 1100-1150 (In Person) Maury 209
Andrew Chen

058 - Writing about Identities -Writing with Resilience
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Devin Donovan

059 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Home
MWF 1000-1050 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah O'Brien

060 - Writing about Culture/Society - Letters
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah Storti

061 - Writing & Community Engagement - Rhetoric, Space & Community
TR 930-1045 (Hybrid) New Cabell 323
Eva Latterner

062 - Writing about Culture/Society -
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Lindgren Johnson

063 - Writing about Culture/Society -
MW 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Anastatia Curley

064 - Writing about Culture/Society - Documentary Nonfiction
MW 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Piers Gelly

066 - Writing about the Arts - 
MW 630-745 (Online Synchronous)
Mary Clare Agnew

067 - Writing about Culture/Society - Writing about Food
TR 630-745 (Online Synchronous)
Keith Driver

068 - Writing about Culture/Society - Talk of the Town
TR 630-745 (Online Synchronous) 
Tom Berenato

069 - Writing about Identities - Writing about the Body and Illness
TR 1100-1215 (In Person) New Cabell 323
Miriam Grossman

070 - Multilingual Writers
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

071 - Multilingual Writers
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous) 
Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

ENWR 1520 - Writing and Community Engagement (2 sections)

001 - Writing about Housing Equity
TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Stephenson

Why do we live where we do? How does housing impact our access to education, food, medical care, and other resources? What can the local built environment tell us about access to housing? Why are some people homeless? What is affordable housing and why is there so little of it? By partnering with The Haven and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like homelessness, affordable housing, privilege, food insecurity, the eviction crisis, systems of power, and community engagement.  We will also work with The Haven Writer's Circle to produce an online zine at the end of the semester.

002 - Writing about Food Equity
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Stephenson

Why do we eat what we eat? Do poor people eat more fast food than wealthy people? Why do men like to eat steak more than women? Why are Cheetos cheaper than cherries? Do you have to be skinny to be hungry? By partnering with a local community garden and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like hunger stereotypes, privilege, food insecurity, food production, and community engagement.  

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar (5 sections)

001 - Writing about the Arts - Fandom Ethnography
TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous) 
Charity Fowler

002 - Writing about the Arts - Writing for Life
MW 200-315 (Hybrid) New Cabell 309
Jim Seitz

003 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Charlottesville
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Kevin Smith

What does it mean to “write” a place? to write Charlottesville? How is Charlottesville written? There are many ways a place is comes to have meaning: through history, cartography, journalism, ad campaigns, and city ordinances. There are also less institutionally-sanctioned ways that a place is written: through activism, public art, graffiti, oral histories, and conversations. This class will focus on this interrelation between writing and place. We will explore questions like: Who gets to write Charlottesville? How does a place come to have meaning and what is the role of writing in that process? What role do you play in writing/shaping Charlottesville?

004 - Writing & Community Engagement - Writing Charlottesville
TR 1230-145 (Online Synchronous)
Kevin Smith

What does it mean to “write” a place? to write Charlottesville? How is Charlottesville written? There are many ways a place is comes to have meaning: through history, cartography, journalism, ad campaigns, and city ordinances. There are also less institutionally-sanctioned ways that a place is written: through activism, public art, graffiti, oral histories, and conversations. This class will focus on this interrelation between writing and place. We will explore questions like: Who gets to write Charlottesville? How does a place come to have meaning and what is the role of writing in that process? What role do you play in writing/shaping Charlottesville?

005 - Writing & Community Engagement
M 600-830 (Online Synchronous)
Stephen Parks

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing (5 sections)

001 - Digital Public Writing
TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Kevin Smith

This course examines what it means to write to a public in the digital age and how our rhetorical and compositional practices have changed in response to networked technology. Students will produce and analyze digital compositions meant to circulate beyond the walls of the classroom, for public audiences, and will develop rhetorical frameworks to address a wide range of future writing situations.

007 - Home Movies
MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Sarah O'Brien

Of the many changes wrought by the pandemic, perhaps none will prove as enduring as the upending of our sense of being “at home.” We will explore the shifting dimensions of domestic space in the time of COVID-19 and the preceding century by watching and writing about different kinds of “home movies”: amateur movies that document family life, fiction films that envision home in striking ways, and reality television and documentary film. By working with a community partner on a collective filmmaking and/or screening project, we will also expand our understanding of home to encompass not just the four-walled container of the nuclear family but also more diffuse physical and/or virtual communities.

009 - Science & Medical Communications (This section is reserved for Echols scholars)
MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous)
Kiera Allison

010 - Rewriting Yourself: Literacy & the Brain - (This section is reserved for Echols scholars)
MWF 1200-1250 (Online Synchronous)
Heidi Nobles

What do we know and what are we still learning about writing and the human brain? Literacy has dramatically reshaped the human brain over millennia. Yet as literacy itself evolves, we still lack satisfactory data on how writing (and its counterpart, reading) affects our neurology and cognition--and therefore, how literacy affects who we are as humans. In this reading- and writing-intensive course, we will read a range of work on literacy and cognition, including technical and popular treatments of issues such as reading and neural development, brain function during writing tasks, brain activity connected to other creative tasks, and more. We’ll read work from creativity experts, neurologists and cognitive scientists, psychologists, mental health practitioners, computer scientists, and professional writers and editors, all in trying to understand the relationship between literacy and our minds. Reading assignments will include 1-4 extended “read-in” activities; writing assignments will include a combination of creative, reflective, and research-based projects. By the term’s end, you should have an enriched sense of yourself as a reader and writer, and how your literacy practices play into your larger identity.

Note: This class welcomes students with multiple interests and backgrounds for interdisciplinary discussions about how reading and writing affect us all. Students with prior experience in or specialized interest in the brain will be able to dive deeper; students who are more inclined toward the arts and humanities can also expect engaging readings and lively writing assignments.

011 - History and Culture of Writing at UVA
MWF 1100-1150 (Online Synchronous)
Heidi Nobles

The University of Virginia, founded in 1819, began with a rich history of writing and writers; that tradition continues today. But with so many different writing activities taking place across Grounds and across time, we may not fully appreciate what all this culture means.

In this course, you will both research and contribute to the culture of writing at UVA. You’ll have a chance to read the (mostly unpublished) writing of past students and faculty, to see where we’ve come from.

You’ll investigate current writing activities across Grounds, helping put together a puzzle that reveals what and how we’re writing today. And finally, you’ll create your own original writing to add to our university archives, making your mark for future generations to read. Through this hands-on literary adventure, you will gain a holistic sense of UVA's rich writing culture and your place, as well.

ENWR 2610 - Writing with Style

001
TR 200-315 (Online Synchronous)
Keith Driver

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

No fake news here, but rather progressive exercises in developing the news-writing style of writing from straight hard news to "soft" features. Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

001
TR 800-915 (In Person) Dell 2 101
C. Brian Kelly

002
TR 930-1045 (In Person) Dell 2 101
C. Brian Kelly

ENWR 2800 - Public Speaking

001
MWF 900-950 (Online Synchronous) (This section is reserved for Echols scholars)
Kiera Allison

002
MWF 1000-1050 (Online Synchronous)
Kiera Allison

003- Section 003 will be paired with a 1-credit Contemplative Lab (RELG 1559)
TR 200-315 (Hybrid) Bryan 235
Devin Donovan

ENWR 3500 - Topics in Advanced Writing: Writing the Anthropocene

TR 930-1045 (Online Synchronous)
Cory Shaman

ENWR 3620 - Tutoring Across Cultures

TR 330-445 (Online Synchronous)
Kate Kostelnik

In this course, we’ll look at a variety of texts from academic arguments, narratives, and pedagogies, to consider what it means to write, communicate, and learn across cultures. Topics will include contrastive rhetorics, world Englishes, rhetorical listening, and tutoring multilingual writers. A service-learning component will require students to virtually tutor students in sections of ENWR1506, my first-year writing courses. We will discuss pedagogies and practical, strengths-based strategies in working with multi-lingual learners on their writing; tutor first-years; and create writing projects that convey learning from these experiences. While the course will specifically prepare students to tutor multilingual writers, these skills are adaptable and applicable across disciplines and discourses. Our techniques and pedagogies will also be applicable to native-speakers. Basically, students will learn how to use dialogic engagement to support collaboration and conversation across cultures. Self-designed final writing projects will give students from various majors—education, public policy, commerce, social sciences, and STEM—the opportunity to combine their specific discourse knowledge with our course content. Additionally, students who successfully complete the course are invited to apply to work on the UVa writing center.  

ENWR 3900 - Career-Based Writing and Rhetoric

MWF 100-150 (Online Synchronous) 
Jon D'Errico

Undergraduate Courses